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11,398 people died in road accidents due to potholes, speed breakers, humps in 2014

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By NewsGram Staff-Writer

New Delhi: The government has recorded that more than 11,000 people have died last year in road accidents due to potholes, humps, and speed-breakers.

Photo Credit: www.dnaindia.com
Photo Credit: www.dnaindia.com

According to the Road Accident Report (2014) published by the road transport and highways ministry, 11,398 people have died in 2014 due to humps, badly designed speed-breakers, and potholes. Uttar Pradesh topped the list with 4,455 deaths in such accidents.

The potholes had caused a total of 11,106 crashes that resulted in the deaths of 3,039 people. Similarly, the crashes due to speed-breakers and humps were 11,008 and 13,449, respectively. The deaths in those crashes were 3,633 and 4,726, respectively.

Another 4,100 people died in crashes that happened on roads under repair or roads under construction.

Madhya Pradesh registered 915 deaths due to bad road conditions, whereas Karnataka and Bihar registered 970 and 867 fatalities, respectively. Odisha, Jharkhand, West Bengal, and Tamil Nadu registered 569, 478, 375, and 636 deaths, respectively.

Maharashtra registered 592 deaths, out of which 224 died due to crashes on roads under repair or under construction and the rest due to potholes, speed-breakers, and humps.

Poor maintenance that results in potholes, lack of uniformity, and improperly designed speed breakers are among the major reasons.

(With inputs from Times of India)

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550 mn Indians live with uncorrected refractive errors, leading to rampant road accidents

Poor vision plays a critical role in safe driving

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Road accidents in India
Road accidents in India. Pixabay

New Delhi, Sep 11, 2017: With a staggering 550 million Indians — close to half the population — living with uncorrected refractive errors, the major cause of road accidents, and 63 percent of the world’s population in need of vision correction, two major stakeholders have come together to address the issue in this country and globally.

“Poor vision plays a critical role in safe driving, but we know that much of that could be avoided. According to an analysis by Boston Consulting Group, 23 per cent of drivers have uncorrected vision, but in India that number is 46 per cent — the highest of any country in the world,” Jayanth Bhuvaraghan, Chief Mission Officer of French lensmaker Essilor International, told IANS during a visit here of the three-year partnership with the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA).

The “Action for Road Safety” partnership aims to create awareness on this global health issue and highlight the importance of regular eye checks for safe driving. The call to “Check Your Vision” will be commonly promoted towards local authorities, institutions, NGOs, eye care & medical professionals, driving schools and road users, among others, he added.

The figures for India are horrifying with some 138,000 people being killed in road accidents each year. Last week, Minister for Road Transport & Highways Nitin Gadkari released the annual publication, ‘Road Accidents in India – 2016’, which revealed that fatalities resulting from these accidents have risen by about 3.2 per cent.

According to the Home Ministry, there was a 17.6 per cent increase in road accident deaths from 2008 to 2012, and 50 per cent of those who died were aged between 15 and 34.

“Something must be changed,” exclaimed Kristan Gross, Global Executive Director of the Vision Impact Institute, which is funded by the Essilor Social Impact Fund.

Speaking about the initiative in India, Bhuvaraghan noted that access to optometric eye care is limited, as there are approximately seven doctors of optometry per 1 million people across India, well below the world average of 25/1M.

Also Read: Unnatural deaths mostly due to road accidents in India: Report 

“But there is one other key barrier to corrected vision that we must still address: Acceptance. In India, stigmas exist around spectacle wear for all ages, but it is a tremendous issue for those in the professional driving industry.

“We have heard from many in this industry that wearing spectacles can be seen as a weakness or a visible defect. Therefore, many drivers are not wearing the correction they need, even when it is prescribed. Drivers were fearful of not being hired if they are thought to be defective,” he added.

To this end, The Vision Impact Institute is working to break down these stigmas through education, utilising the personal testimonies of other drivers for which vision correction and eye protection have been a benefit rather than a drawback, Gross explained.

A Central Road Research Institute (CRRI) interim report on ‘Assessment of Visual Limitations of Commercial Drivers in Metropolitan Cities in India’ focusses on commercial drivers in Delhi. The study was in association with the Vision Impact Institute. The sample size of the survey was 627 drivers and the study was conducted during August 8-14, 2017. Seventy per cent of those surveyed were light motor vehicle drivers, 24 per cent were heavy motor vehicle drivers, four per cent were private bus drivers while one per cent were government bus drivers.

According to the preliminary findings:

* One in every three drivers had either marginal or poor Far Visual Acuity (distance vision)

* Half the drivers surveyed had either marginal or poor Near Visual Acuity (near vision)

* Overall 29 per cent drivers, mostly among the older age group, with marginal and unacceptable stereopsis (depth perception) problems were more likely to be involved in accidents

* Overall 34 per cent drivers were found glare blind (56-60 per cent of the younger group of drivers had glare-related problems, 29-44 per cent of the older group of drivers had glare-related problems)

As for FIA, with its 245 member-clubs, representing over 80 million road users in 144 countries worldwide and its strong showcase in motor sport (F1, WEC, WTCC, WRC, World RX, ERC, Formula E et al), it “is a major global voice in the automotive world and is strongly committed to raising awareness and taking action on this global issue”, Bhuvaraghan concluded. (IANS)

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Drunk Russian diplomat hits biker, punches police

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New Delhi: In a case of drunken driving and road rage, a severely intoxicated diplomat of the Russian embassy hit a motorbike and then rammed his vehicle into a police barricade in Moti Bagh at 1:30 am Wednesday. Two persons were critically injured in the accident.

Instead of stopping his vehicle after colliding with the bike, he tried to flee and in the process barged into the police barricade.

He allegedly roughed up the on-duty police constable and punched him.

A friend of the diplomat had to intervene to stop the scuffle. The friend had a long conversation with the police before taking the Russian diplomat away.

“He was so intoxicated that he could not control the car and he was practically unconscious. He was driving really fast and was unable to stop. His car is so badly damaged and this is proof of how hard he rammed into the police barricade. When the police tried to get him out of the car, he refused to do so,” one of the bikers said.

The biker was admitted in AIIMS. The Russian diplomat also suffered injuries on his face.

The police have contacted Russian embassy and asked them to take a legal action against the Russian diplomat.

(With inputs from agencies)

(Picture Courtesy:www.media.newindianexpress.com)

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22 injured in Himachal accident

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Shimla : At least 22 people were injured when a Haryana Roadways bus rolled down a hill near Solan town in Himachal Pradesh on Sunday, police said.

The bus was on its way from Shimla to Delhi when it met with the accident, police said.
The victims were admitted to a hospital in Solan, some 45 km from Himachal Pradesh.

(IANS)
(Photo Credit : youtube.com)