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Three men held for ‘Crucifixion’ styled attack in Limerick, Ireland

The three men who have connection this horror nail gun attack are aged 32, 33 and 52 respectively and have appeared in the court under Section Four of the Criminal Justice Act.

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Patrick Hayes, Ger Mackin and Mark Heffernan (From left to right) . Image source: irishmirror.ie
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May 25,2016: Limerick, Ireland: The garda (police) have arrested 3 men in connection to the horror ‘crucifixion’ style attack in which a man had his feet nailed to floor. The trio appeared in the limerick district court today.

The victim was 53 year old man was reportedly lured to a house on the south side of Limerick on the 14 September last year. He was tied to a chair and beaten by the 3 men who were wearing white boiler suit.

Two of the men were being questioned at Roxboro Garda Station. Image source:RTE News
Two of the men were being questioned at Roxboro Garda Station. Image source:RTE News

It seems that during that after the beating a nail gun was used to nail both his feet to the kitchen floor. He managed even to escape after all three attackers left the home.

The three men who have connection this horror  nail gun attack are aged 32, 33 and 52 respectively and have appeared in the court under Section Four of the Criminal Justice Act.

All the 3 are charged with linked to the assault and false imprisonment of the man.

It appears that 30 Garda (policeman) were involved in the investigation of this case and three accused were being held at Roxboro and Mayorstone Garda Stations and are due to appear before Limerick District Court at 10.30am today

– By Bhaskar Raghavendran. Bhaskar is a graduate in Journalism and mass communication and a reporter at NewsGram. Twitter handle: bhaskar_ragha

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Good education can curb childhood abuse effects: Study

Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims

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Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
  • A good education may help reduce effects of childhood abuse
  • Abuse which children suffer in young age can make them criminals
  • Poor grades can shift students towards crime too

Good grades and proper schooling may help in protecting victims of childhood abuse from indulging in criminal behaviour in adulthood, a study says.

The emotional and sexual abuse that some kids endure during their childhood can lead them to commit crimes later in life. But when they achieve good grades in childhood and complete their academics, the likelihood of indulging in criminal behaviour declines significantly.

By funding K-12 Public Schools, Qatar Foundation is promoting Arabic in American schools. Pixabay.
Bad education can lead to children moving towards committing crimes. Pixabay.

“Child abuse is a risk factor for later antisocial behaviour,” said Todd Herrenkohl, Professor at the University of Michigan in the US.

“Education and academic achievement can lessen the risk of crime for all youth, including those who have been abused (encountered stress and adversity),” Herrenkohl added.

However, for some children who are weak in academic performance and get suspended in grades seven to nine, the offending habits and antisocial behaviour tends to stay with them even later in life, the researchers said.

Also Read: Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

The study, published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, noted that the primary prevention of child abuse is a critical first step to reduce antisocial behaviour at the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Researchers followed 356 people from childhood (ages 18 months to 6 years), school-age (8 years), adolescent (18 years) and adulthood (36 years).

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Child abuse can make children criminals. VOA

Parent-child interactions measured various types of abuse and neglect, and responses also factored educational experiences and criminal behaviour against others or property. Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims.

“Strategies focused on helping school professionals become aware of the impacts of child abuse and neglect are critical to building supportive environments that promote resilience and lessen the risk for antisocial behaviour,” Herrenkohl said. IANS