Tuesday October 17, 2017
Home Uncategorized RTI plea reje...

RTI plea rejected by Govt , protects RAW agents abroad

0
180
photo source: www.livelaw.in

COUNTERVIEW‎‎‎‎‎: New Delhi: Tuesday, March 29, 2016.
The Government of India has rejected a right to information (RTI) plea seeking information about “laws, rules and regulations” that explain the nature and the extent of legal protection provided to officers and employees of the Research and Analysis Wing (RAW), who are engaged in overseas intelligence operations.
In his RTI plea to the Cabinet secretariat in January 2016, senior Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (CHRI) activist Venkatesh Nayak had also sought information regarding “procedures, norms, instructions or guidelines” that contain details of the action that must be taken by the Government of India to defend the officers and employees of RAW engaged in overseas intelligence operations.
He had also sought information the action that the Government of India is obliged to take upon receipt of information about the death of any officer or employee of RAW who was engaged in overseas intelligence operations, due to any adverse action taken against him/her by any agency in a foreign country.
Nayak says, by refusing the information, the Government of India is stating that, while it wants citizens to work for them to gather and analyse intelligence for maintaining the external security of the country, they will not tell people what mechanisms exist for ensuring their safety and security.
The RTI plea acquires importance against the backdrop of a recent report of arrest of a person of Indian origin by Pakistan’s law enforcement agencies. While Pakistan summoned India’s envoy to that country and issued a demarche about the alleged “interference” by India in its internal affairs in Balochistan through R&AW, the official spokesperson for the Ministry of External Affairs vehemently denied it.
However, the Ministry confirmed the apprehended individual is a retired Indian Navy officer and has sought consular access to him.
Pointing out that “there is no information in the public domain about what must be done, if, heavens forbid, an Indian intelligence operative were to be murdered abroad”, Nayak believes, “This is a concern that is very much valid even though it must not be taken as a comment on the latest incident of the apprehension of an Indian national in Pakistan.”
Two weeks after the RTI plea was filed, Cabinet Secretariat rejected the RTI application stating that all the information sought pertained to the organization is “exempt” from the purview of the RTI Act under Section 24. “Interestingly, the CPIO does not even mention the name, R&AW in his reply. So high is the level of secrecy”, comments Nayak.
Saying that the reply “is in tune with past attempts which frustrate all efforts to secure basic transparency in the working of exempt organizations”, Nayak says, in 2014 the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) replied to an RTI plea that the actions of left wing militants in blowing up a CRPF convoy resulting in the deaths of CRPF personnel in Bihar and Chhattisgarh during election duty “did not amount to human rights violation of the deceased”.
“I hope the same attitude is not adopted by the intelligence agencies in relation to their operatives who are posted abroad”, Nayak says, adding, “The citizens of India have the right to know what measures the Government is required to undertake by law to ensure the safe return of its external intelligence operatives even though they may not have been involved in the latest case as clarified by the Government.”
“R&AW is also not transparent about the manner in which it deals with RTI applications year after year”, Nayak says, adding, “The Central Information Commission’s Annual Report for 2014-15 lists only one instance of rejection of an RTI application under Section 24 for the entire year.”
Noting that “it is highly unlikely that R&AW received only one RTI application during this period”, Nayak says, the Intelligence Bureau (IB) “received more than a thousand RTI applications in 2014-15. Of these 95.5% requests were rejected by invoking Section 24 of the RTI Act.” The IB is India’s premier internal intelligence agency.

 

credits : http://mahitiadhikar.blogspot.in/2016/03/govt-of-india-refuses-to-make-public.html?m=1

Next Story

Was Taj Mahal Once a Shiva Temple? The Debate over the Tomb Continues

According to some historians, Taj Mahal was incipiently a Shiva Temple offered to the Mughals as a form of the gift by a Rajput king

0
36
Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal. Wikimedia Commons

New Delhi, August 16, 2017: The famous monument from the Mughal era, Taj Mahal is once more in contention as the Central Information Commission (CIC) has requested the Central government to clear up unequivocally whether it is a tomb or a Shiva Temple. An RTI came to the CIC regarding the same, in response to which the quasi-constitutional body solicited answers from the culture minister.

But where did this question come from and what is the source?

According to some historians, Taj Mahal was incipiently a Shiva Temple offered to the Mughals as a form of the gift by a Rajput king. The hypothesis says that the temple was later formed into the monument that dwells graves of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan and his adored wife Mumtaz Mahal, mentioned IndiaNews.

Also Read: Firozabad Glass Industry is Declining: Is Taj Mahal to be Blamed? 

In 2015, a case was recorded in Agra by six lawyers, requesting that the tomb ought to be given over to Hindus for worship. The litigation solicited to forbid Islamic religious actions performed in the monument and remove the graves.

PN Oak, a revisionist historian also made the claim in his 1989  book “Taj Mahal” that the name Taj Mahal was procured from a Sanskrit word “Tejo Mahalay’ meaning a Shiva Temple.

The Cultural Minister Mahesh Sharma denied the claims in response to the question put forward to him that the Seventh wonder of the world was a Shiva Temple.


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 

Next Story

Nearly 35 percent paucity of teachers in 23 IITs: RTI

Gaud stated that currently, IITs stand at 1:16 student-teacher ratio while they are trying to attain 1:10 student teacher ratio

0
93
paucity of teachers
IIT Bombay, Wikimedia

Indore, February 15, 2017: “As against sanctioned strength of 7,744 teachers, 5,072 teachers are teaching 82,603 students in 23 IITs. This means 2,672 posts are lying vacant which is 35 per cent,” Neemuch-based activist Chandrashekhar Gaud told citing a reply from an official in Union HRD ministry. The break up was provided till 1st October, 2016

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

An RTI inquiry unveiled that around 35 percent of posts of teachers are remaining vacant in 23 IITs in the entire country.

Gaud stated that currently, IITs stand at 1:16 student-teacher ratio while they are trying to attain 1:10 student teacher ratio.

According to “Super 30” founder, Anand Kumar spoke, “the government opened new IITs in the last couple of years in a haste, but has failed to provide necessary infrastructure like laboratories etc. This is affecting the quality of these IITs, which in long term could affect the brand IIT at a global level.”

According to Gaud, the old IITs too are equally affected by the paucity of teachers.

“In old IITs, 30 per cent posts of teachers are lying vacant at IIT Bombay, Delhi (35%), Guwahati (27%), Kanpur (37%), Kharagpur (46%), Madras (28%), Roorkee (45%) and IIT BHU (47%),” he stated quoting from the HRD reply.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

Only 3935 teachers are working against 6250 posts that accounts 37 per cent lesser than sanctioned strength, in these eight IITs

The paucity of teachers in IIT Bhubaneshwar is 35%, IIT Gandhinagar (11%), IIT Hyderabad (16%), IIT Jodhpur (39%), IIT Patna (20%), IIT Raipur (24%), IIT Tirupati (39%), IIT Palakkad (28%) and IIT Dhanbad (36%).

 

-prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar of NewsGram. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

 

 

Next Story

Rs 6 Crore allocated for propagation of Right to Information (RTI) Act for the ongoing Fiscal

Up to November 26, the government has spent an amount of Rs 3.94 crore out of the total allocation for this fiscal

0
81
RTI, Source: rtionline.gov.in

New Delhi, Dec 1, 2016: The Lok Sabha was informed on Wednesday that a sum of Rs six crore has been allocated for the propagation of Right to Information (RTI) Act for the ongoing fiscal.

For 2016-17, the budget allocation is marginally high from the last fiscal’s Rs 5.27 crore but very low from Rs 21 crore earmarked for the year 2014-15, according to a written reply by the Minister of State for Personnel Jitendra Singh in the lower House, mentioned PTI.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Up to November 26, the government has spent an amount of Rs 3.94 crore out of the total allocation for this fiscal, it said.

The then UPA government brought the RTI Act that empowers the citizens to seek time-bound reply on governance-related information, failing to which actions are taken.

– prepared by NewsGram with PTI inputs