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714 Iraqis killed in October due to terrorism: UN

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United Nations: At least 714 Iraqis were killed and 1,269 others wounded in acts of terrorism, violence, and armed conflict in October, UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric told reporters here on Monday.

While addressing a daily news briefing here, Dujarric quoted Jan Kubis, the UN secretary-general’s special representative for Iraq, as saying that the figures illustrate the suffering of the people of Iraq from terrorism and conflict.

The latest casualty figures were contained in a report from the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq (UNAMI).

UNAMI said in a statement that 559 of those killed in October were civilians, including civilian police, while 155 were members of Iraqi security forces, the Iraqi Interior Ministry’s Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) forces and militias fighting alongside the Iraqi army.

The figures do not include casualties in Anbar province, which the UN mission says it could not obtain.

Iraq is currently witnessing a wave of violence. The overall security situation in the Middle East country has deteriorated since the Islamic State terrorist group, many of whose members are foreign militants, took control of parts of Iraq’s northern and western regions in June 2014.

The IS has been committing vicious crimes against all ethnic and religious communities in Iraq, including Shias, Sunnis, Kurds, Christians, and Yazadi Kurds.

(IANS)

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69,000 babies born on New Year’s day in India: Unicef

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69,000 babies born on New Year's day in India: Unicef
69,000 babies born on New Year's day in India: Unicef. wikimedia commons
United Nations, Jan 2, 2018: The United Nations Children’s Fund (Unicef) has estimated that nearly 386,000 babies were born on New Year’s Day, with India heading the list with 69,070.
More than 90 percent of the births took place in less developed regions, reports Xinhua news agency.
The Unicef reported that globally over half the births were estimated to have taken place in nine countries: India (69,070), China (44,760), Nigeria (20,210), Pakistan (14,910), Indonesia(13,370), the US (11,280), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (9,400), Ethiopia (9,020) and Bangladesh (8,370).
Among those children, some will unfortunately not make it past their first day.
In 2016, an estimated 2,600 children died within the first 24 hours every day of the year. Unicef said that for almost two million newborns, their first week was also their last.
In all, 2.6 million children died before the end of their first month. Among them, more than 80 percent died from preventable and treatable causes such as premature birth, complications during delivery and infections like sepsis and pneumonia.
Over the past two decades, the world has seen unprecedented progress in child survival, halving the number of children worldwide who die before their fifth birthday to 5.6 million in 2016.
But despite these advances, there has been slower progress for newborns. Babies dying in the first month account for 46 percent of all deaths among children under five.
Next month, Unicef will launch “Every Child Alive,” a global campaign to demand and deliver affordable, quality health care solutions for every mother and newborn.
These solutions include a steady supply of clean water and electricity at health facilities, presence of a skilled health attendant during birth, disinfecting the umbilical cord, breastfeeding within the first hour after birth and skin-to-skin contact between the mother and child. (IANS)

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