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‘Aadishilp’ important platform for tribal artisans: Oram

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New Delhi: Tribal Affairs Minister Jual Oram on Monday inaugurated the National Tribal Crafts Mela ‘Aadishilp’ here and said the event is an important platform for tribal artisans to showcase their talents.

“This kind of exhibition provides our tribal artisans an important platform to showcase their talents through their products to urban India,” said Oram while inaugurating the exhibition at Dilli Haat.

“The ministry of tribal affairs will provide more and more such platforms for tribal artisans so that they can sell their products directly to the consumer without middlemen,” he added.

Tribal Cooperative Marketing Development Federation of India Ltd (TRIFED) through its 44 sales counter all over the country is providing the much needed marketing system for tribal products, the minister said.

The exhibition will be open till November 11.

“Unique and exquisite tribal artefacts of over 90 tribal artisans from all over the country are participating in this exhibition. Hand crafted items, handloom products, dry flowers, cane and bamboo products, tribal jewellery, dhokra craft, tribal weaves, embroidery, tribal paintings and lot more is being exhibited at the venue,” said an official statement.

The statement further said: “Aadishilp provides them a platform for direct interface with art and craft lovers, share their talent with the urban elite and know the customers taste and preferences for adapting their product designs and creations accordingly.”

The main objective of organizing Aadishilp is to give tribal artisans an opportunity to showcase and sell their traditional art and craft works directly to the customers and get their feedback which would help them in having valuable design related and other inputs.

Aadishilp provides them a platform for direct interface with art and craft lovers, share their talent with the urban elite and know the customers taste and preferences for adapting their product designs and creations accordingly.

(IANS)

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The race is on: Tiger vs Man in the forests of India

Locals being axed of their ancestral lands to safeguard a tiger habitat

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Tiger
Tiger vs Man in the forests of India, credits-pixabay

Bhubaneshwar, Feb 27, 2017: In the Similipal forests, man and tiger co-exist in huge numbers. The race is now on to see which animal will win supremacy on their ‘home’.

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The indigenous villages are ripped off their rights fighting against the tigers with more clout.

Sanghamitra Dubey, an activist with an informal Indian advocacy group for forestry rights asked, “Why are indigenous people being asked outright to leave without even attempting to explore reasonable options of coexistence with wildlife?”, mentioned a report on Similipal forests by Thompson Reuters Foundation.

Dubey further highlighted the stripping of the ancestral lands of the people to protect the shrinking number of tigers and how it led to the extinction of the traditional ways of life, like the old rope plaiting technique.

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Nearly half the estimated 3200 tigers of the world are found in India, in dozens of different reserves built since the 1970s.

The tiger has more cloat than the human, Source: Pixabay

Wildlife tourism serves as a growing money maker for the country. However, conservationists continue to debate if the tourists encroach their habitat or help protect the species.

The relocation process:-

Notice: last November, to protect the Tiger habitat in the forests, hundreds of families from about 44 different villages were asked to relocate.

Anup Kumar Nayak, a senior forest officer in Bhubaneswar said, “relocations are voluntary but a number of villages around Similipal were in the ‘core’ habitat zone or so close they were “as good as inside it” and would need to move. Only the Buffer zone is for human-animal coexistence.”

Only months ago had the villagers acquired rights to the 25000 hectares of woodland area.

The Forest Rights Act of 2006 permits Tribal Households to harvest and utilize the forest resources for maintenance of their ancestral lands.

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One-off Settlement: A visit by the Park Officials was reported by the villagers in November, offering them a one-off payment to evacuate their homes and lands to clear the forest lands under human activity.

Tribandha Barja, a villager reported that most of the people refused the offer. “(They told us) take one million rupees keep it in the bank and live better with the bank interest,” Barja said.

Dubey also commented that 50 families from a neighboring village were also targeted though it was nowhere near the core zone.

As per official figures, about 2750 square kilometers of dense forests are covered by tigers reserves including bio-diverse land and adjoining forest which is used as a corridor by other animals.

According to the report by Thompson Reuters Foundation, 10,000 people are estimated to live within the park including the buffer zone by the Authorities. Also, half a million people are estimated to live in 1,200 villages within a 10km radius around the park.

The 10 year tiger conservation plan of Odisha highlights that 800 to 1000 square kilometer area is required by 80 to 100 tigers.

As pointed out by Nayak, this serves as the reason behind the relocation.

However, only 26 Royal Bengal Tigers were found by the official Odisha government in the Similipal reserve last year.

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The End of the rope plaiting : In the core of the park, in the Jamuna Garh Village, only 3 out of approximately 35 families have stayed back and decided to continue to use their land. The others chose to relocate, accepting the compensation.

One of the holdouts, Telanga Hasa said, “neighboring families had been paid one million rupees via bank deposit in September 2015 – of which 30,000 rupees was paid in cash.”

“All are still waiting to be allocated the two acres of farmland they were promised.”
“Now they have no forests, no farm land and no livelihood …how can they live with dignity?” Hasa also said that 25 families in the hillside village in Bakua had also stayed back.

The villagers are unable to access the sacred creeper ‘siali’ from which the rope os plaited. This rope, very strong, is highly demanded by farmers.

Presently, the locals have been forced to purchase plastic potato sacks for rupees three per sack for the purpose of plaiting ropes out of them. These ropes are then sold for a petty gain.

 

-By Nikita Saraf of NewsGram, Twitter: @niki_saraf

 

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Chhattisgarh: Ten Facts that will bring you closer to the Paradise of Tribal India

The untainted green woodlands spotted with beautiful waterfalls, grand levels, and winding streams offer a gala to eyes

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Chhattisgarh tribal women. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sept 04, 2016: There is an assortment of traveller spots in Chhattisgarh, a significant portion of which lie for all intents and purposes unexplored. The untainted green woodlands spotted with beautiful waterfalls, grand levels, and winding streams offer a gala to eyes.

The hollows and posts of an overlooked time change it up as vacation spots in Chhattisgarh. Bunches of wild lives cover up in the backwoods of Chhattisgarh, which possess a colossal 42% of the state’s property surface. However, not the minimum essential to specify the draw of the intriguing tribal existence of Chhattisgarh goes about as a magnet to pull in vacationer to the city of Chhattisgarh.

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The tribal state otherwise called “The Rice Bowl of India” was framed on 1 November 2000, by dividing 16 Chhattisgarhi regions of Madhya Pradesh. Chhattisgarh is the tenth biggest state with a range of 135,190 km, arranged in focal India. Because of good water system framework with massive dams and long trenches on various relentless rivers, hundreds of assortments of rice are developed in the state  and therefore it is named as The Rice Bowl of India.

The state is amazingly gifted with tribal art, Kosa silk, wax workmanship (unfortunately, that is long lost) and brims with old landmarks, magnificent untamed life and stunningly cut sanctuaries. Fundamental attractions of Chhattisgarh are Chitrakoot waterfalls, Kutumsar hollows, Ramgarh and Sita Bengra, Bamleshwari sanctuary at Dongargarh, Danteshwari temple in Dantewada and a unique Buddhist focus in Malhar town. Given copious minerals, Chhattisgarh stands out as one of the essential electrical power and steel delivering condition of India. Today, a major portion of Chhattisgarh is dealing with numerous issues- Naxalism, Witchcraft and Ailing health but it is taking steps to counter the problems as well.

Chhattisgarh is known in old writings, engravings and in travelogues of foreign vacationers as “Dakshin Kosala”. It has a noteworthy tribal populace (32.5%) in contrast to the 7.8% of the total tribal population of India. Enormously blessed with natural beauty and resources, Chhattisgarh brags of having 12% of India’s timberlands. The Vindhyachal mountain ranges administer the state. Further, stunning waterfalls add to the wild grand excellence and alongside mountains feel completely soothing to the eyes.

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Chhattisgarhi cooking styles are heavenly- rice is popular with the locals and cooked in several interesting methods. A significant portion of the conventional and tribal dishes are made of rice and rice flour like Pakhal Bhat, Kosa, Angakar Roti and Rice Flour Chapati. The tribal and urban folk appreciate local delicacy- made from a small, smooth white product of from a tree called Mahuwa. Mahuwa is a mainstream item and over the width and expansiveness of Chhattisgarh; diverse cooking styles are something to drool on- from jalebis to Safari (Barfi) and petha (sweets).

What makes Chattisgarh so interesting is that it has numerous places that have historical significance attached to it. The ten most sought after Tourist Places in Chhattisgarh are listed below:

I. Bastar: Bastar is one of the major districts in India which has the large tribal population and tattoos among the tribals are interest to many. The patterns, shapes and designs will win anyone’s heart.

II. Bilaspur: Bilaspur is better known for it’s Kosa silk and its excellent. It is the 2nd largest city in the state.

III. Sirpur: Sirpur is a small town about 84 km from Raipur, the capital of Chhattisgarh. It is well known for its archaeological monuments.

IV. Kawardha: The place of Kawardha Palace itself is wonderful. It is situated at 941 meters altitude above sea level on Maikal Ranges. Bhoramdeo Temple or the ‘Khajuraho of Chhattisgarh’, designed on the rocky stones in the Nagar style is a historical Hindu temple focused to Lord Shiva.

V. Bhilai: The zoo cum park provides various attractions, and it is one of the famous picnic spots in the state. The popular Bhilai Steel Plant was founded by Maitri Bagh.

VI. Kanker: Known earlier as Radha Niwas Bagicha, Kanker Palace was developed in the 20th century and reconstructed in the year 1937. The stylish palace shows the impact of the colonial structure.

VII. Champaran: The city of Champaran was the birthplace of Saint Vallabhacharya.

VIII. Raipur: Raipur is one of the fastest developing cities in the state of Chhattisgarh not only in the context of industry but also tourism as it is attracting tourists from every part of the nation.

IX. Ambikapur: There are some amazing appeals of Ambikapur too that attract a large number of visitors every year. Some of these include Deogarh, Ramgarh hill, Dipadih, Kailash caves, Tattapani, Semarsot and Sita Bengra, among several others. The climatic condition of Ambikapur makes the areas of the spot suitable not only for farming but also for human habitation.

X. Jashpur Waterfalls: The Rivers, Caves, and Waterfalls in Jashpur are ideal for wandering and hiking. There are adequate Tourist Destinations in Jashpur.

– by Yogiraj Mishra of NewsGram. Twitter: @yogirajmishra

 

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Diverse culture of India likely to come together in upcoming Art exhibition in Delhi

The exhibition will see on display forms of art like Bhil, Gond, Kalamkari, Kalighat, Rogan, Warli, Patchitra, Saura, Madhubani and Sanjhi art

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New Delhi, August 25, 2016: Several genres that represent harmony within the diverse culture of India will all come together in an upcoming art exhibition that will showcase tribal forms like Gond, Kalamkari and Madhubani.

Organised by Must Art Gallery and AK Gallerie, the week-long “Many Indias” art show will run at Visual Art Gallery from August 26 to August 31.

“Indigenous tribal artists from all over India will showcase the language of 12 different genres of folk and tribal art of the land,” said curator Alka Pande.

“The theoretical underpinnings of the writings of Ramachandra Guha, Arjun Appardurai and Dipesh Chakraborty, cultural historians like Jyotindra Jain, Sirish Rao, Gita Wolf and Ayyappa Paniker led me to conceive the idea of the show,” she added.

Art Exhibition. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Art Exhibition. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

“Indigenous tribal artists from all over India will showcase the language of 12 different genres of folk and tribal art of the land,” said curator Alka Pande.

“The theoretical underpinnings of the writings of Ramachandra Guha, Arjun Appardurai and Dipesh Chakraborty, cultural historians like Jyotindra Jain, Sirish Rao, Gita Wolf and Ayyappa Paniker led me to conceive the idea of the show,” she added.

“The colourful palette with which these art works are embellished bear the roots of multiplicity in India. The art works, replete with traditional knowledge, carry the hues and finesse of ancient art which are passed from one generation to the next,” the curator explained.

The exhibition will see on display forms of art like Bhil, Gond, Kalamkari, Kalighat, Rogan, Warli, Patchitra, Saura, Madhubani and Sanjhi art.

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Saura Artist Manas Das said: “As a child, I was fascinated by tribal art. I painted the walls of a house which was liked by many and hence took this as a profession. These exhibitions give me a much bigger buyer base”.

The show is an ode to indigenous art through which the audience sees an inner India and artists get exposure and promote their business.

“I tried hands on many occupations. A carpenter by trade, I was not able to make much money and was uncomfortable with the job hence took to painting and these exibitions for me are a good source of income,” said Gond Artist Shiv Prasad Malviya.

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“The indigenous art expresses a view of life which has symbiotic relationship with nature and is far removed from the structured and formal trained language. The visual representation through flora and fauna drawing ecological balance is an attempt to immortalize the beauty of nature,” said Must Art Gallery founder Tulika Kedia.

The tribal works at the exhibition, using traditional techniques of tempera and gouache, make it more interesting because each of these works are simple yet ethnically rich with aesthetic sensibility and authenticity.

The audience will identify with the motifs that carry strong symbols from nature and were originally painted in vegetable dyes and natural pigments. (IANS)

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