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Acche din: How Gautam Adani’s fortune changed when Prime Minister Narendra Modi came into power

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Modi Adani pic

By Harshmeet Singh

Gujarat. 1980s. A grey coloured Bajaj Super scooter, making rounds of the Government offices, was a common sight on the roads of Ahmedabad. While the driver, Gautam Adani, was looking for a breakthrough to make it big in life, the pillion rider, Malay Mahadevia, had the responsibility of interacting with the Government officials in fluent English. Cut to 2015. That Bajaj Super scooter owner today owns a Ferrari, a fleet of BMWs, three helicopters, three Bombardier and Beechcraft planes. And what’s more? He is considered as one of the closest aides of the country’s most powerful man – Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

For decades now, the top of the tongue examples for leading industrialists in the country have been ‘Tata, Birla & Ambani’. But in the past decade or so, this settled order has seen disruption and is taking a new shape – ‘‘Tata, Birla, Ambani & Adani’. But interestingly, while it took many decades for the other business houses to become the flag bearers of Indian industry, the Adani group managed to gain similar limelight in a relatively lesser time. All thanks to a magic wand? Or is there something else that fails to meet the eye?

Adani – Modi bonhomie

Gautam Adani’s closeness with Narendra Modi is no secret. This, perhaps, has worked in his favour. From the time Narendra Modi was declared as BJP’s Prime Ministerial candidate (13th September 2013) to even before the general elections in April – May 2014, the net market capitalization of Adani Enterprises, Adani Port and SEZ Ltd and Adani Power had risen by 85.35% to value over Rs 95,925 crore. During the same period, the jump in Sensex was 14.76%.

Having diverse interests including real estate, oil, power, gas, coal and logistics, the Adani Group is today the largest private power producer in the country. The group is also the largest private coal importer in the country and handles the largest private port in India at Mundra.

By the time Modi took over as the Chief Minister of Gujarat in 2001, the Adani Group had transformed into an infrastructure company, leaving behind its humble beginnings as an export house. Under fire after the Godhra riots and the devastating Bhuj earthquake in the state that took place soon after he assumed office, Modi tried to divert everyone’s attention by asking the industrial houses to invest in the state. While Modi’s first such call was overlooked by most of the industrialists, it was a group of Gujarati businessmen, flocking behind Gautam Adani who ensured that Modi’s idea of an industrial Gujarat didn’t become a flop. Since then, Adani-Modi duo has been inseparable.

Modi the PM – Adani’s saviour

In January last year, the Gujarat High Court declared Adani owned Mundra SEZ in Gujarat as ‘illegal’. The High Court found that the SEZ was built without attaining the requisite environmental clearances. According to the law, the central environment ministry needs to approve the project before the construction of SEZ can begin. The Supreme Court declined to change the High Court’s order but allowed the existing tenants to continue working in the SEZ.

Realizing that the closing down of the SEZ would results in heavy loss of job and infrastructure, the High Court allowed the Central Government to look into the matter and grant a belated clearance, if it finds it satisfactory. While the UPA government didn’t take a decision on the issue, the Modi Government, within a couple of months of assuming office, gave the required clearances and prepared the ground for upcoming ‘Achche din’ for Adani.

Modi’s travel companion

While Narendra Modi’s frequent foreign tours have caught the attention of everyone in the country, co-travellers during such trips have remained under the wraps. During PM’s recent trip to France, Adani was amongst the audience in the UNESCO when Modi took the stage to deliver a speech. Some sources say that Adani also interacted with Nicolas Sarkozy, the former French President. He was also spotted with the Prime Minister during his trips to Australia, Japan, Brazil and the USA. The PM’s UNGA (United Nations’ General Assembly) speech was also heard by him in person in New York.

Even when Modi undertook tours to China, Singapore and Japan as Gujarat’s chief minister, Adani was a permanent fixture with him.

The latest in the line of Adani’s blockbuster deals during Modi’s tenure was reported in China a couple of days back. Business deals worth $22 billion were signed during Modi’s China visit, a majority of which were bagged by Adani and Bharti. Through these deals, Adani group is hoping to gather finance for its upcoming power projects at the Mundra port in Gujarat.

CAG posed questions to the Gujarat Government

In July last year, the CAG came out with 5 reports highlighting the undue favours given by the Gujarat Government to business houses such as Adani Group and Reliance Petroleum in the financial year ending in March 2013 (Modi was the Gujarat CM then).

According to the report, “non-monitoring of the construction quay in phase 1 of Adani Group-owned Mundra port led to short recovery of Rs 118.12 crore.” Unsurprisingly, no action was taken on the report and it was dumped without giving much attention.

SBI’s $1 billion loan to Adani

One of the most controversial deals that the Adani Group has been a part of since Modi took over as the PM was SBI’s approval of a $1 billion line of credit for its coal mine project in Australia’s Queensland. The largest state run bank in the country faced flak from many corners after signing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Adani Group on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Australia.

Considering that some of best known International Banks such as Goldman Sachs, Royal Bank of Scotland, Barclays and Citigroup have stayed away from the project, citing environmental reasons, SBI’s decision seems all the more surprising and fishy. But then this isn’t the first time when the public sector Banks are being pushed to risk a bad credit due to political pressure.

While the Government maintains that the Australian project would help get the much needed coal into India for power production, a number of Australian organizations are already up in arms against it due to the possible damage it would cause to the Great Barrier Reef.

According to some news reports that surfaced a couple of months back, SBI decided to reject the loan request, although SBI marked such news as ‘rumours’ and continued to say that the final decision is still pending approval from the executive committee.

There is no fault in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s policy of pushing development in the country. But a country of over 120 crore people can’t flourish if the benefits of ‘development’ remain confined to the old and close aides of the people in power. Even if all the allegations of Modi’s friendship with Adani are false, it surely doesn’t give a positive signal when the Prime Minister is seen far more often with a particular industrial baron than with the Aam Aadmi.

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Beatles, Apple, Facebook knew India more than Indians

Famous non-Indian celebrities know more about India and its past

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The Beatles once visited India to know more bout its past and culture.
The Beatles once visited India to know more bout its past and culture. Wikipedia

-By Salil Gewali

Facebook’s Chairman Mark Zuckerberg had dropped a bombshell on the “secularists” in India during PM Modi’s visit to his campus in California. It’s all about the Facebook connection with India. Initially, it was never a bed of roses for what is now a household name “FACEBOOK” across the world. This world-famous ‘social networking service company’ had its own share of bad times. Revealing for the first time in the meeting at the Facebook office upbeat Zuckerberg told PM Narendra Modi that Steve Jobs, the founder Chairman of Apple, had advised him to visit a certain temple in India for blessings. The revelation may have caused heartburn to many. More so in India where so-called secular and snooty folks have long acquired a proclivity to look down upon their own culture, religion, and values while being appreciative of any bizarre customs and styles of the West. Yes, heeding the advice of his mentor Steve Jobs the depressed Mark had visited the temple and toured around India for nearly a month.

Facebook's CEO tells about India.
Facebook’s CEO tells about India. wikipedia

Well, the American techno-wizard Steve Jobs had himself spent over six months in India in 1974. He was here in quest of the higher meaning of life and spiritual solace. As understood, from early age Steve was quite haunted by a good deal of unanswered questions. Of course, his encounter with a book “Be Here Now” by Richard Alpert, a Harvard Professor, had opened up a gateway to the spiritualism of the East. This book had also introduced him to a mystic Yogi ‘Neem Karoli Baba’. That later inspired Steve to set out the journey for the East. As soon as Steve and his friend Daniel Kottke arrived India they directly went to meet the Guru in Kainchi Dham Ashram in Nainital. But to their disappointment, they found the Baba had already passed away some months earlier. Nevertheless, the urge to dive deeper into the spiritualism did not die away. They shaved their heads and put on Indian clothes and undertook an extensive meditation and yogic practices.

The most significant impact that had made upon Steve’s life was a book “Autobiography of a Yogi”by Paramhansa Yogananda. It is on record that he would read this book too frequently, at least once every year until his death, 2011. This book had given him the practical insight into what exactly this world is about and how a layman can prepare himself to realize the Supreme knowledge. The first-hand account of a Yogi with empirical approaches to know oneself this book by Yogananda is a smash hit manual now among the seekers of the Eastern spiritualism.

Yes, by dint of hard work, intuition and innovation Steve stood out as one of the most successful techno-tycoons of the modern times. As much known, Jobs was hardly possessed by the luxury of riches and materialistic vanity. He just regarded his entrepreneurship as a tool to awaken his dormant potentialities. The chairman of Salesforce.com and famous philanthropist Marc Benioff says with conviction — “If you want to understand Steve, it’s a good idea to dig into ‘Autobiography of a Yogi’.” It is this book which Steve’s family had given to all the guests as a last gift at his memorial service.

Here we can’t afford to ignore the Beatle’s fascination for INDIA as well. The band members that were basking in the opulence of materialistic riches and glory visited India (Rishikesh) in search of inner peace. They met with Sri Maharshi Mahesh Yogi and learnt from him Transcendental meditation (TM) who laid bare methods to feel true bliss within. Sri Maharshi is a big name in the West having a huge following that includes celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, David Lynch, Russell Brand, Hugh Jackman, Jennifer Aniston, Modern physicist Dr. John Hagelin, to name a few. The Beatle’s Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr often assist a Hollywood Director/actor David Lynch to organize the Transcendental meditation under ‘David Lynch Foundation’ across USA and the European countries. George Harrison later took refuge in Bhakti Yoga. The founder of ISKCON Srila Prabhupada showed him the pathway to the Supreme Consciousness.

What basically pulls the rational westerners to India is less known to Indians themselves. It’s shamefully paradoxical. From early 19th Century, the philosophical literary treasure troves and Yoga of India found more admirers in the foreign lands than at home. Indeed, the philosophy of the “laws of karma” and the presence of all-power-divinity within every being and everywhere — which any human being can realize irrespective of one’s caste, creed, nationality, and color, has intensely stirred the greatest of the great minds of the West. The ancient texts hold out a whole bunch of keys to unlock oneself and know his/her relationship with the Supreme Being which in fact seems very reasonable to the West. Further, the complex studies of world-view by Modern scientists are gradually arriving at the same conclusion what the ancient sages of India expounded over five thousands year back that ‘creation and creator are ONE’. Interconnection, inter-relation and interdependence among every individual particle/object, living or non-living, in the infinite universe — which is the fundamental tenets of the Eastern philosophy, provided a new light of wisdom to the the modern physicists like Schrödinger, Heisenberg, Julius Oppenheimer, Brain David Josephson, David Bohm, John Stewart Bell et al.

Well, Indian’s contribution to the western academia is immeasurable — though deliberately undermined or less discussed in India itself. It’s very worthwhile to recall a famous proclamation by our western master whom we hold in the highest esteem. TS Eliot, one of the most celebrated poets of the 20th century, asserts: “Indian philosophers’ subtleties make most of the great European philosophers look like schoolboys”.

Salil Gewali is a well-known writer and author of ‘Great minds on India’. Twitter @SGewali.

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Narendra Modi App : Amazing Platform where Prime Minister connects with the citizens

Wanna give ideas to or interact with Prime Minister Narendra Modi? Go and download Narendra Modi app on android and iOs

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Narendra Modi App
Prime Minister Narendra Modi (FILE PHOTO)

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has an amazing sense of connecting with masses. Prime Minister knows the nerve of Indian public and at various instances proves himself as a pan Indian leader. Prime Minster Modi is undoubtedly one of the most tech-savvy global leader and a big promoter of e-governance and m-governance since a long time. Within two months of assuming Prime Minister-ship, he had launched the ambitious myGov project. In continuing the tradition of citizen connect, Prime Minister Modi took another step towards connecting with the people at their convenience by launching Narendra Modi app couple of years back.

Narendra Modi app
Prime Minister launching Narendra Modi App

The Narendra Modi app provides updates on the day-to-day activities of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. It presents an opportunity to receive messages and emails directly from Shri Narendra Modi. There is also an option to contribute and earn ‘badges’ through to-do tasks in various social initiatives. Through Narendra Modi app, one can tune-in and listen to the various episodes of ‘Mann ki Baat’, read Prime Minister Modi’s blogs, and get to know more about him from his Biography section. Narendra Modi app also provides comprehensive information on initiatives and achievements of the Union Government, which has an ‘infographics’ section for insights.

Such type of initiative by a global leader gives a strong message how technology can be used by governments to bridge gap between leaders and citizens. apart from this app Prime Minister Modi is also very much active on various social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc. Prime Minister Modi is the one of the most followed global leader on Twitter.

So what are you waiting for. Go and share some ideas of innovation with Prime Minister Narendra Modi and contribute in his vision of “Sabka Sath, Sabka Vikas”.

– by SHAURYA RITWIK, Shaurya is Sub-Editor at NewsGram and writes on Geo-politcs, Culture, Indology and Business. Twitter Handle – @shauryaritwik

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Cleaning of Ganga is not impossible, but it is very difficult.

The holy river is also one of the most polluted river

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Ganga in Haridwar
A pile of garbage lies on the riverbank along the Ganges riverfront known as "Har ki Pauri," the most sacred spot in the Hindu holy town of Haridwar where devotees throng. VOA

– Saket Suman

About five years ago, when Financial Times journalist and author Victor Mallet began living in Delhi, he was shocked to discover that the Yamuna — “this beautiful river of Indian legend and art” — was chocked with untreated sewage and industrial waste after it had passed through the city on its way to Mathura, Agra and on to join the Ganga at Allahabad He wondered “how a river so sacred to so many Indians could also be so polluted and neglected” and then set out to record the plight of the Ganga.

His exhaustive journey led him to various key locations on the river, including its source at Gaumukh and Sagar Island and the Sunderbans at its mouth in the Bay of Bengal. This culminated in the publication of “River of Life, River of Death” (Oxford University Press/Rs 550/316 pages).

“My conclusion is that it is not impossible (to clean the Ganga) — but it is very difficult. Narendra Modi is the latest of several Indian prime ministers to announce plans to rescue the Ganga — in fact, I would say he has been the most fervent — but like his predecessors, he has struggled to implement these plans despite the availability of funds from India itself and from international donors such as the World Bank and Japan.

“Clearly, the Ganga has enormous problems of physical pollution from sewage, industrial toxins and pesticide run-off. Too much of the water is diverted for irrigation in the dry season, which can leave parts of the river without water before the monsoon. But with political will and public support — I don’t think anyone in India objects to saving the river — it can be done,” Mallet told IANS in an email interview from Hong Kong.

The important thing, he maintained, is to change mindsets and he noted in this context that it is quite common among devout Hindus to say: “Ma Ganga is so spiritually pure that nothing we throw in the river will sully her or make a difference.”

The author said that sensible holy men and environmentalists who care for the Ganga term this as nonsense — and the reason it’s not true is that the Ganga’s very spiritual power arises from its physical properties as a life-giver, as a provider of water and fertility.

“That’s why rivers have always been worshipped in ancient times, including in England. So if you destroy the river’s life-giving qualities through pollution, you destroy the source of her spiritual importance,” he added.

In the book, he also states that it is not impossible to clean the Ganges, “as river clean-ups in Europe and America have shown”.

Elaborating on this, he said: “When I was a child living in London, my mother always told me not to fall in the Thames because the river was so filthy that if I fell in I would have to go to hospital and have my stomach pumped! Yet today the Thames is clean — muddy, but virtually free of industrial pollution and untreated sewage — because successive governments and water and sanitation companies have stopped the pollution.

“The same is true of the Rhine in continental Europe and the Chicago river in the United States. The great thing about rivers is that you don’t have to scrub them clean — you just have to stop polluting them and the natural flow of the river does the rest.”

Mallet maintained that the record on the Ganga has so far been disappointing in terms of implementation, but hoped that there will be a change now that there is a new minister in charge.

“If you clean the Ganga by improving sanitation, you not only save the goddess, you also create thousands of jobs in infrastructure development, and save the lives of thousands of children who die each year because of bad water, poor hygiene and stomach bugs. Likewise, if India curbs its greenhouse gases — and this seems to be happening anyway because alternative energy such as solar power is now very competitive on price — then that will also help it to reduce the kind of air pollution that has recently been afflicting Delhi and the whole of North India,” he maintained.

Mallet went on to add that he learnt a lot about the mythology and the history of the river — and the history of India — in the course of his research for the book.

“In a way, India is so rich in civilisations and stories that you can never say you have completed your work as a researcher and writer. You can at least make a start, and also explain the contemporary political, social, religious and environmental issues that affect the river and the country as a whole,” Mallet said. (IANS)