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Adnan Sami in a fix, Pakistan refuses to confirm renunciation of nationality


Islamabad: Days after the Centre allowed famous Pakistani singer Adnan Sami to stay in India on humanitarian grounds till further orders, Pakistan on Wednesday refused to confirm his renunciation of nationality over his alleged disrespectful behaviour towards his national identity.

The latest move could hurt Sami’s efforts to adopt the Indian nationality.

The authorities in Pakistan have refused to issue the “renunciation of citizenship certificate” to the famous singer, The Express Tribune reported. The certificate is necessary for any Pakistani citizen who wants to adopt the citizenship of any other country.

“Why would we issue the certificate to a man who has no respect for ‘sacred’ documents,” a senior officer of Pakistan’s Home ministry told the daily.

“The Pakistani singer would now have to submit an unconditional apology for his behaviour and follow the correct procedure for getting the renunciation certificate,” officials said.

Minister of State for Home Kiren Rijiju had on August 4 informed the Lok Sabha that the singer was exempted from deportation proceedings under section 3 of the Foreigners Act.

“…in pursuance of the powers conferred under section 3A of Foreigners Act, 1946 (31 of 1946), the central government being of the opinion that it is necessary and expedient in public interest to do so, hereby declared that provisions of clauses (c) and (e) of sub-section (2) of section 3 of the Foreigners Act 1946 and paragraph 11 of the Foreigners Order, 1948, shall not apply to Adnan Sami Khan, son of late Arshad Sami Khan, and he is exempted from deportation proceedings. This order shall remain valid until further orders are issued on the subject,” the home ministry order said.

The 46-year-old singer, who gave hit songs like ‘Kabhi to nazar milao’ and ‘Lift karaa de’, had appealed for the legalisation of his stay in the country in May this year.

He submitted a representation to the home ministry on May 26, 2015, requesting for his stay in India on humanitarian grounds.

Sami, who came to India on a visitor’s visa, had been staying in India since March 2001. His visa was extended from time to time, but as his passport expired in May this year and the Pakistani government refused to renew it, he was forced to request the Indian authorities to legalise his stay in the country on humanitarian grounds.

(With inputs from agencies)

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Pentavalent vaccine: Doctors raise red flag

In spite of the data presented in this paper from a large cohort, the authors point out that the evidence is merely circumstantial and not conclusive

the new Hepatitis B vaccine for adults is called Heplisav-B.
India's PV to be reexamined because of its harmful effects. .
  • Pentavalent vaccine was introduced in India six years ago
  • It is since then have been a cause of many deaths
  • Doctors want it to be reexamined before continuing its use

Pentavalent vaccine (PV), that was introduced by India a little over six years ago, doubled the deaths of children soon after vaccination compared to the DPT (Diphtheria-Pertussis-Tetanus) vaccine, according to a new study that calls for a “rigorous review of the deaths following vaccination with PV”.

Health officials have launched a campaign targeting nearly 24 million people with a one-fifth dose of the vaccine. Wikimedia Commons
PV has been cause of many deaths in past years. Wikimedia Commons

Government records show that there were 10,612 deaths following vaccination (both PV and DPT) in the last 10 years. There was a huge increase in these numbers in 2017, which the Health Ministry has promised to study. “The present analysis could be a starting point in the quest to reduce the numbers of such deaths,” authors of the new study say.

The study by Dr Jacob Puliyel, Head of Pediatrics at St Stephens Hospital, and Dr V. Sreenivas, Professor of Biostatistics at the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), both in New Delhi, is published in the peer-reviewed Medical Journal of Dr D.Y. Patil University.

PV is a combination of the DPT vaccine and two more vaccines against Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) and hepatitis B. Starting December 2011, PV was introduced into India’s immunisation programme to replace DPT vaccine in a staged manner with a view to adding protection against Hib and Hepatitis B without increasing the number of injections given to infants.

Doctors have raised concerns over these vaccines. Wikimedia Commons
Doctors have raised concerns over these vaccines. Wikimedia Commons

But sporadic reports of unexplained deaths following immunisation with PV had been a matter of concern. Puliyel, Sreenivas and their colleagues undertook the study to find out if these deaths were merely coincidental or vaccine-induced.

The authors obtained data of all deaths reported from April 2012 to May 2016 under the Right to Information Act. Data on deaths within 72 hours of administering DPT and PV from different states were used.

For their study, the authors assumed that all deaths within 72 hours of receiving DPT are natural deaths. Using this figure as the baseline, they presumed that any increase in the number of deaths above this baseline among children receiving PV must be caused by this vaccine.

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According to their analysis of the data provided by the government, there were 237 deaths within 72 hours of administering the Pentavalent vaccine — twice the death rate among infants who received DPT vaccine.

Extrapolating the data, the authors have estimated that vaccination of 26 million children each year in India would result in 122 additional deaths within 72 hours, due to the switch from DPT to PV.

“There is likely to be 7,020 to 8,190 deaths from PV each year if data from states with the better reporting, namely Manipur and Chandigarh, are projected nationwide,” their report says.

It is important to make sure that these vaccines are reexamined peroperly. VOA

The authors note that while the study looks at the short-term increase in deaths (within three days of vaccination) it does not calculate the potential benefits of PV on infant mortality, for example by protection against lethal diseases like Haemophilus influenza.

In spite of the data presented in this paper from a large cohort, the authors point out that the evidence is merely circumstantial and not conclusive. “These findings of differential death rates between DPT and PV do call for further rigorous prospective population-based investigations,” the study concludes. IANS