Wednesday May 23, 2018
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Assam flood toll hits 13, CM undertakes aerial visit

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Guwahati: The flood situation across Assam continued to be grim as the toll rose to 13 on Sunday and 18 districts still remain inundated, officials said. Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi on Sunday undertook an aerial survey of the worst affected districts of Kokrajhar, Chirang, Bongaigaon, Goalpara and Dhubri. A total of 1,291 villages have been submerged so far, affecting 6.16 lakh people. The district administrations have opened 260 relief camps, housing 1.79 lakh people. Gogoi asked the concerned departments to expedite rescue and relief operations in all the flood-hit areas.

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He praised the National Disaster Response Force and the army for their efforts in rescuing marooned people, and said ministers and officials have fanned out to the affected areas and were monitoring the relief operation. The chief minister said the first priority of his government was providing relief to the flood-hit people. He said he has instructed the deputy commissioners of the affected districts to leave no stone unturned to extend all possible help to the affected people, especially children and women. “Restoration of surface communication and repair of breached embankments have also been accorded priorities,” he said. Gogoi slammed the BJP-led central government, saying it was yet to release a sizable chunk of funds sought by the state for infrastructure damage caused by floods last year.

“The Center has only released Rs.380 crore so far. We submitted memorandum to the central government including the prime minister and the home minister, but we have not received the funds sought by us for huge infrastructure damage caused by floods last year,” he said. Gogoi said there are no funds constraints in providing relief to the affected people. “We have funds for relief work. What we require from the central government is sufficient funds for building infrastructure such as roads, bridges, school buildings, health centers, houses and embankments damaged by floods last year and proper rehabilitation of the flood-hit people,” Gogoi said.

In a memorandum to Home Minister Rajnath Singh in October last year, Gogoi sought Rs.2,010 crore for damaged infrastructure. The state also demanded Rs.660 crore for rescue and relief operations. Besides, Rs.6,700 crore was sought as special assistance, which included Rs.3,500 crore for raising and strengthening of embankments and Rs.1,000 crore for mitigating flood problems in Guwahati city. Gogoi said the state government would prepare an assessment report highlighting the damage only after the flood waters recede.

(IANS)

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Greenland Is Melting

If all the ice covering the world’s largest island were to thaw, sea levels would rise roughly 6 meters

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FILE - An iceberg is seen melting off the coast of Ammasalik, Greenland, July 19, 2007. VOA
  • Greenland is slowly melting
  • This melting adds roughly 1 millimetre of water per year to global sea levels
  • This can mean huge floods in coming years

Like a bowling ball on a skating rink, the black geodesic sphere of the East Greenland Ice-Core Project’s communal living space stands out against the endless white nothingness of the Greenland ice sheet.

 

Iceberg melting can cause huge floods in coming years.
Iceberg melting can cause huge floods in coming years.

But the real action at East GRIP is under the surface. Researchers are drilling through more than 2.5 kilometres of ice, down to the bedrock below. The ice is sliding fast — for a glacier — toward the sea. Scientists here want to know why. The answer may hold clues to the future of the world’s coastal cities.

Greenland is melting. As it melts, it adds roughly 1 millimetre of water per year to global sea levels. And the pace of melting is quickening.

If all the ice covering the world’s largest island were to thaw, sea levels would rise roughly 6 meters. Scientists don’t know how fast, or how likely, that is to happen. East GRIP is looking for evidence to inform both those questions.

The answers are a matter of growing urgency. The seas are rising faster. And the same processes at work on Greenland’s glaciers at the top of the world could send vast sections of Antarctica’s ice sheet into the sea as well, raising ocean levels even further.

Melting of icebergs is increasing sea levels every year. VOA
Melting of icebergs is increasing sea levels every year. VOA

Also Read: Earth was like Mars? Experts find fossils in Greenland dating back to 3.7 Billion Years

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. Scientists studying the rapid changes gather in the small Greenland town of Kangerlussuaq, a former U.S. military base built during World War II. Through the Cold War, this outpost supplied remote radar sites watching a nuclear attack coming over the pole.

These days, military transport planes fly scientists and their equipment across 1,000 kilometres of Arctic ice to East GRIP. They make research possible here and at other far-flung scientific outposts on the vast Greenland ice sheet.

Departing from Kangerlussuaq, VOA visited East GRIP and other remote corners of Greenland with the 109th Airlift Wing of the U.S. Air National Guard for a firsthand look at science in action at the leading edge of climate change. VOA

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