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Auto-rickshaw driver takes humanity to new heights, disposes claimed/unclaimed bodies

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Bhubaneshwar: An auto-rickshaw driver, also a school dropout, took humanity and service to society on a whole new level by disposing of claimed and unclaimed bodies; living his life on the motto “Service to mankind is service to God”.

Meet Pradeep Kumar Prusty, the unknown friend of the dead, who has made it his life’s mission to ensure they get a dignified burial. He is always the first to come forward to recover or collect corpses found along the railway tracks, roads and bodies hanging from trees in this Odisha capital and on its outskirts.

Prusty, 40, is always there for the police to collect the bodies and take them to the mortuary for identification and autopsy.

“When I was in school, I used to visit the municipality hospital nearby my school to get digestive tablets as they tasted sweet. I would see the agony of the family members who could not dispose of the bodies of their near and dear due to lack of money. That inspired me to help these poor people,” Prusty, who has studied till the ninth grade, told reporters.

Hailing from Bhubaneswar’s Bhimtangi neighborhood, Prusty has disposed off 600-700 claimed and unclaimed bodies since 2009, when he started the noble service.

He is called every time a claimed or unclaimed body is found in the city. Believing in humanity, he never hesitates to collect corpses found on tracks or an unclaimed decomposed body. He is there at a call to extend his helping hand to the police.

His job, however, does not end there. He is with a mission “to ensure the dignity of the dead.” He provides all possible help to people who need help to perform the last rites and the cremation of their loved ones.

“I earn about Rs 7000 to Rs 8000 monthly by driving an auto-rickshaw in the city. I spend half of the money for collection and cremation of the bodies and another half for the family,” said Prusty, who has a son and a daughter. While his son is studying in Class 8, his daughter is in Class 12. His wife is a homemaker.

He said when he falls short of money, he collects funds from the people to dispose of the corpses, adding that about Rs 2000 is required for the cremation of dead bodies.

Irrespective of the jurisdiction of the administration and class, creed, caste, class or colour, he is always there in the true letter and spirit of a good Samaritan.

And, he never demands anything in return.

Much prior to the state government’s free ambulance service, Prusty started one in 2007.

“I sold off my ambulance after it broke down. I had no money to repair it. So, I had no option but to sell it off,” said the good Samaritan.

Not surprisingly, his social work has earned him much felicitation and awards of appreciation from many organizations. (Chinmaya Dehury, IANS)

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Hawking treated Artificial Intelligence as threat to humanity

Hawking's theory lies upon the assumption that the universe has no boundaries

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Scientist Stephen Hawking giving his views on the danger of Artificial Intelligence (AI)
Scientist Stephen Hawking giving his views on the danger of Artificial Intelligence (AI)
  • Stephen Hawking passed away on March 14th, 2018
  • He treated AI always as a threat to humanity
  • There were many arguments he presented to support his point

Award-winning physicist Professor Stephen Hawking, who died on Wednesday, always warned against Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its growing dominance over humanity.

“Earth is becoming too small and humanity is bound to self-destruct, with AI replacing us as the dominant being on the planet,” he told wired.com in November 2017.

There are many good uses of AI, but it can be misused too.
There are many good uses of AI, but it can be misused too.

“I fear that AI may replace humans altogether. If people design computer viruses, someone will design AI that improves and replicates itself. This will be a new form of life that outperforms humans,” Hawking said.

The theoretical physicist kept on saying in the past that that developments in AI have been so great that the machines will one day be more dominant than human beings.

He noted that a new space programme should be humanity’s top priority “with a view to eventually colonising suitable planets for human habitation”.

“I believe we have reached the point of no return. Our earth is becoming too small for us, global population is increasing at an alarming rate and we are in danger of self-destructing,” Hawking warned.

In 2016, at the opening of Cambridge University’s AI centre, Professor Hawking said that AI could either be the best or worst invention humanity has ever made. Earlier in March, the renowned British physicist said there was nothing around before the Big Bang.

Speaking during a TV talk show “Star Talk” on National Geographic Channel, Hawking propounded his theory on what happened before the universe came into existence. Hawking’s theory lies upon the assumption that the universe has no boundaries. During the show, Hawking argued that before the Big Bang, real ordinary time was replaced by imaginary time and was in a bent form.

AI has the potential to increase India's annual growth.
AI can harm humanity: Hawking. Pixabay

“It was always reaching closer to nothing but didn’t become nothing,” he said. Further, Hawking drew an analogy between the distorted time with Ancient Greek philosopher Euclid’s theory of space-time, a closed surface without end.

Taking the example of Earth, he said: “One can regard imaginary and real-time beginning at the South Pole … There is nothing south of the South Pole, so there was nothing around before the Big Bang.”

Also Read:Humanity’s days are numbered, Artificial Intelligence (AI) will cause mass extinction, warns Stephen Hawking

“There was never a Big Bang that produced something from nothing. It just seemed that way from mankind’s perspective,” Hawking said, hinting that a lot of what we believe is derived from a human-centric perspective, which might limit the scope of human knowledge of the world. IANS