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Average internet connection speed globally increases by 23 percent

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image source: www.yourvamentor.com

New Delhi: The global average internet connection speed increased 23 per cent to 5.6 Mbps in the quarter ended December 2015 compared to the same period of 2014, a report said on Wednesday. to 5.6.

The report “Fourth Quarter, 2015, State of the Internet Report” was released by Akamai Technologies Inc., a global leader in content delivery network services.

“From a global perspective, the average connection speed increased 8.6 per cent quarter-over-quarter and 23 per cent year-over-year to 5.6 Mbps, while the global average peak connection speed increased 1 per cent QoQ, and increased 21 per cent YoY to 32.5 Mbps,” it said.

South Korea had the highest average connection speed in the Asia-Pacifi­c region at 26.7 Mbps, while India had the lowest at 2.8 Mbps.

“This quarter’s (October to December 2015) report shows great YoY growth in average connection speeds and overall broadband adoption,” said David Belson, editor of the report.

South Korea (95.3 Mbps) and Macao (83.1 Mbps) were the only countries/regions to post double-digit quarterly gains in average peak connection speed at 10 percent and 13 per cent, respectively.

“This is particularly important as consumer expectations rise and many high-profile events, like the summer games in Rio, will be streamed this year.

“The progress we are seeing across our key metrics shows that, while there’s still work to be done, more parts of the world are increasingly able to support the delivery of broadcast-quality video content online,” he added.

The report also showed each of the top 10 countries/regions saw double-digit growth in 25 Mbps broadband adoption except Hong Kong, which posted a 9.8 per cent change quarter-over-quarter. Norway and Denmark saw the greatest yearly gains, the report cited.

On a global basis, close to 70 per cent of the countries/regions saw a QoQ increase in unique IPv4 address counts in the last three months of 2015, up 10 per cent from the July-September period of 2015.

The report also pointed out that 43 countries/regions saw IPv4 address counts grow 10 per cent or more in the quarter ended December 2015 while 13 saw counts decline 10 per cent or more compared with the July-September quarter of 2015.

The report also showed Britain had the fastest average mobile connection speed at 26.8 Mbps with Spain in second place at 14 Mbps. Iran had the lowest average connection speed, at 1.3 Mbps, followed by Vietnam with an average connection speed of 1.8 Mbps.(IANS)

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High-Speed Encryption to Help in Fighting Against Future Cyber Threats

Scientists have developed a new system with features of high-speed encryption that will ensure protection against future cyber threats

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High-speed encryption
High-speed encryption will ensure protection from future cyber threats. Pixabay.

New York, Nov 27: In a bid to fight against the future cyber threats, scientists have developed a new system with high-speed encryption properties that drives quantum computers to create theoretically hack-proof forms of data encryption.

The novel system is capable of creating and distributing encryption codes at megabit-per-second rates, which is five to 10 times faster than existing methods and on par with current internet speeds when running several systems in parallel.

The technique is secure from common attacks, even in the face of equipment flaws that could open up leaks.

“We are now likely to have a functioning quantum computer that might be able to start breaking the existing cryptographic codes in the near future,” said Daniel Gauthier, Professor at The Ohio State University.

“We really need to be thinking hard now of different techniques that we could use for trying to secure the internet,” Gauthier added, in the paper appearing in the journal Science Advances.

For the new system to work, both the hacker as well as the sender must have access to the same key, and it must be kept secret.

The novel system uses a weakened laser to encode information or transmit keys on individual photons of light, but also packs more information onto each photon, making the technique faster.

By adjusting the time at which the photon is released, and a property of the photon called the phase, the new system can encode two bits of information per photon instead of one.

This trick, paired with high-speed detectors powers the system to transmit keys five to 10 times faster than other methods.

“It was changing these additional properties of the photon that allowed us to almost double the secure key rate that we were able to obtain if we hadn’t done that,” Gauthier said. (IANS)