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Punarjeevan and Pink Chain take up arms against the deadliest disease, Cancer



By Ishan Kukreti

In a major endeavor to create awareness about cancer and initiate a constructive dialogue within the society about the same, ‘Pink Chain Cancer Conclave’ was held at the Constitution Club of India on 25th June.

The conclave, which was an initiative by the NGO Punarjeevan, saw discussions on topics relevant to present day ground realities related to the disease and ways to deal with them.

Talking about the causes of cancer, Dr. G.K. Rath, chief of IRCH informed the gathering that while tobacco accounted for 40% of all cancer cases, it is preventable too. If one avoids tobacco in any form, chances of developing cancer drops by 40%.

                                        Dr. G.K. Rath


Throwing light on the issue of tobacco addiction among young adults, Dr. Harit Chaturvedi, Chairman Max Oncology, said that people who start smoking at a young age are at a higher risk of getting addicted. One of the discussions focused on the inclusion of chapters on smoking and its relation to cancer in school books, to sensitize young adults about the ill effects of tobacco.

Dr. Harit Chaturvedi


“The present budget allocations to the healthcare sector in India are abysmally low. Plus, a major chunk of the work in India is toeing the line of western concerns. For example, most of the efforts in cancer healthcare for women is directed towards Breast cancer, because it is a global phenomenon. However, Cervical cancer which to this day claims the highest number female lives remains largely overlooked,” a highly dedicated and equally concerned President of Punarjeevan, Dr. Abhishek Shankar told NewsGram.

Dr. Abhishek Shankar
Dr. Abhishek Shankar
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New AI system can diagnose prostate cancer just good as pathologists

"The system was programmed to learn and gradually improve how it interpreted the samples. Our result show that the diagnosis the AI reported was at a level comparable to that of a pathologist"

Chronic diseases can cause cancer as well.
Chronic diseases can cause cancer as well.
  • This new AI can identify cancer just as accurately as a pathology lab
  • This app can overcome the shortage of pathologists
  • The app is very useful and revolutionary

Researchers have developed a new learning artificial intelligence (AI) system which can diagnose and identify cancerous prostate samples as accurately as any pathologist.

Chronic diseases are not yet included in cancer prevention schemes.
New mobile app can detect cancer.

According to the researchers, this holds out the possibility of streamlining and eliminating variation in the process of cancer diagnosis. It may also help overcome any local shortage of trained pathologists.

“This is not going to replace a human pathologist. We still need an experienced pathologist to take responsibility for the final diagnosis,” said lead author Hongqian Guo from the Nanjing University in China.

Also Read: Girls may inherit ovarian cancer gene from fathers

“What it will do is help pathologists make better, faster diagnosis, as well as eliminating the day-to-day variation in judgement which can creep into human evaluations,” Guo added.

For the study, presented at the 33rd European Association of Urology Congress in Copenhagen, researchers took 918 prostate whole mount pathology section samples from 283 patients, and ran these through the analysis system, with the software gradually learning and improving diagnosis.

These pathology images were subdivided into 40,000 smaller samples; 30,000 of these samples were used to ‘train’ the software, the remaining 10,000 were used to test accuracy.

The results showed an accurate diagnosis in 99.38 percent of cases (using a human pathologist as a ‘gold standard’), which is effectively as accurate as the human pathologist.

The app is just as effective as a pathologist. Pixabay

They were also able to identify different Gleason Grades in the pathology sections using AI; ten whole mount prostate pathology sections have been tested so far, with similar Gleason Grade in the AI and human pathologist’s diagnosis. The group has not started testing the system with human patients.

“The system was programmed to learn and gradually improve how it interpreted the samples. Our result show that the diagnosis the AI reported was at a level comparable to that of a pathologist. “Furthermore, it could accurately classify the malignant levels of prostate cancer,” Guo added. IANS