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‘Baul’ Singer Pradip Bauri arrested for theft of Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel Prize Medal in 2004

After 12 years from the theft of Tagore's Nobel Medallion, finally the case experiences some progress!

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Rabindranath Tagore. Wikimedia
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Kolkata, Nov 25, 2016: A ‘baul’ singer has been taken into police custody for his suspected association in the theft of Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel Prize medal in 2004, a CID officer stated today.

Pradip Bauri, a folk singer, was picked up by the Special Investigation Team (SIT) from Ruppur village in Birbhum district earlier this month, the official said on condition of anonymity, mentioned PTI.

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“We are almost sure about his involvement. He arranged safe passage for others to move stolen items from Santiniketan to somewhere else. Though he has denied it we have decided to put him under narco-analysis test on Wednesday. We have already received court permission,” said the SIT official.

Bauri was locked up for nearly two weeks by the CBI during its investigation into the case.

PTI reports mentioned, it was clear after questioning Bauri that he had knowledge of the entire episode and others involved in the heist, he said.

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Bauri, who had presided over the gram panchayat of Ruppur from 1998 to 2003 had provided shelter to the culprits involved in stealing the medal and also helped them disappear, believe officials

Following his enquiry, it has been disclosed that a Bangladeshi national, Mohammed Hossain Shipul, was the mastermind of the plan and two Europeans were also involved in it, the SIT officer added.

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West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee had declared in August that if the state government was given the responsibility, it could try to retrieve the Nobel medallion stolen from a museum of Visva Bharati University. The medal has great historical and cultural value as it was the first Nobel Prize won by an Indian; but from a patriotic view, Tagore’s Nobel Medal is simply priceless, mentioned PTI.

Along with the medal, Tagore’s gold pocket watch, his wife Mrinalini Devi’s gold bangle and antique Baluchari saree, his father Debendranath Tagore’s gold ring, several silver articles, rare paintings besides other awards, and certificates conferred on him were also stolen. In 2005, the Nobel foundation handed over two replicas of the Nobel Prize to Vishwa Bharati University.

Even though CID and later CBI took over this case time and again, but they never had much luck and were compelled to close it down. After a temporary pause, this case was reopened again because of political influence and national interest.

The SIT which arrested Bauri, was formed thereafter with Mamata Banerjee’s enthusiasm and support. It consists of Kolkata Police Commissioner Rajiv Kumar, ADG of Criminal Investigation Department (CID) Rajesh Kumar and IG of CID (II) Javed Shamim.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram with inputs from PTI. Twitter: @dubumerang

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Child Rights Summit: Nations Should Spend More on Education Over Weapons

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child rights summit
Displaced Syrian children look out from their tents at Kelbit refugee camp, near the Syrian-Turkish border, in Idlib province, Syria, Jan. 17, 2018. VOA

Countries should spend more on schooling and less on weapons to ensure that children affected by war get an education, a child rights summit heard Monday.

The gathering in Jordan was told that a common thread of war was its devastating impact in keeping children out of school.

Indian Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi, who founded the summit, said ensuring all children around the world received a primary and secondary education would cost another $40 billion annually — about a week’s worth of global military expenditure.

ALSO READ: Politics and Education: A Relationship that contributes a lot in shaping our Future

child rights summit
Nobel Peace Prize laureates Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai listen to speeches during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo, Dec. 10, 2014. VOA

“We have to choose whether we have to produce guns and bullets, or we have to produce books and pencils to our children,” he told the second Laureates and Leaders for Children Summit that gathers world leaders and Nobel laureates.

Global military expenditure reached almost $1.7 trillion in 2016, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF said last year 27 million children were out of school in conflict zones.

ALSO READ: Exclusive: How is One Woman Army changing the notions of Education in society?

“We want safe schools, we want safe homes, we want safe countries, we want a safe world,” said Satyarthi, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai for his work with children.

Jordan’s Prince Ali bin al-Hussein told the summit, which focused on child refugees and migrants affected by war and natural disasters, that education was “key,” especially for “children on the move.”

“Education can be expensive, but never remotely as close to what is being spent on weapons. … They [children] are today’s hope for a better future,” he told the two-day summit.

Kerry Kennedy, president of Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights, a nonprofit group, described the number of Syrian refugees not in school in the Middle East as “shocking” as the war enters its eighth year.

Kennedy cited a report being released Tuesday by the KidsRights Foundation, an international children’s rights group, which found 40 percent of school-aged Syrian children living in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, and Iraq cannot access education. VOA