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Meat ban may cast shadow over Eid-ul-Azha festivities

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credit: www.123g.us

New Delhi: With hundreds of families across the country preparing Eid-ul-Azha in the last week of September, the ban on sale of meat, including beef, has come as a huge setback for the traders who were expecting a good business during the festive season.

credit: www.thanhniennews.com
credit: www.thanhniennews.com

Akbar Qureshi, a meat trader in the Mankhurd area of Mumbai, is a worried man since the ban on beef came into force in Maharashtra in March this year under the Maharashtra Animal Preservation (Amendment) Act, 1995. Since then, he has been able to sell very little buffalo meat and is in danger of running out of customers.

“People don’t eat buffalo meat that much. I would earlier sell some 100 kilograms of beef daily, but now I hardly sell 40 kilograms of buffalo meat,” he said.

Akbar is just one among hundreds of traders, dealers and suppliers whose business has been severely affected by the beef ban in the state.

While Maharashtra and Haryana had banned beef earlier, many other states including Gujarat and Chhattisgarh and cities like Mumbai and its suburbs have recently introduced temporary bans on sale and possession of meat for varying number of days in respect of ‘Paryushana’, a Jain fasting season.

The ban on beef comes even as India has emerged as the world’s top exporter of beef since last year. As per data released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in April this year, India has doubled its beef export from 1.26 million tonnes in 2011-12 to 2.40 million tonnes in 2014-15.

Beef ban means no exports either. Anwar Khan owns Al-Saba exports, a meat exporting company in Mumbai. He is facing huge losses.

“My monthly turnover was around Rs. 2.5 crore. But now I have lost everything and had to fire over 100 employees,” said Khan. “We are running short of buffaloes here, due to which it is impossible to do business,” he added.

Jammu and Kashmir became the latest addition to this list when the state High Court directed the authorities on September 10 to strictly enforce a 150-year-old erstwhile Dogra-rule-era provision of ban on sale and distribution of beef in the state.

Shabir Ahmad, along with his family, has domesticated a bullock to sacrifice this Eid. He is worried about being able to do that due to the ban.

“I would graze the bullock for hours after my day work and would give fodder to keep him in good health,” Shabir said.

Beef is particularly useful since it is cheap and hence bull or bullocks are preferred by many rural families over sheep or goat for the animal sacrifice during the Eid-ul-Azha. Moreover, in religious convention, while a goat or sheep qualifies a single person for the sacrificial obligations, a bovine animal qualifies seven people.

“I can’t afford a separate sheep or goat individually for every family member,” Ahmad added.

Given the religious implications of the ban, the decision has invited harsh criticism from not only the ordinary Kashmiris but also religious bodies. Jamaat-e-Islami, one of the largest such bodies in the Valley, has termed the decision as totally ‘unacceptable’.

G.M. Bhat, Ameer of the Jamaat, said, “It is absolutely not possible to convince the Muslim community to go against their own religion; so we oppose it.”

To protest against the ban, the Valley also observed a two-day strike on the call given by the Hurriyat led by Syed Ali Shah Geelani. He termed the court’s decision as interference in religious affairs.

Geelani said, “If India boasts of being a secular country, then everyone has a right to practice one’s religion. However, this controversial decision has taken away the freedom of the Muslims only.”

Meanwhile, meat suppliers in the region are now worried about losing their business as the festival season approaches.

Manzoor Ahmad, Anantnag-based supplier, had sold thousands of animals on Eid last year. This year he is looking at a gloomy business scenario.

“Last year, I supplied many animals before the Eid-ul-Azha. If this ban remains, dealers and suppliers will have to face huge business losses,” said Ahmad.

Cow is a revered animal for many in the Hindu community, and therefore its slaughter is considered unacceptable by them. Prohibition of cow slaughter is mentioned as one of the Directive Principles of State Policy under Article 48 of the Indian Constitution. The issue, though, has remained largely dormant till recently.

However, recent moves by the BJP-ruled states like Maharashtra and Haryana to cover all bovine animals in the anti-slaughter law and steps by several others to impose temporary meat bans are seen as powerful indicators of the growing influence of the right-wing Hindu organisations since the Narendra Modi government assumed power last year.

(Aijaz Nazir, IANS)

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Shiv Sena Worker To Force Shut Over 500 Meat Seller Shops On Navratri

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Shiv Sena Meat Ban
Source: Wikimedia Common

Gurgaon, September 22, 2017: Shiv Sena workers allegedly close down over 500 chicken and meat shops on September 21 on account of Navratri festival.

Reportedly, Ritu Raj, general secretary and spokesperson of Shiv Sena Gurgaon said a notice has been served to meat seller in the area and a strict action will be taken if one denies following the instruction. He also stated that no restrictions have been imposed on the big franchise like KFC, McDonald’s which are not operating in open areas.

There has been a raid of force shutdown of meat sellers shop in the areas like Surat Nagar, Palam Vihar, Ashok Vihar, Pataudi Chowk, Jacobpura, Sadar Bazar, Sector 5 and 9,  Khandsa Anaj Mandi, bus stand, DLF area, Sohna and Sector 14 market.

ALSO READ: Meat ban: Muslims say aye, Hindus say nay.

Raj also stated that a memorandum has been served to the Deputy Commissioner of Gurgaon Vinay Pratap Singh commanding to shut down the raw meat shops for the next 9 days but the district administration did not put a proper response to that.

The matter is been looked upon and any hindrance to the law will not be entertained. In case if Shiv Sena workers forcefully Shut down the meat shops, a severe action will be drawn against them if any grievance is registered in this regards.

– prepared by Abhishek Biswas Twitter: @Writing_desire

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Myanmar violence: In Rakhine state of Myanmar houses have burned and around 400 people have died

The United Nations says at least 38,000 people have fled from Myanmar into Bangladesh, most of them are Rohingya

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Rohingya
A group of Rohingya refugees walk on the muddy road after traveling over the Bangladesh-Myanmar border. VOA
  • Thousands of people have fled their villages and sought shelter in temples, schools, and mosques in other Rakhine town
  • Volunteers were struggling to find food for the displaced
  • Myanmar considers the Rohingya to be migrants from Bangladesh and not one of the country’s many ethnic minority groups

Rakhine, Myanmar, September 3, 2017:  About 400 people have died in violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state over the past week, military officials say, almost all of them Muslim insurgents.

A military Facebook page reported the numbers, saying 370 were insurgents, and 29 killed were either police or civilians.

Members of the minority Rohingya Muslim community, however, have reported attacks on their villages that left scores dead and forced thousands to flee.

Human Rights Watch said Saturday that satellite imagery recorded Thursday in the Rohingya Muslim village of Chein Khar Li in Rathedaung township shows the destruction of 700 buildings. The rights group says 99 percent of the village was destroyed and the damage signatures are consistent with fire, including the presence of large burn scars and destroyed tree cover.

“Yet this is only one of 17 sites that we’ve located where burnings have taken place,” said Phil Robertson, HRW’s deputy Asia director.

The United Nations says at least 38,000 people have fled from Myanmar into Bangladesh, most of them Rohingya. Community leaders in Bangladesh have told VOA that some Hindus, also a minority in Myanmar, have crossed the border.

Robertson said the U.N.’s Fact Finding Mission should get the “full cooperation” of Myanmar’s government “to fulfill their mandate to assess human rights abuses in Rakhine State and explore ways to end attacks and ensure accountability.”

HRW said Rohingya refugees who have recently fled from Myanmar into Bangladesh told the agency that Myanmar soldiers and police had burned down their homes and carried out armed attacks on villagers. The agency said many of the Rohingya refugees had “recent bullet and shrapnel wounds.”

Sources in Bangladesh have told VOA’s Bangla service that as many as 60,000 have crossed the border in recent days.

Struggling to feed displaced

In addition, thousands of people have fled their villages and sought shelter in temples, schools, and mosques in other Rakhine towns.

The deputy chairman of the Emergency Relief Committee, Khin Win, told VOA’s Burmese service by phone that 800 people are sheltering at two Buddhist monasteries in the town of Maungdaw.

“Security in Maungdaw is not even safe and some fled to Min Byar, Sittwe and Yathetaung. No one can guarantee their safety. People fleeing homes increasing and there are a few left in villages. There is only one police outpost in a village and police do not have the capability to protect villagers,” he said.

Volunteers were struggling to find food for the displaced, he said.

“We need drinking water, meat, fish, and medicines,” he said. The group has gotten rice and donations from other communities but little from the government.

“Government aid agency provided a few bags of beans and instant noodles. Three boxes of instant noodles for 500 people is not effective. Just a superficial help,” he said.

Also Read: Myanmar Woman May Khine Oo Shares Her Story of Human Trafficking to Prevent other Women from falling into the same trap

Hiding in forest

Hla Tun, a Rohingya from the village of Alae-Than-Kyaw, told the Burmese service that Muslims cannot rely on security forces for protection or help.

“Our villages are located near the rugged coastal area from south of Maungdaw to Alae-Than-Kyaw village. Almost every village has been burned down and people have nowhere to stay. People are hiding in the forest. In order to avoid authorities they can move only during night time to flee to Bangladesh,” Hla Tun said.

The violence began a week ago when a group called the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army launched a series of attacks on police posts in Rakhine, which is home to most of the Rohingya minority group. The police responded with attacks on villages, to hunt down the insurgents.

Myanmar considers the Rohingya to be migrants from Bangladesh and not one of the country’s many ethnic minority groups. Rohingya are denied citizenship, even if they can show their families have been in the country for generations.

Sectarian violence between Buddhists and Muslims has flared periodically for more than a decade. Until last month’s attacks, the worst violence was last October, when insurgents attacked several police posts, sparking a military crackdown that sent thousands fleeing to Bangladesh.

The Myanmar government has denied allegations of abuse against the Rohingya and has limited access to Rakhine to journalists and other outsiders; but, the country’s ambassador to the United Nations says the government plans to implement the recommendations of a U.N. commission to improve conditions and end the violence. (VOA)

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“Sacrifice Bad Habits, Not Animals This Eid”: RSS Muslim Wing

Eid-ul-Azha (Bakrid) will be celebrated on September 2

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Bakri Eid
Islamic Bakri Eid animal sacrifice in India. Wikimedia
  • Animal sacrifice during Bakrid is a bad practice like Triple Talaq, says MRM
  • On September 11, a march from Lucknow to Ayodhya was planned in support for the construction of a Ram temple in Ayodhya
  • Eid-ul-Azha (Bakrid) will be celebrated on September 2

Lucknow, Aug 31, 2017: The Muslim Rashtriya Manch (MRM), an RSS affiliate, has appealed to Muslims to sacrifice bad habits and not goats this Eid-ul-Azha (Bakrid).

According to PTI report, “Animal sacrifice during Bakrid is a bad practice like Triple Talaq. People should boycott those advocating sacrifice on the day. Giving ‘Qurbani‘ during Bakrid is ‘haram’ (not approved) in Islam”, said MRM Convenor (Awadh Prant-UP) Syed Hasan Kausar.

“If anyone wanted to give sacrifice, he should shun his bad habits and cut a (symbolic) goat cake on Bakrid,” he said.

Kausar said that there were many superstitions amongst Muslims surrounding animal sacrifice and remarked that those with better education would “understand Islam.”

Meanwhile, MRM co-convenor K A Khurshid Agha supported a Ram temple in Ayodhya.

“As per Quran, prayers can not be offered at a disputed place, so how can the Babri mosque be constructed at the disputed site in Ayodhya,” he said.

Previously, Manch had announced that it would start a nationwide campaign to urge Muslims against consecrating cows on Eid-Ul-Azha primarily in Uttar Pradesh, West Bihar, and Bengal.

A resolution was passed against cow slaughter at an event presided by Indresh Kumar, senior RSS leader, in New Delhi where MRM leaders met Islamic scholars associated with the organization.

ALSO READ: Tarkulha Devi Temple in UP is the host of Animal Sacrifice Ritual connected with a Martyr

Agha said that “Muslims were confused about how to follow the path of Allah and they should come up against animal sacrifice.”

On September 11, a march from Lucknow to Ayodhya was planned in support for the construction of a Ram temple in Ayodhya by the organization. The march will reach Ayodhya on September 17, during which the MRM will organize presentations at every third kilometer to convince people about the construction of the temple.


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