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Bobby Jindal clashes with Republican rival over health care

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Washington: All the 17 Republican presidential candidates, including Louisiana’s Indian-American governor Bobby Jindal, want to repeal President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law, but there is little said about what would come in its place.

An intra-party feud broke out Tuesday over the Affordable Care Act with Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker unveiling a plan to replace “Obamacare” and Jindal immediately attacking it on the campaign trail.

Bobby_Jindal_CPAC_2013_BWalker’s plan “makes the mistake President Obama did of creating a new entitlement programme at a time when we can’t afford the entitlement programmes we’ve got today,” Jindal told a lunch crowd in Le Mars in Iowa, The Advocate newspaper reported.

“I don’t think that Republicans should be offering Obamacare-lite plans,” Jindal told reporters in Le Mars. “It continues this idea of government dependence.”

“For several months now, I’ve been the only candidate to offer a detailed plan,” said Jindal continuing the tirade at a forum in Council Bluffs, Iowa, on Tuesday night. “It’s one thing to give a speech, but it’s another to give details.”

Walker’s plan calls for the creation of a refundable tax credit for individuals who do not have employer-based coverage.

That’s what Jindal has pointed to as an “entitlement” in the plan, though he previously has expressed support for some refundable tax credits for health care, the Advocate noted.

Jindal later challenged Walker to a debate over health care in Iowa, via Twitter and an email blast from his campaign.

“Walker’s plan is getting rave reviews from the conservative movement for being a thoughtful, substantive and viable plan to repeal and replace Obamacare and make health care affordable and accessible for Americans,” Walker’s campaign said in an email to The Advocate

“The refundable health care tax credits the governor includes have been supported by many conservatives because they put health care decision-making in the hands of the American people where it belongs.”

Since 2010, Republicans have pledged to repeal and replace Obamacare. The Republican controlled House “has voted 56 times to repeal or undermine the law, but zero times on a plan to replace it,” the Washington Post pointed out on Tuesday.

All the 17 Republicans candidates too have promised to repeal the law, “but most of them have said relatively little about what they’d put in its place,” the influential newspaper noted.

Front-runner Donald Trump, for instance, has said that his replacement would be “something terrific” and that it would involve making an unspecified deal with hospitals to treat the poor and uninsured.

“We are going to have to work out some kind of a very, very smart deal with hospitals,” he told CNN when asked how.

(IANS)

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56 Percent Disapprove of Republican health care plan to replace the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare: Poll

One out of every seven Americans -- 14 per cent -- believes they will lose their health insurance under the Republicans' replacement plan

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Presidential encyclopedias
US President Donald Trump, VOA

Washington, March 24, 2017: A majority of American voters, 56 percent, disapprove of the Republican health care plan to replace the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare, according to a poll.

Only 17 percent of voters approve of the plan and 26 percent remain undecided, the Quinnipiac University poll revealed on Thursday.

The question — “There is a Republican health care plan to replace Obamacare, known as the American Health Care Act. Do you approve or disapprove of this Republican health care plan?” — did not go into specifics of the plan.

“Replacing Obamacare will come with a price for elected representatives who vote to scrap it, say many Americans, who clearly feel their health is in peril under the Republican alternative,” CNN quoted Tim Malloy, assistant director of the poll, as saying.

Most voters, 61 percent, also disapprove of the way President Donald Trump is handling health care.

The President and Republican leaders are scrambling for a deal on landmark legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans cannot lose more than 21 members of their party and still pass the bill, since no Democrats are expected to support it.

One out of every seven Americans — 14 per cent — believes they will lose their health insurance under the Republicans’ replacement plan.

The plan itself does not enjoy majority support among Republicans, with only 41 per cent backing the bill, reports CNN.

Most men, 56 per cent, disapprove of the plan as do most women, also 56 per cent.

While more than half of white voters disapprove of the plan, even more non-white voters — 64 per cent — disapprove.

Overall, 58 per cent of independent voters disapprove of the replacement plan.

Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,056 voters nationwide from March 16 to 21.

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Bobby Jindal backs down from US presidential race

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Washington: In a move that left American poll pundits surprised, Louisiana’s Indian-American Republican Governor Bobby has backed out from the 2016 US presidential race saying “this is not my time“.

Announcing his decision in Fox News on Tuesday evening, Louisiana-born son of Indian immigrant parents from Punjab, Jindal, said, “they raised me to believe Americans can do anything, and they were right, we can.

“I don’t think in a million years they would have ever imagined that I’d be governor or one day I’d be running for president of the United States,” he said.

“But I’ve come to the realization this is not my time. So I am suspending my campaign for president,” Jindal said. “Going forward, I believe we have to be the party of growth and we can never stop being the party that believes in opportunity.”

“We cannot settle for the left’s view of envy and division. We have to be the party that says everyone in this country – no matter the circumstances of their birth or who their parents are – can succeed in America.”

Asked why his candidacy didn’t take off, Jindal said, “we spent a lot of time developing detailed policy papers, and given this crazy, unpredictable election season, clearly there just wasn’t a lot of interest in those policy papers.”

He faced a variety of obstacles. Jindal was long hamstrung by weak national poll numbers, anemic fundraising as well as low approval ratings in his home state –where only a third of voters approved of his leadership. His poor performance in national polls meant that he was kept off the main stage in presidential debates and instead relegated to the undercard debate.

He is the third Republican to suspend his campaign after former Texas Governor Rick Perry and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker dropped out earlier this year.

Once seen as a rising star in the Republican Party, Jindal’s campaign failed to gain much momentum as he kept polling less than one percent in various national surveys.

A Brown University graduate and Rhodes Scholar, he rose to prominence at the start of President Barack Obama’s first term when he was asked to deliver the Republican Party’s rebuttal to the State of the Union address in 2009. But his performance was widely panned.

In announcing his departure from the race, Jindal also said he would go back
to work at his think tank, America Next.

Jindal told Fox he is not endorsing another candidate right now, but will support the eventual Republican presidential nominee.

“At the end of the day I trust the American people to select our nominee for the next president,” he said adding, “I want someone who’s got the smarts to make big changes.”

Reportedly,  Jindal believes that government experience is needed in a presidential candidate, so he is more likely to back senators Ted Cruz or Marco Rubio than Trump or Carson, the two leading candidates in the race.

(With inputs from agencies)

(Picture Courtesy: www.nola.com)

 

 

 

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Decrying socialism Bobby Jindal wants poor also to pay taxes

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Washington: Deriding Democrats as socialists and fellow Republicans in Washington as weak and too quick to surrender, Indian-American presidential hopeful Bobby Jindal has proposed making everyone – including the poor – pay federal income taxes.

This was the best way to rein in government spending, he said participating in Wednesday night’s undercard CNBC Republican Presidential Debate at Colorado University’s Coors Events Center, in Boulder, Colorado.

“I want every American to worry and care about how those folks in DC are spending our money,” Jindal said. “Socialism is bad. Not only for taxpayers, but for the people they’re trying to help. There’s dignity in work. There’s dignity in self-sufficiency.”

“We are going the way of Europe,” he said at one point. “The left is trying to change the American dream into the European nightmare.”

Jindal joined three other low polling candidates — South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum and former New York Governor George Pataki — in the hour-long debate ahead of the main debate among top ten Republican candidates.

Taking up the role of the angry conservative, Jindal lobbed insults both at Democrats and at fellow Republicans in Washington, whom he accused of surrendering to Democrats. Jindal also criticized the budget agreement that the House approved Wednesday as a “very bad deal” and blamed the Republicans of Congress for refusing to fight.

“Here’s the problem: the Republicans never want to fight,” Jindal said, picking up on a pet campaign theme.

He praised Democrats for fighting effectively for “socialism.” “Why won’t the Republicans fight half as hard for freedom and opportunity? This is a very bad budget.”

The four undercard Republicans, who have all struggled to gain any momentum in the polls, also took aim at the Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton, but they all – including Jindal who has made a habit of attacking Donald Trump – refrained from criticising the party frontrunner .

Jindal ended the debate with an appeal for Americans to think of their country in Christian terms: with faith that a frightening situation could be saved.

“The idea of America is slipping away. As Christians, we believe that the tomb is empty. As Americans we believe that our best days are ahead of us,” Jindal said.

It was a reference to the tomb of Jesus Christ, which Christians believe was found empty because Christ had been resurrected after death.

“We can save the idea of America,” Jindal said. “Before it’s too late.”

(Arun Kumar,IANS)