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Brazilian footballer Robinho faces extended spell on sidelines after scans revealed broken bone in his back

Brazilian footballer Robinho faces an extended spell on the sidelines a broken bone in his back.

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A football fan, Pixabay
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Brazil, Jan27, 2017: Brazilian footballer Robinho faces an extended spell on the sidelines after scans revealed a broken bone in his back.

The 33-year-old Atletico Mineiro player suffered the injury during Brazil’s 1-0 friendly victory over Colombia on Thursday, a match that raised money for victims of the Chapecoense air disaster, reports Xinhua news agency.

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“Robinho suffered trauma in his back – a small fracture in the third vertebra,” Brazil team doctor Rodrigo Lasmar said on Thursday.

“It’s similar to the one that Neymar had at the (2014) World Cup, but this is a little different because it’s an incomplete fracture without any deviation,” Lasmar added.

Robinho is expected to miss most or all of Atletico Mineiro’s Campeonato Mineiro campaign, which begins on Saturday. (IANS)

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Study: Drinking and Smoking can cause Problems to the Dental Fillings

Failure of Dental fillings in smokers and alcohol drinkers.

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Smoking causes failure of Dental fillings
Smoking causes failure of Dental fillings. Pixabay
  • Indulging in smoking or drinking alcohol may not only damage your teeth but also lead to increased incidences of failure in dental fillings, warned researchers.

The findings, led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, showed that within two years of the dental procedure, Dental fillings failed more often in patients who drank alcohol, while the overall filling failure rate was higher in men who smoked.

Furthermore, people with a difference in the gene for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP2) — an enzyme found in teeth — were at increased risk of Dental filling failure.

This could be because MMP2 might be able to degrade the bond between the filling and the tooth surface, potentially leading to failure, the researchers said.

The results, published in the journal Frontiers in Medicine, suggest that genetic analysis might help dentists to personalize treatments for their patients, which could lead to improved outcomes.

“A better understanding of individual susceptibility to dental disease and variation in treatment outcomes will allow the dental field to move forward,” said Alexandre Vieira, a researcher from the varsity.

“In the future, genetic information may be used to personalize dental treatments and enhance treatment outcomes,” Vieira added.

For the study, the team from America and Brazil analyzed dental records of 807 patients.
Fillings can fail for a variety of reasons, including re-emergence of the initial tooth decay or the filling becoming detached.

The researchers also examined if newer composite resin Dental fillings are as durable as traditional amalgam fillings, which have been in use for more than 150 years but which contain mercury, a toxic metal.

The researchers found that overall, there were no major differences between patients receiving amalgam or composite Dental fillings in terms of filling failure rates. (IANS)

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