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British website: cremation of Netaji in Taikhou

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London: A Taiwanese official who is said to be present at the cremation of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose claimed that the leader was cremated in Taipei, a British website quoted. The plane bound for Tokyo was to take the body for performing his last rites there. However, the coffin was too long to be put in the plane.

The website, www.bosefiles.info has been coming out with serialised “revelations” backing the theory that the Indian revolutionary leader died in a plane crash on August 18, 1945, in Taiwan.

In its latest post on Thursday, the site created by London-based journalist and Netaji’s grandnephew Ashish Roy referred to the evidence provided by Tan Ti-Ti, who was in charge of issuing cremation permits in Taipei, together with that of other local officials, to support its claim.

Tan Ti-Ti, in his testimony contained in the British Foreign Office’s file number FC1852/6 of 1956, said that he personally attended to Bose’s body at the concerned crematorium.

It also transpires from the file that Japanese army officers probably did not issue a death certificate in Bose’s name to maintain secrecy about his demise.

Ko Keng Yuan, who was the Director of the Health Centre in Taipei, stated the matter of Bose’s death and whether the cremation permit was issued under an assumed name “were important secrets of the Japanese military”.

Eleven years after the alleged air crash, British Consul General in Taiwan Albert Franklin wrote to the Taiwanese government requesting an investigation into the death of Bose.

In response, C K Yen, Chairman of the Taiwan Provincial Government, sent a detailed police report dated June 27, 1956. This included an interview with Tan Ti-Ti, who said the cremation took place on August 22, 1945.

A Japanese army officer who accompanied the body told Tan Ti-Ti: “The deceased was Bose, the Indian leader who, proceeding to Tokyo on important business, was injured when his plane was involved in an accident.”

The previous day – August 21, 1945 – the same Japanese officer, according to Tan Ti-Ti, “submitted the death certificate of a certain Ichiro Okura”.

Yen clarified to Franklin that during World War 2 in the case of military personnel A- Bose was then Supreme Commander of the Indian National Army – without family members in Taiwan, “permission for cremation was granted on the strength of a certificate from a military hospital”.

This appears to have occurred in the case of Bose, the website claimed.

The police findings based on a report prepared by Taiwan’s Department of Health said: “There is a register of cremations at the Municipal Health Centre and the officers of the Health Centre are of the opinion that the entry was made in the name of Ichiro Okura.”

Tan Ti-Ti confirmed that on the day of the cremation, the same Japanese army officer “came to the crematorium in a car in the company of an Indian”, said to be Bose’s aide-de-camp Colonel Habibur Rehman, who survived the crash.

He went on to say “the Indian, it was said he was Bose’s follower, some said he was an aide-de-camp; he was dressed in the white garment of Japanese soldiers under medical care, wore slippers, parts of his face were bandaged; he was tall and swarthy, wept bitterly and seemed extremely sorrowful”.

Tan Ti-Ti asserted he and another person called Lin Sui Mu opened the coffin. He added the body had been “put into a coffin for conveyance to Tokyo but the coffin was too big for aeroplanes available at the time. It was, therefore, cremated in Taipei.

The next day (August 23, 1945), the Indian (Col Rehman) and the same Japanese army officer came to collect the ashes, Tan Ti-Ti further maintained.

Tan Ti-Ti’s testimony matches that of Colonel Habibur Rehman.

“I requested the (Japanese) Army authorities to arrange for the early transportation of the body either to Singapore or Tokyo, preferably to Singapore,” Rehman testified on August 24, 1945.

He went on: “On 21 August 1945, a senior Japanese Staff Officer informed me in the hospital that the length of the box (coffin) did not allow the box being put into the plane. He suggested that the body be cremated in Taihoku.

“Seeing no other alternative, I agreed to the suggestion and the body was cremated on 22-8-1945 at Taihoku under the arrangement of the Army authorities. The ashes were collected on 23rd August 1945.” (IANS)

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The Story Behind the Rise of Emojis and their Family

Even in barriers to communication such as language, a simple Emoji is powerful enough to dictate the entire message

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Emojis
Emojis originally became part of daily use in Japan. Wikimedia Commons
  • The use of Emoji can be traced back to the language of the term; Japanese
  • In the terminology, ‘e’ means picture while ‘moji’ means written character
  • The word Emoji won the award for ‘Oxford Word of the Year 2015’

July 30, 2017: Emojis are added entertainment to our conversations. Living subtly in our smartphones, the Emojis have come a long way from once where they started.

The first use of Emoji was in Japan. Emoji is a Japanese term where ‘e’ means picture and ‘moji’ means written character when translated into English. The popular characters emerged in smartphones before coming to social platforms.

Also Read: Obsession with the term ‘food Porn’: How it has become an Industry on Social Media!

In the 1990s, there was only a total of 172. People loved and encouraged them right away. However, the technology at the time did not support them. Communication issues persisted even as Emojis became widely popular. Among the different operating software, a consistent emoji was never established.

Emojis were given hope when they were adopted by The Unicode Consortium. The Unicode Consortium is a non-profit company from the Silicon Valley. But, Unicode needs to be convinced that a particular emoji is needed. A certain guarantee of their popularity has to be estimated. Moreover, they should be unique and not specific to few number of people.

As of May 2016, 1624 official Emojis exist on multiple platforms. From Japanese nationalism, Emojis have become global citizens used in different countries. Emojis represent the diversity that exists in the global village.

Various stereotypes have been exhibited through these tiny little friends. There have even been social movements criticizing the absence of equality, after which additional emojis were created. Now all genders and communities are represented in all aspects of life. Professions, sports and other activities are gender expressed and multicultural.

Unicode standards provide the Emojis with a ‘glyph’, or a unique code. The expression is consistent throughout platforms, however, the final presentation of the emoji is entirely in the hands of the platform. For Example, the laughing emoji is different for Apple, Samsung,  Microsoft, Android, Google and more. The basic expression of laughing is expressed in different ways.

Today, Emojis stand universal. Even in barriers to communication such as language, a simple Emoji is powerful enough to dictate the entire message. Emoji won the award for ‘Oxford Word of the Year 2015’ and it was the first time that a picture character won the award.

– Prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 

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Has The Chinese Government Done Enough to Assist Victims of ‘Comfort Women’ System?

The Chinese government has not fully addressed the issue due to diplomatic condition with the Japanese government

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Comfort women
Women in comfort stations in Shanghai. Wikimedia
  • The ‘comfort women’ system was started by the Japanese before and during World War II
  • Little girls and women were forced into military brothels known as “comfort station”
  • The Chinese government has not done enough in respect to this issue as compared to its South Korean counterpart

New Delhi, July 22, 2017: There exists an empty building on Ganging road with window frames painted red and it is one of the pre-world war II buildings in Shanghai. Sources reveal, it was once a military brothel and accommodates dark memories. It is amongst the comfort stations where a wide sexual slavery system was started by the Japanese for their armed forces during and before the time of world war II.

There were once more than 150 comfort stations in Shanghai alone, but these buildings are disappearing due to rapid development, demolishing historical remains.

Only a handful of these comfort women are still alive and they do not receive any assistance from the government. These women are 90-year-olds, covered with scars and some of them do not even have any family or children. An estimated 200,000 women, many of them mere girls from Asian countries are believed to have been forcefully employed in these Japanese brothels during the time of World War II.

Also read: Chinese political academy holds its first seminar for Catholic clergy in China

The building on Ganging road was scheduled to be renovated but was rescued by the efforts of a historian called Su Whiling who highlighted the building’s history and the Chinese media supported him. He wanted to initiate a movement in order to put the suffering of those comfort women on spotlight but unfortunately, he was prohibited from publishing his research by the authorities when he first studied the matter in the 1990s.

The government of China has not fully addressed this human rights issue in order to preserve good relations with the Japanese. As compared to South Korea, China has certainly not done enough regarding this issue. Su alone raises funds for the 17 known survivors who were dishonored and boycotted and did not receive any kind of aid from the government.

It was in the 1990s that the Japanese government finally accepted that the comfort women system actually existed and thereafter it has apologized and offered these women compensation. Under the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Chinese President Xi Jinping, the issue has received some attention according to the experts.

A “comfort station” located in Nanjing, 300 kilometers west of Shanghai was transformed into a museum and was inaugurated in December 2015. Su was even allowed to upgrade display of his records and findings into a museum which opened on his university campus in October. Just outside that building, a statue of two comfort women was unveiled. The statue represents Chinese and Korean comfort women. The documents on comfort women have been made available and there can be seen an international effort to include these findings in the UNESCO International Memory of The World Register.

Su, in his statement, said that the first ever comfort station in the world has not been fully protected and in order to avoid this regrettable situation, we need to work hard.

– prepared by Harsimran Kaur of NewsGram. Twitter @Hkaur1025

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Subhas Chandra Bose Didn’t Die in an Air Crash, Suggests French Report

The French government has always been silent on the issue, adding more significance to the findings

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Subhas Chandra Bose and the mystery around his death
Subhas Chandra Bose with Mahatma Gandhi at the Indian National Congress meeting. Wikimedia
  • Paris based historian, J B P More, through a brief French secret service report came up with a finding that Bose didn’t die in an air crash and was alive in 1947
  • The French government has always been silent on the issue
  • The Indian government, supposedly ended the mystery some time ago, by replying to an RTI query

New Delhi, July 17, 2017: Seventy-two years since the report of the death of Subhas Chandra Bose, but the debate regarding the real timing and cause of his demise continues. Whether the plane crash story holds any ground or not, is still a mystery that is yet to be solved.

Three commissions were appointed by the government of India to resolve the deeply rooted mystery. Among them, The Shah Nawaz Committee (1956) and Khosla Commission (1970) concluded that Bose died in an air crash on August 18, 1945, at Taihoku airport in Japanese-occupied Taipei, whereas, the Mukherjee Commission came to the conclusion that he did not die in an air crash. Although the Government rejected the claims of the Mukherjee Commission, this did not refrain the scholars around the world to get deep into the case to find the truth.

Recently, Paris-based historian, J B P More stumbled upon a brief French secret service report dated December 11, 1947, at the National Archives of France. He came up with a finding that Bose didn’t die in an air crash and was still alive in 1947.

Also read: Personal life of Subhas Chandra Bose generates divisive views

“It is not stated in the document that Subhas Chandra Bose died in the air crash in Taiwan. Instead, it is reported that Bose’s present whereabouts were unknown as late as December 1947, which again implies that the French did not buy the theory that Bose died in the air crash on August 18, 1945,” said More, who teaches at the Institut des Hautes Etudes Economiques et Commerciales, Paris.

“But he escaped from Indochina alive and his whereabouts were unknown as late as December 11, 1947, as reported in the secret document. This implies that he was alive somewhere but not dead in 1947,” More added, quoting the report written for the “Haut Commisariat de France for Indochina” SDECE Indochinese Base BCRI No. 41283 csah Ex No. 616, under the title: “Archival Information on Subhas Chandra Bose.”

After Bose took off from Saigon on his way to Tokyo, the British and the Japanese too declared that Bose died in an air crash, but the French government always remained silent on the issue, though Vietnam/Indochina was a French colony during the 1940s.

Also read: 100 files related to Netaji declassified by PM Modi on his birth anniversary

Scholars have expressed their concern regarding the need for the findings in the report to be taken seriously. “Even though the Mukherjee Commission concluded that Bose didn’t die in an air crash, the government didn’t recognize it. The Centre’s idea to ‘declassify’ secret files on Bose may not help, But findings like this have significance,” said Kingshuk Nag, a noted journalist and author of the book “Netaji: Living Dangerously.”

Only some time ago, The Ministry of Home Affairs, India, supposedly ended the mystery by replying to a Right To Information query filed by Sayak Sen. MHA reportedly said: “After considering the reports of Shahnawaz Committee, Justice GD Khosla Commission and Justice Mukherjee Commission of Enquiry, the Government has come to the conclusion that Netaji has died in plane crash in 1945.”

Now, Paris-based historian J B P More, with his findings, seems to have given a new shape to this enigma.

– prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_samiksha