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Capturing the moment or trapping the victim?

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Daily, your Facebook wall gets at least one video which shows how a person is abused in one way or the other. The world should know the evil which we need to eradicate, and so the video is viral. But does it help?

By Kanika Rangray

New Delhi: There is a video going viral on Facebook which shows a mall toy car operator forcibly kissing a child. In this heart-wrenching video you see the innocent little boy trying with his meagre strength to push away the man as he is crying for help.

What was happening?

Instead of helping the innocent little kid, instead of pulling off the toy car operator from the boy, the person assumed it would be better to make a video of the entire incident and put it on social media. May be it was thought to be the ‘right content’ to make the video viral.

A simple question, please answer— how did making the video help out the little kid? Will it be able to erase the trauma which might have embedded itself in the innocent’s mind? Wouldn’t the better option be to go ahead and stop the trauma than to film it?

Photo credit: brafton.com This picture is for representational purpose only
Photo credit: brafton.com
This picture is for representational purpose only

This is not the first time that such incident has occurred. People prefer to watch from the sidelines, filming the troubles faced by a person, and then brandishing the video around to their friends or on social media, instead of lending a helping hand. All this is done, supposedly, for ‘creating awareness’ about the issue.

Such an example can be seen almost daily in the Delhi metro. A mother holding her son in her arms tries to de-board the train. But the crowd is least interested in letting her deboard and more interested in getting on to the train. Hence follows a tussle, in which the little kiddo—hardly three or four years of age—gets hurt and starts crying. What happens next? NOTHING! The onlookers take out their mobiles and start filming the incident rather than helping the woman. Isn’t it cute to see a kid cry? May be it is!

Again, another example from the Metro—general compartment, man misbehaving with a girl, the other passengers ‘ladies included’ standby and watch, some make videos, nobody helps.

Whenever such examples of social evils or people’s lack of etiquette comes to the front, heaps of comments, ideas, suggestions start pouring in—advising that these social evils can only be stopped when the society changes its mentality.

Well aren’t you a part of that society whose mentality—so gallantly said—needs to be changed? Whether you lend a helping hand or take up videography depends on your ‘mentality’.  As Mahatma Gandhi had once said, “be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Think about it. You could save yourself a large amount of candles and numerous candle marches, by acting at the moment rather than protesting later.

At every such incident smartphones come out of your pocket and start filming—your phones are getting smarter, when will you?

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Copyright 2015 NewsGram

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Facebook Unveils Three-pronged Strategy to Fight Fake News

Apart from this, Facebook is also using machine learning to help its teams detect fraud and enforce its policies against spam

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Facebook Unveils Three-pronged Strategy to Fight Fake News
Facebook Unveils Three-pronged Strategy to Fight Fake News. Pixabay

To stop false news from spreading on its platform, Facebook has said it put in place a three-pronged strategy that constitutes removing accounts and content that violate its policies, reducing distribution of inauthentic content and informing people by giving them more context on the posts they see.

Another part of its strategy in some countries is partnering with third-party fact-checkers to review and rate the accuracy of articles and posts on Facebook, Tessa Lyons, a Facebook product manager on News Feed focused on false news, said in a statement on Thursday.

The social media giant is facing criticism for its role in enabling political manipulation in several countries around the world. It has also come under the scanner for allegedly fuelling ethnic conflicts owing to its failure stop the deluge of hate-filled posts against the disenfranchised Rohingya Muslim minority in Myanmar.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“False news is bad for people and bad for Facebook. We’re making significant investments to stop it from spreading and to promote high-quality journalism and news literacy,” Lyons said.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday told the European Parliament leaders that the social networking giant is trying to plug loopholes across its services, including curbing fake news and political interference on its platform in the wake of upcoming elections globally, including in India.

Lyons said Facebook’s three-pronged strategy roots out the bad actors that frequently spread fake stories.

Also Read: Facebook Planning to Increase Their Capability Through Smartphones

“It dramatically decreases the reach of those stories. And it helps people stay informed without stifling public discourse,” Lyons added.

Although false news does not violate Facebook’s Community Standards, it often violates the social network’s polices in other categories, such as spam, hate speech or fake accounts, which it removes remove.

“For example, if we find a Facebook Page pretending to be run by Americans that’s actually operating out of Macedonia, that violates our requirement that people use their real identities and not impersonate others. So we’ll take down that whole Page, immediately eliminating any posts they made that might have been false,” Lyons explained.

Lyons said Facebook's three-pronged strategy roots out the bad actors that frequently spread fake stories.
Lyons said Facebook’s three-pronged strategy roots out the bad actors that frequently spread fake stories. Pixabay

Apart from this, Facebook is also using machine learning to help its teams detect fraud and enforce its policies against spam.

“We now block millions of fake accounts every day when they try to register,” Lyons added.

A lot of the misinformation that spreads on Facebook is financially motivated, much like email spam in the 90s, the social network said.

If spammers can get enough people to click on fake stories and visit their sites, they will make money off the ads they show.

Also Read: Facebook Lets Advertisers Target Users Based on Sensitive Interests

“We’re figuring out spammers’ common tactics and reducing the distribution of those kinds of stories in News Feed. We’ve started penalizing clickbait, links shared more frequently by spammers, and links to low-quality web pages, also known as ‘ad farms’,” Lyons said.

“We also take action against entire Pages and websites that repeatedly share false news, reducing their overall News Feed distribution,” Lyons said.

Facebook said it does not want to make money off of misinformation or help those who create it profit, and so such publishers are not allowed to run ads or use its monetisation features like Instant Articles. (IANS)