Saturday December 16, 2017
Home Uncategorized Charlie Hebdo...

Charlie Hebdo criticised for Syrian toddler cartoon

0
41

Paris: French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo was criticised for publishing a cartoon depicting the death of three-year-old Syrian toddler Aylan Kurdi as the magazine’s controversial take on the refugee and migration crisis, media reported on Tuesday.

Photo credit: dailysabah.com
Photo credit: dailysabah.com

The cartoon attributed to the publication and circulating on social media features Aylan lying face down on a beach with the words “So close to his goal…” written above him, The Huffington Post reported. In the background a McDonald’s-style ‘happy meal’ Board states, “Two children’s menus for the price of one.”

Aylan drowned along with his brother and mother on September 2 when the boat they were travelling from the Greek island of Kos to the Turkish town of Bodrum capsized. The family fled after Islamic State militants advanced upon their home town of Kobane.

Another cartoon said to be from the same edition of the magazine is entitled ‘The Proof that Europe is Christian’ and features a man believed to be Jesus standing on the surface of the ocean while a child’s legs’s (presumably meant to be Aylan’s) protrude from the water.

It says: “Christians walk on water… Muslim kids sink.”

The cartoons have been met with a mixed response.

Turkish newspaper The Daily Sabah claimed the images mock the drowned toddler.

Morocco World News concurred, accusing the publication of “hiding behind the freedom of speech.”

“Charlie Hebdo is a purely racist, xenophobic and ideologically bankrupt publication that represents the moral decay of France,” Barrister Peter Herbert, who is Chair of the Society of Black Lawyers and former vice chair of the Metropolitan Police Authority, tweeted.

“The Society of Black Lawyers will consider reporting this as incitement to hate crime and persecution before the International Criminal Court.”

Complaints are being left on the magazine’s Facebook page and Twitter users have criticised the images, describing them as “tasteless” and “disgusting.”

But some  have commented that the cartoons are not mocking the dead child and are instead using the tragedy to ridicule Europe for not doing enough to prevent it.

(IANS)

Next Story

2 Years on from Terror attack in Paris, Director of Satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo defends his publication’s right to free speech

0
58
A man picks up a copy of Charlie Hebdo newspaper at a newsstand in Rennes, western France, Jan. 14, 2015. VOA

Paris, Jan 7, 2017: The publishing director of the controversial satirical weekly newspaper “Charlie Hebdo” defended his publication’s right to free speech on Saturday, two years on from the terror attack on its Paris headquarters that left 12 people dead.

Laurent Sourisseau, known as Riss, said that the “Charlie Hebdo” team should not be dictated by violence, Efe news reported.

“We’re not going to give up on our job. We’re not going to give up our passion. We’re trying to prevent our lives from being distracted by this violence,” Riss said.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The cartoonist and author, who was injured in the shooting on January 7, 2015, replaced his renowned former colleague Charb, who was among the 12 victims of the attack, as publishing director of the newspaper.

He described his round-the-clock police protection as an “unfortunate necessity”.

A special edition of “Charlie Hebdo”, issued on Wednesday, dubbed the attack committed by the Kouachi brothers as a “political crime”.

Riss said those who were killed in the shooting were people committed to defending particular forms of expression and ideas, such as satirical illustrations, adding that the attackers wanted to snuff out those voices.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Since the attack, January 7 has become a symbolic date that has been difficult to forget, Riss said.

The official tributes to the Charlie Hebdo attack and for the Hyper Cacher supermarket attack that killed three people two days later were held on Thursday.

On Saturday, the Place de la Republique in Paris was once again due to become a place of remembrance in a ceremony organised by the French Association of Victims of Terrorism.

–IANS

Next Story

Satirical Weekly Charlie Hebdo Mocks Chancellor Angela Merkel in First German Edition, almost 2 Years after Islamist Militants attacked its top Editorial Staff in Paris

The magazine is known in France for ridiculing political and religious leaders

0
58
The first issues of the German version of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo are for sale at a newsstand in Berlin, Dec. 1, 2016. VOA

The first German edition of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo hit the news stands on Thursday, with a front page lampooning Chancellor Angela Merkel, almost two years after Islamist militants attacked its top editorial staff in Paris.

The magazine also picked on another symbol of post-war German might — Europe’s biggest carmaker Volkswagen, still struggling to recover from its diesel emissions scandal.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

[bctt tweet=”Launch posters showed Merkel sitting on the toilet reading the magazine.” username=””]

“VW backs Merkel,” reads the headline, with a picture showing a VW mechanic fixing 62-year-old Merkel on a hydraulic lift, saying: “A new exhaust pipe and you’ll run for another four years.”

Merkel announced last month she would stand for a fourth term in elections next year.

Launch posters showed Merkel sitting on the toilet reading the magazine, with the slogan: “Charlie Hebdo. It’s liberating.”

The magazine, known in France for ridiculing political and religious leaders, became a symbol for the freedom of expression after two militants broke into an editorial meeting at its Paris office in Jan. 2015 and killed 12 people.

The Islamists accused the magazine of blasphemy for printing cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Some German customers said they were buying the magazine as a gesture of solidarity.

“For me, this is more a feeling that I support this and I want it to continue now that it has just started,” said Tim Wuennemann.

An initial run of 200,000 will be printed in Germany — twice the circulation of the country’s current best-known satirical magazine, Titanic. Some of its contents will be original, some translated from the French.

The boundaries of satire were tested this year when Turkey’s Tayyip Erdogan took legal action against German comedian Jan Boehmermann for broadcasting a satirical poem suggesting the president engaged in bestiality and watched child pornography. (VOA)

 

Next Story

Rights Group calls for more Refugees in Europe on First Death Anniversary of Syrian Toddler Aylan Kurdi’s Death

Since Kurdi’s death, though, more than 4,000 people have died trying to cross the Mediterranean – including hundreds of children – which Egeland called unacceptable

0
199
Map of Europe. Image Source: Wikimedia commons.

August 31, 2016: This week marks the one-year anniversary of the death of a Syrian toddler Aylan Kurdi, whose body washed up on a beach in Turkey, and whose photograph sparked an outpouring of support around the world.

Now, the Norwegian Refugee Council, a human rights group based in Europe, is using the anniversary of the iconic photo to call on European leaders to “stop the loss of lives” on their doorstep.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

“One year after the death of Aylan Kurdi the haemorrhage of human lives on the doorstep to Europe has worsened,” Jan Egeland, head of the NRC. “European leaders promised action and countries promised to fulfil their moral responsibilities. But instead of building bridges they have built walls, and instead of taking their share of responsibility, they have participated in a race to a bottom.”

Representational Image of Refugees. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons.
Representational Image of Refugees. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

According to the International Organization for Migration, European countries combined took in more than 1,000,000 refugees during 2015, but still, Egeland said this isn’t good enough and wants to see more refugees settled in Europe.

“European civilisation, or lack thereof, is defined by how we receive persecuted human beings seeking our protection,” he said.

The photo of the toddler, shown lying face down on the Turkish shoreline as the waves rolled in and out, led to a massive spike in donations to charities and NGOs that help refugees and asylum seekers obtain food, clothing and other goods.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

Save the Children, a U.K.-based child advocacy group reported a 70 percent increase in donations in the 24 hours after the picture was published, while the Migrant Offshore Aid Station, which operates independent rescue boats in the Mediterranean, saw 15 times as much money donated in the 24 hours after the photo was published than any other 24-hour time period in the past.

Since Kurdi’s death, though, more than 4,000 people have died trying to cross the Mediterranean – including hundreds of children – which Egeland called unacceptable.

“European leaders must do more to prevent new tragedies,” he said. (VOA)

ALSO READ: