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Delhi Public Library signs MoU with Indian Public Library Movement (IPLM) to improve Overall Functioning of its Outlets

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May 19, 2017: The Delhi Public Library has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Indian Public Library Movement (IPLM) to improve the overall functioning of its outlets and make them more relevant in the fast-changing times.

The MoU was exchanged in the presence of the Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Culture Mahesh Sharma, who expressed his happiness with the efforts to improve the libraries and hoped that the MoU will bring about a positive change.

The objectives of the MoU are to clearly identify the roles and responsibilities of all the parties as they relate to implement efforts in repositioning different libraries of Delhi Public Library. The understanding is aimed at enabling them to serve citizens better as community engagement, information, knowledge and resource centres.

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The MoU also intends to “strengthen the capacities of the libraries and librarians,” so that they serve the real time needs, especially of the youth. The initiative is set to propel time to time training of librarians on various aspects of revitalisation of libraries and library services.

Introduction of new services in the public libraries are also on the cards as children corner, space for differently abled people, digital resources, multimedia educational content and various outreach programmes also find mention in the understanding.

The Indian Public Library Movement (IPLM), supported by the Global Libraries initiative of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and hosted by Nasscom Foundation, has been conceived to re-vitalise the Indian public libraries and bring them back into the mainstream as inclusive knowledge and information centres catering to the 21st century information needs of communities across India. (IANS)

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Child Rights Summit: Nations Should Spend More on Education Over Weapons

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child rights summit
Displaced Syrian children look out from their tents at Kelbit refugee camp, near the Syrian-Turkish border, in Idlib province, Syria, Jan. 17, 2018. VOA

Countries should spend more on schooling and less on weapons to ensure that children affected by war get an education, a child rights summit heard Monday.

The gathering in Jordan was told that a common thread of war was its devastating impact in keeping children out of school.

Indian Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi, who founded the summit, said ensuring all children around the world received a primary and secondary education would cost another $40 billion annually — about a week’s worth of global military expenditure.

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child rights summit
Nobel Peace Prize laureates Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai listen to speeches during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo, Dec. 10, 2014. VOA

“We have to choose whether we have to produce guns and bullets, or we have to produce books and pencils to our children,” he told the second Laureates and Leaders for Children Summit that gathers world leaders and Nobel laureates.

Global military expenditure reached almost $1.7 trillion in 2016, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF said last year 27 million children were out of school in conflict zones.

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“We want safe schools, we want safe homes, we want safe countries, we want a safe world,” said Satyarthi, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai for his work with children.

Jordan’s Prince Ali bin al-Hussein told the summit, which focused on child refugees and migrants affected by war and natural disasters, that education was “key,” especially for “children on the move.”

“Education can be expensive, but never remotely as close to what is being spent on weapons. … They [children] are today’s hope for a better future,” he told the two-day summit.

Kerry Kennedy, president of Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights, a nonprofit group, described the number of Syrian refugees not in school in the Middle East as “shocking” as the war enters its eighth year.

Kennedy cited a report being released Tuesday by the KidsRights Foundation, an international children’s rights group, which found 40 percent of school-aged Syrian children living in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, and Iraq cannot access education. VOA