Delhi students studying in polluted school air: Report


New Delhi: Giving a hit to the Delhi government’s claims of improvement in the atmosphere of the city through the odd-even scheme, a Greenpeace India study found high levels of metals in the air. Though, the samples were collected since last October.

The high density of metal in air impacts the cognitive and motoric development of a child. Samples were collected from schools in Paschim Vihar, Tagore garden and Meera bagh and testing was done in England.

Report said that most of the sample showed the dangerous level of metallic presence in the air. In Paschim Vihar, the level of cadmium exceeded the safe limit and in Tagore Garden, it was arsenic concentration. Same way in Meera Bagh, the levels of lead and nickel were too much.

The concerning factor is that samples were collected from schools which mean Children are exposed to dangerous air and it can lead them to diseases like cancer.

“Exposure to even small quantities continuously can be hazardous. The result signifies that schoolchildren are exposed to exceeding levels of heavy metals that increase the risk of cancer and developmental problems. More the PM2.5 concentrations, higher will be the exposure to heavy metals,” said Sunil Dahiya, campaigner, Greenpeace India.

Greenpeace report suggested that Delhi needs to take strict action to counter this and reduce the children’s exposure to the polluted atmosphere.

Delhi was declared one of the most polluted city which forced Delhi government to roll out odd even scheme to counter it. Today, coincidently marks the end the practice of odd even scheme. The data of these 15 days will be collected and on the basis of its results, a decision will be taken whether this scheme will be back or not in future.