Digital Learning to Change the Face of Education? Study of Oxford University Proves app EasyPeasy actually Works

The research was jointly funded by Sutton Trust and the Esmée Fairbairn foundation

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A Child Using Tablet, VOA

November 19, 2016: A study at the Oxford University proves that the app to become a better parent actually works. The study was conducted with 144 families, with kids from age 2 to 6, from Bournemouth who used the software EasyPeasy that includes games designed to encourage child development.

The success of the test suggests that schools and local authorities should encourage parents switch to digital education to improve school readiness among children.

According to the professor of Educational Psychology at the Oxford University, Kathy Sylva, “Although there are many parenting programs, there is still limited evidence that they are effective at improving children’s learning or their capacity to make a strong start at school.”

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According to the Guardian, In Yummy Strawberries, one of the tasks from the app, both parents and child would hold a strawberry in a hand while watching the game’s explanation for one minute before eating it. The task was to ask the child to distract themselves from eating the strawberry.

A previous study, known as “marshmallow experiment”, suggested that children who resisted the treat kept in front of them showed more signs of positive personality traits.

The results on EasyPeasy are promising and suggest that we can affect the personality of a child through educating their parents.

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The parents involved in the study reported significant improvements in their child’s behavior. The children were becoming more independent in making decisions and unrelenting in completing more difficult tasks.

The research’s findings supported the experience of parents. The statistics of the study were significant despite the small sample size.

Although the results from the study were moderately successful, the low delivery cost of the app, £35 per child, makes it cost effective and can be easily expanded.

The study stated, “The low cost, digital nature of the intervention provides an innovative route forward for providing parenting support and preschool learning to families of any background.”

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The Guardian stated that the research was jointly funded by the Sutton Trust and the Esmée Fairbairn foundation. The EasyPeasy app originated from a competition in 2014 by the Guys and St. Thomas’s charity and the Design Council.

According to the founder of Sutton trust, Sir Peter Lampl, to improve social mobility in the society, it is important to decrease the gap between the richest and poorest students. We need to break the cycle of disadvantage and tackle this difference.

Prepared by Diksha Arya of NewsGram. Twitter: @diksha_arya53

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