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Divorce: Statistics reveal that men move on faster in India

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

It appears that there is a gender bias even in divorces. According to the statistics compiled by rediff.com, there are more divorced women in India than divorced men.

The ratio between divorced women and divorced men show huge variations across various states. Except for Gujarat, Punjab, Haryana, and Uttar Pradesh, in all other states, the number of divorced women are considerably higher than the number of divorced men.

There are 4022 divorced women for every 1000 divorced men in Kerala, which is the highest in India.

The figures for other southern states are not much better either. Karnataka has a figure of 3127 females per 1000 males. Tamil Nadu and Andra Pradesh have a figure of 2863 and 3052 respectively.

Among the states of East and North-East, Tripura has the highest disparity with 3497 females per 1000 males and Sikkim has the lowest disparity with 1038 females for every 1000 males. West Bengal and Odisha has 2787 and 2813 divorced women per 1000 divorced men.

The figures for the states in Central India and those across Gangetic belt are as follows: Uttar Pradesh: 966, Uttarakhand: 1638, Madhya Pradesh: 1493, Chhattisgarh: 2434, Bihar: 1537, and Jharkhand: 2507.

In Western India, Gujarat and Rajasthan have 935 and 1122 divorced females for every 1000 divorced males respectively. This means that there are more divorced men than divorced women in Gujarat.

The case is same in Punjab and Haryana as well. Punjab has 809 divorced women per 1000 such men, and Haryana has 924:1000 ratio of women to men.

The ratios for Himachal Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir are 1131:1000 and 1349:1000 respectively.

Though the statistics do not say anything regarding the total number of divorces in each state, it clearly establishes that more number of divorced women do not remarry as compared to their male counterparts.

A report published in January by Hindustan Times had revealed that divorce rates in India, especially among young couples were rapidly increasing.

In Mumbai, 11667 divorce cases were filed till November, 2014 as against 5245 such cases in 2010. In Kolkata 8347 cases were filed till November, 2014 as against 2388 cases in 2003.

Out of the 2000 divorce cases filed in the Lucknow family court in 2014, 900 cases were filed by young couple who were married for less than a year.

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  • Vinod

    When a divorce takes place , there will be equal number of men and women affected. I do not understand the statement “there are more divorced women in India than divorced men”

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Women Are Rarely “Put Front And Center” At The Heart Of Climate Action

Feminism doesn't mean excluding men

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Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017.
Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017. VOA

Women must be at the heart of climate action if the world is to limit the deadly impact of disasters such as floods, former Irish president and U.N. rights commissioner Mary Robinson said on Monday.

Robinson, also a former U.N. climate envoy, said women were most adversely affected by disasters and yet are rarely “put front and center” of efforts to protect the most vulnerable.

“Climate change is a man-made problem and must have a feminist solution,” she said at a meeting of climate experts at London’s Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and Entrepreneurship.

“Feminism doesn’t mean excluding men, it’s about being more inclusive of women and – in this case – acknowledging the role they can play in tackling climate change.”

Research has shown that women’s vulnerabilities are exposed during the chaos of cyclones, earthquakes and floods, according to the British think-tank Overseas Development Institute.

In many developing countries, for example, women are involved in food production, but are not allowed to manage the cash earned by selling their crops, said Robinson.

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The lack of access to financial resources can hamper their ability to cope with extreme weather, she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on the sidelines of the event.

“Women all over the world are … on the front lines of the fall-out from climate change and therefore on the forefront of climate action,” said Natalie Samarasinghe, executive director of Britain’s United Nations Association.

“What we — the international community — need to do is talk to them, learn from them and support them in scaling up what they know works best in their communities,” she said at the meeting.

Also read: Climate change can have an effect on the taste of the wines

Robinson served as Irish president from 1990-1997 before taking over as the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, and now leads a foundation devoted to climate justice. (VOA)