Saturday May 26, 2018

Drinking coffee doesn’t trigger diabetes, obesity

0
//
213
Republish
Reprint

London, Maintain your love with coffee as it does not put you at the risk of developing obesity or diabetes, a gene-based study has said.

Danish researchers looked at genes as our genes play a role in how much coffee we drink in the course of a day.

So if you have the special coffee genes, you may be drinking more coffee than those not having the genes.

coffee-and-breakfast1The results showed that coffee neither increases nor decreases the risk of lifestyle diseases like obesity and diabetes.

“We are the first to examine the link of the genes with high consumption of coffee,” said Ask Tybjaeg Nordestgaard from the department of clinical biochemistry at Herlev and Gentofte Hospital in Denmark.

“These genes are completely independent of other lifestyle factors, and, therefore, drinking coffee in itself is not associated with lifestyle diseases,” Nordestgaard added in a paper published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Along with researchers from University of Copenhagen, Nordestgaard analysed DNA and information about coffee drinking and lifestyle diseases from 93,000 Danes from the Copenhagen General Population Study.

The researchers studied the number of genes that affect our desire for coffee and examined whether a higher coffee consumption increases or decreases the risk of developing lifestyle diseases.

“We can see that the coffee genes are surprisingly not associated with a risk of developing Type 2 diabetes or obesity,” they said.

“This suggests that drinking coffee neither causes nor protects against these lifestyle diseases,” added Boerge Nordestgaard, clinical professor from University of Copenhagen. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Study Shows Weight Loss Surgery Can Reduce Risk of Skin Cancer

Bariatric surgery, a weight loss operation, is associated with a 61 per cent decrease in the risk of developing malignant skin cancer, according to a study.

0
//
18
Bariatric Surgery
representational image. Pixabay

Bariatric surgery, a weight loss operation, is associated with a 61 per cent decrease in the risk of developing malignant skin cancer, according to a study.

Melanoma is a deadly form of skin cancer, most closely associated with excessive sun exposure. Obesity is an established risk factor for cancer and some studies indicate that intentional weight loss sometimes reduces the risk.

However, evidence for a link between obesity, weight loss and malignant melanoma is limited.

The new findings showed that bariatric surgery led to a 42 per cent reduced risk of skin cancer in general compared to controls given usual obesity care.

The study “supports the idea that obesity is a melanoma risk factor and indicates that weight loss in individuals with obesity can reduce the risk of bariatric surgery that has increased steadily in many countries over several decades”, said lead author Magdalena Taube from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

Cancer word on newspaper
Cancer. Pixabay

The results were presented at the 2018 European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Austria.

The protective effect of bariatric surgery on skin cancer was observed in a group of 2,007 obese participants who were then followed for a median of 18 years.

These were compared with a control group consisting of 2,040 individuals who matched with the participants who underwent surgery on sex, age, anthropometric measurements, cardiovascular risk factors, psychosocial variables and personality traits.

Also Read: Study Shows that Humans Are Influencing Cancer in Wild Animals

To analyse malignant melanoma incidence, statistical tests were used to compare time to first melanoma cancer diagnosis between the surgery and control groups.

In additional analyses, risk ratios between the surgery and control groups were compared. (IANS)

Next Story