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Egyptian-American Charity Worker released from Prison after nearly 3 years of Detention

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FILE - Aya Hijazi, center, a dual U.S.-Egyptian citizen, is acquitted by an Egyptian court after nearly three years of detention over accusations related to running a foundation dedicated to helping street children, Cairo, April 16, 2017. VOA
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Egyptian-American charity worker Aya Hijazi was released from prison after nearly three years of detention, her lawyer said Wednesday.

The lawyer, Taher Abol Nasr, told the Associated Press that Hijazi was released late Tuesday, two days after a court acquitted her of charges of child abuse that were widely dismissed as bogus by human rights groups and U.S. officials.

Hijazi, a dual national, and her husband had established a foundation to aid street children in 2013, but were arrested along with six others in 2014. It was not immediately clear whether her co-defendants were also released.

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President Donald Trump did not publicly mention the case when he met with Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi earlier this month, but a senior White House official had said ahead of the meeting that the case would be addressed.

It was not immediately clear if Hijazi, 30, would remain in Egypt following her release. Hijazi, who grew up in Falls Church, Virginia, received a degree in conflict resolution from George Mason University in 2009, and then returned to her native country.

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Hijazi’s foundation — named Belady, Arabic for “our nation” — had its offices raided after a man alleged that his son was missing and blamed it on Belady.

Egyptian authorities have clamped down on civil society, particularly human rights groups and other organizations that receive foreign funding. Such groups played a central role in the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak, and pro-government media often present them as part of a conspiracy to undermine the state.

The authorities also arrested thousands of people in the months following the 2013 overthrow of President Mohammed Morsi, mainly his Islamist supporters but also a number of secular and liberal activists. (VOA)

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Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

"We were curious as to whether social support during this 'incubation' period or interim could offset health risks associated with much earlier experiences of abuse,"

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children abuses
Childhood abuses have been linked with many serious health consequences in adulthood including premature mortality, heart disease, stroke and some cancers. Pexels

A strong and supportive relationship in midlife may act as a buffer against the poor health outcomes as well as premature mortality risk in adulthood for the victims of childhood abuses, researchers have claimed.

Childhood abuses have been linked with many serious health consequences in adulthood including premature mortality, heart disease, stroke and some cancers.

But, a social support was found to lower mortality risk by 19 to 26 percent depending on whether it was a severe physical abuse, moderate physical abuse or emotional abuse.

ALSO READ: One out of Two Children face Child Sexual Abuse: The Growing Problem of Child Sexual Abuse in India

child abuse
Social support was also associated with a more modest seven to eight percent lower mortality risk in those who suffered minimally or had no exposure to abuse, the researcher said. Pixabay

 

“The study provides evidence suggesting that experiences long after exposure to abuse can mitigate the mortality risks associated with early abuse,” said post-doctoral student Jessica Chiang, from Northwestern University in the US.

For the study, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, the researchers included 6,000 US adults and examined whether adult social support decreased mortality risk associated with exposure to three types of childhood abuse: severe physical abuse, modest physical abuse, and emotional abuse.

ALSO READ: Adults who experienced Abuse and Neglect in Childhood are less likely to own Home at 50, says a new Research

childhood abuses
“Many of the diseases associated with childhood abuse typically emerge in middle and later stages of adulthood — decades after the abuse actually occurred,” Chiang said. Pixabay

 

“We were curious as to whether social support during this ‘incubation’ period or interim could offset health risks associated with much earlier experiences of abuse,” she added.

The results showed the magnitude of the reduction in mortality risk associated with midlife social support differed between the individuals who reported childhood abuse and those who reported minimal or no childhood abuse. (IANS)

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