Saturday December 16, 2017

Endocrine Disruptors – The emerging public health concern

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By Dr. JK Bhutani

What is an Endocrine Disruptor: A chemical that interferes (or disrupts) with the formation, secretion or functioning of hormones (secreted by endocrine glands) in our body.

Endocrine disruptors, in our environment are a reality and are entering our bodies from the air we breathe, the ambiance we live in, and the food-water-beverages we take. These are far more dangerous than the PM (particulate matter of controversial Delhi’s odd-even fight). Soon it should be the next hot public health concern for the governments as the evidence, from the environment labs regarding their link with various chronic diseases including obesity, diabetes, decreased fertility and some cancers, swells.

Many other developmental, reproductive, neural, immune, and other problems noted in laboratory animals may well be true for humans too. The Endocrine Society of US released a statement on ‘Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)’ recently specifically listing THEIR ROLE in obesity, diabetes, female reproduction, male reproduction, hormone-sensitive cancers in females, prostate cancer in males, thyroid, learning disabilities, attention-deficit-disorder, and some neuro-developmental abnormalities. The epidemic of diabetes and thyroid disorders in India and the role of these chemicals are not well researched but the link may well be more than conjectural.

 

What are the chemicals that make these Endocrine Disruptors

Endocrine disruptors are so ubiquitous! Every daily need from a toothpaste, soap, detergents, body-lotions, perfumes, food additives, potable water, vegetables, milk and stored cereals may contain residues of chemicals, pesticides and other adulterant toxins. The health effects are difficult to assess because of the fact that people are typically exposed to multiple endocrine disruptors simultaneously and the amount and the route of the chemical entering the system is variable.

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A wide and varied range of substances are implicated and some have definite proven role like diethylstilbestrol, dioxin, dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, and some other pesticides. Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical used in  polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins and other interior fixtures in homes and Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), used in packaging consumer foods are entering our systems from  our living rooms and kitchens. They are decoy silent invaders and slow killers of our immunity and defence.

Harmful effects

Endocrine Disruptors can interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action, or elimination of natural hormones in the body. The ‘survival and propagation’ and ‘homeostasis’ is built in our system and all the array of hormones from various endocrine glands like pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, pancreas, testes-ovaries and other scattered endocrine tissues are tools of this process.

The ‘Fight-Flight Response’ and all the stress coping mechanisms are possible only with these hormones. The disruption of these vital molecules by the extraneous chemicals is quite logical and the evidence based modern medicine has just to corroborate it. The low dose, the wide multiple effects and the ubiquitous exposure makes endocrine disrupting chemicals difficult to handle.

Prevention

We cannot avoid these in current ‘anything-for-money’ times. The global markets and poor regulatory mechanisms of developing countries and global suppliers only add to the load of toxic exposures on us. A public awareness movement is needed to check the onslaught of harmful chemicals that may act as endocrine disruptors.

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A few useful tips in this regard are:

  • Eat only as much as you need! You will never repent eating less and you shall eat fewer toxins too.
  • Eat fresh and avoid preservative rich processed/packed foods. Grow some vegetables and fruit in your kitchen-garden. Wash the vegetables/fruits well, Wash grains and dry before use, Pool a cow and a farm if possible and Raise a voice for organic farming.
  • Do not use plastics for food cooking or serving. Avoid disposables. Finally, cook well and reject if you find any unpleasant odour.

 

Dr J.K. Bhutani, MD is a protagonist of preventive and promotive health care based on austere biology and facilitating self-healing powers of human organism. Twitter: @drjkbhutani

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Kidney disease may increase the risk of Diabetes: says a study

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Kidney disease may increase the risk of diabetes.
Kidney disease may increase the risk of diabetes. IANS

New York, Dec 12: If you are suffering from kidney dysfunction, you may be at high risk of developing diabetes, finds a study.

The risk may be attributed to the rising level of urea — the nitrogen-containing waste product in blood, which comes from the breakdown of protein in foods.

Kidneys normally remove urea from the blood, but it can build up when kidney function slows down, resulting in greater insulin resistance as well as secretion in the body.

“We have known for a long time that diabetes is a major risk factor for kidney disease, but now we have a better understanding that kidney disease, through elevated levels of urea, also raises the risk of diabetes,” said the Ziyad Al-Aly, Assistant Professor at the Washington University in St. Louis.

“When urea builds up in the blood because of kidney dysfunction, it often results in increased insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion,” Ziyad added.

The findings, published in the journal Kidney International, are significant because urea levels can be lowered through medication, diet — for example, by eating less protein — and other means, thereby allowing for improved treatment and possible prevention of diabetes, the researchers said.

For the study, the team evaluated the records of 1.3 million adults without diabetes over a five-year period, beginning in 2003.

Out of these, 117,000 of those without diabetes — or 9 per cent — had elevated urea levels, signalling poor kidney function and were at 23 per cent higher risk of developing diabetes. (IANS)

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Poor Dental Health can Lead to Obesity in Children

The study found a direct relationship between poor dental health leading to a rise in BMI (Body Mass Index) and extra body fat.

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Poor Dental Health can Lead to Obesity in Children
Poor Dental Health can Lead to Obesity in Children. Pixabay
  • Worried about your child’s obesity problems? It’s high time you curbed his love for sugary drinks and junk food. A little focus on dental care may also prevent your child gaining excess weight, says a new study.

The study found a direct relationship between poor dental health leading to a rise in BMI (Body Mass Index) and extra body fat.

“Weight can be a sensitive subject, but if you talk about eating behaviors alongside dental health, you are looking at the issue from a different angle,” said Louise Arvidsson, a doctoral student at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

“The question is whether a healthy diet can have the effect also in young children. There has been a lot of focus on physical activity and mental health in children, but diet is an increasingly recognized aspect.”

The researchers reviewed the eating behavior, body fat and dental health of 271 small children. The height, weight and food intake of the children were kept under observation for one day and then checked for the prevalence of cariogenic microorganisms in saliva.

The results found that the children who had a higher amount of carries bacteria also had higher BMI and worse eating habits.

The children were suggested to consume whole grain products, 400-500 grams of fruit and vegetables per day, fish two to three times a week and a low intake of sugar and saturated fat.

Arvidsson mentioned in the thesis, conducted at the University’s Sahlgrenska Academy, that with good food comes increased self-esteem, better relationships with friends and fewer emotional problems

Rather, parents who try to change the regime of their children by asking them to eat less during childhood can see serious repercussions of overweight problems in later life.(IANS)

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Intake of Coffee can Reduce the risk of Death for Kidney Patients

Drinking Coffee may increase the lifespan of patients with chronic kidney disease.

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Drinking Coffee reduces mortality in Kidney patients
Drinking Coffee reduces mortality in Kidney patients. Pixabay
  • Want to live longer? Charge up on your cup of coffee. According to a study, caffeine consumption may prolong the lifespan of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Drinking coffee can Reduce mortality 

The findings showed a dose-dependent inverse association between caffeine and all-cause mortality.

People who had the highest intake of coffee had 24 percent lower risks of dying, while those in the second, third quartile of caffeine consumption had 12 percent and 22 percent lower risk.

“These results suggest that advising patients with CKD to drink more caffeine may reduce their mortality. This would represent a simple, clinically beneficial, and inexpensive option,” said Miguel Bigotte Vieira from Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, in Portugal.

However, “this benefit should ideally be confirmed in a randomised clinical trial”, Vieira added.

For the study, the team examined the association of caffeine consumption with mortality among 2328 patients with CKD. The results will be presented at the ongoing ASN Kidney Week 2017 in New Orleans.

Moreover, this observational study cannot prove that drinking coffee reduces the risk of death in patients with CKD, but only suggests the possibility of such a protective effect, Vieira stressed.

Drinking coffee can also reduce diabetes risk, revealed a reported in the American Chemical Society Journal of Natural Products.(IANS)