Saturday May 26, 2018
Home India Environmental...

Environmental archaeology: Towards a culture-connected nation

0
//
57
Republish
Reprint

Kolkata: MK Dhavalikar, noted Indian archaeologist, pushed for an environmental archaeology boost in India, which deals with reconstructing relationships between people and their surrounding culture.

He stressed on gathering people-centric data and connecting archaeological findings to culture rather than studying structures in isolation.

“The question is why must we study something? So what if structures exist at a particular location… now the emphasis must be on what these meant for the people. Environmental archaeology is the area to focus on for India,” Dhavalikar stated on sidelines of a lecture on Lord Ganesha at the Indian Museum here.

Dhavalikar also inaugurated an exhibition on the Hindu deity from the collection of the museum.

The expert historian observed that previously social archaeology was not being practiced in India but now with the advent of technology it has become possible to connect archaeological findings with the civilization that existed in the past.

“If there was a break in culture, then why did it happen? Was there a famine or drought? This is possible through technology,” said the former director of Deccan College, Pune.

MK Dhavalikar www.iitgn.ac.in
MK Dhavalikar
www.iitgn.ac.in

He said the concurrent study of environmental data such as pollen cores, plant and animal remains, fossil records, sediment layering, changes in river meanders, ocean levels, salinity records and other inanimate data can shed light on ancient man.

The 85-year-old suggested an inter-disciplinary approach to the subject to unravel people-centric data. Dhavalikar is associated with the Inamgaon excavations in Maharashtra which revealed multiple cultural phases and is considered a landmark in Indian archaeological history.

(IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

A New Tool May Aid Patients To Detect Urine Blockage

Surgeons are developing a new smartphone-based tool that can detect urethral or urine blockage, potentially making it easier for patients to test themselves for the condition from the comfort of their own homes.

0
//
17
Americans have been oberved being online almost everytime.
representational image

Surgeons are developing a new smartphone-based tool that can detect urethral or urine blockage, potentially making it easier for patients to test themselves for the condition from the comfort of their own homes.

The novel technique could take high-speed photography which could capture subtle differences between a normal steady stream of liquid and a stream of liquid with an obstruction.

Urethral strictures are a slowing or blocking of the natural flow of urine due to an injury or infection. It is normally diagnosed by uroflowmetry, a test administered at a physician’s office.

“The problem is that patient follow-up after we treat this condition is very poor,” said Matthew Gretzer, Associate Professor at the University of Arizona in the US.

“But we need patients to come back to our clinic for a uroflow test to determine if the obstruction is still present,” he added.

representational image

In order to test Gretzer’s hypothesis on high-speed photography, the team created a model of a urethral structure using tubing hooked to a saline bag that could drain through.

Saline fluid was passed through the tubing with and without blockages, created using 3D printed strictures, placed within the tubing. High-speed photography captured both the regular and blocked stream of liquid exiting the tube.

Gretzer contended that photos can be a medium to diagnose blockages and he hopes that patients could send him these images to analyse and make the diagnosis. He plans to create a mobile app which can be downloaded by the patients.

“All patients would need to do is take high-speed images of their urine flow using a strobe light,” Gretzer said.

“Strobe light apps are readily available right now for people to use on their phones”.

Also Read: Astronauts from Clemson University in US Believe Human Urine Can Help Safer Space Travel

According to the researchers, as fluid exits an opening, a natural breakpoint occurs where the liquid stream forms droplets, but with obstructions in place, it changes.

The results showed that by analysing photos, they could measure the length to this point of droplet formation. This length then directly related to the presence of an obstruction in the tube. (IANS)

Next Story