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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg praises Narendra Modi for connecting with masses via Facebook

To classify the objectionable content, the Menlo Park-based company will use artificial intelligence and it wants to start with the cases in 2017

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India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi celebrating Indian diversity via museum. VOA
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New York, Feb 17, 2017: As India conducts assembly elections in five states, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has applauded Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s style of working using the social networking platform to establish a meaningful dialogue between the people and the government.

Modi recently asked his ministers to share their meetings and information on Facebook so that they can receive direct feedback from citizens, the Facebook CEO wrote in a 5,700-worded post on its “Community Standard” Page.

Zuckerberg hailed the use of social media in election campaigning and gave the examples of countries like India, the US, Kenya and Indonesia where leaders were active on social platforms and connected well with the people.

“In recent campaigns around the world — from India and Indonesia across Europe to the United States — we’ve seen that the candidate with the largest and most engaged following on Facebook usually wins. Just as TV became the primary medium for civic communication in the 1960s, social media is becoming this in the 21st century,” he wrote.

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“We can help establish direct dialogue and accountability between people and our elected leaders,” Zuckerberg added.

He said the use of social platforms created an opportunity for people to connect with their representatives at all levels.

“In the last few months, we have already helped our community double the number of connections between people and our representatives by making it easier to connect with all our representatives in one click,” Zuckerberg noted.

At the same time, he said, Facebook wanted its users to define what is “objectionable”, eventually empowering them to decide how much nudity and violence they are comfortable seeing.

“The idea is to give everyone in the community options for how they would like to set the content policy for themselves,” Zuckerberg wrote.

“Where is your line on nudity? On violence? On graphic content? On profanity? What you decide will be your personal settings. We will periodically ask you these questions to increase participation and so you don’t need to dig around to find them,” he asked.

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The letter also noted that for those who do not make a decision, the policies decided by majority of people in their region would be enforced.

To classify the objectionable content, the Menlo Park-based company will use artificial intelligence and it wants to start with the cases in 2017. (IANS)

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Facebook clarifies how it collects data when you’re logged out

Facebook is embroiled in a widening scandal that a British data firm called Cambridge Analytica improperly gathered detailed information on its 87 million users

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Facebook was accused of leaking data to Cambridge Analytica earlier this year.

After Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified in front of the US Congress last week, the company on Tuesday tried to clarify on questions how it collects data when people are not directly using the website or app.

Many websites and apps use Facebook services to make their content and ads more engaging and relevant.

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The social media app is in news for all the wrong reasons lately. VOA

“Apps and websites that use our services, such as the Like button or Facebook Analytics, send us information to make their content and ads better,” David Baser, Product Management Director at Facebook, wrote in a blog post.

In return for that information, Facebook helps those websites serve up relevant ads or receive analytics that help them understand how people use their services.

“When you visit a site or app that uses our services, we receive information even if you’re logged out or don’t have a Facebook account. This is because other apps and sites don’t know who is using Facebook,” Baser added.

Many companies offer these types of services and, like Facebook, they also get information from the apps and sites that use them.

“Twitter, Pinterest and LinkedIn all have similar Like and Share buttons to help people share things on their services. Google has a popular analytics service. And Amazon, Google and Twitter all offer login features,” Facebook said.

These companies — and many others — also offer advertising services. When you visit a website, your browser (for example Chrome, Safari or Firefox) sends a request to the site’s server. The browser shares your IP address so the website knows where on the Internet to send the site content.

The website also gets information about the browser and operating system (for example Android or Windows) you’re using because not all browsers and devices support the same features.

Also Read: Google Home To Be Your Best Friend Now

“It also gets cookies, which are identifiers that websites use to know if you’ve visited before. This can help with things like saving items in your shopping cart,” Facebook explained. “So when a website uses one of our services, your browser sends the same kind of information to Facebook as the website receives. We also get information about which website or app you’re using, which is necessary to know when to provide our tools,” Baser noted.

There are three main ways in which Facebook uses the information it gets from other websites and apps.

“Providing our services to these sites or apps; improving safety and security on Facebook; and enhancing our own products and services,” Baser said.

“We also use the information we receive from websites and apps to help protect the security of Facebook. For example, receiving data about the sites a particular browser has visited can help us identify bad actors,” he posted.

Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook needs to fix itself. Pixabay

Zuckerberg, appearing before the US Congress last week, told the lawmakers that his own personal data was part of 87 million users’ that was “improperly shared” with British political consultancy firm Cambridge Analytica.

“We don’t sell the data. We use the data that people put into the system in order to make them more relevant. I believe people own their content,” he told the US Congress.

Facebook is embroiled in a widening scandal that a British data firm called Cambridge Analytica improperly gathered detailed information on its 87 million users. IANS