Friday May 25, 2018
Home Uncategorized Falling space...

Falling space objects: Officials stupefied as ice crashes into house in America while plane tire rips through roof in Canada

0
//
141
Republish
Reprint

images (1)

By NewsGram Staff Writer

The source of a large ball of ice that fell from the sky recently, leaving a gaping hole in the roof of a Moxee, Washington home is being looked into by authorities.

While eating dinner at their home on Tuesday, Dwaine Morrison’s teenage son and daughter were stunned to a hear a loud bang. A chunk of ice measuring 1 foot by 1 foot and weighing 8 pounds, had crashed through the family’s roof and attic, breaking through drywall and pink insulation, and finally had landed in a walk-in closet.

No one in the house was hurt and the pictures of the mess were texted when the children went upstairs.

“This thing had to be bowling-ball to volleyball size. It had some velocity to it. It came from high up”, Morrison told ABC News today.

ht_ice_ball_roof_hole_jc_150625_4x3_992
Image courtesy Dwaine Morrison

The Federal Aviation Administration(FAA) said it was investigating what flights might have been overhead at the time the block of ice fell.

As the family awaited news from the FAA and their insurance company, the hole in the Morrisons’ roof was patched up. Morrison said the family was storing the ice in a freezer in their garage.

A similar incident occurred in St. Laurent, Quebec, where the residents were reeling after the wheel of a jet fell from the sky and ripped through their roof in the wee hours of Wednesday.

“The renter of the third-floor apartment was not there at the time a plane tire crashed into the house”, said the homeowner who did not want to be identified.

According to the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, the tire belonged to a Falcon 10 corporate jet aircraft, which landed safely nearby at Pierre Elliot Trudeau Airport shortly after the incident.

CTV_plane_wheel_hole_jef_150625_4x3_992
Image courtesy CTV News
Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Washington Becomes First State to Approve Net-neutrality Rules

“We know that when D.C. fails to act, Washington state has to do so,”

0
//
32
net-neutrality
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee speaks after signing a bill, March 5, 2018, in Olympia, Washington, that makes Washington the first state to set up its own net-neutrality requirements in response to the FCC's recent repeal of Obama-era rules. VOA

Washington became the first state Monday to set up its own net-neutrality requirements after U.S. regulators repealed Obama-era rules that banned internet providers from blocking content or impairing traffic.

“We know that when D.C. fails to act, Washington state has to do so,” Gov. Jay Inslee said before signing the measure that lawmakers passed with bipartisan support. “We know how important this is.”

The Federal Communications Commission voted in December to gut U.S. rules that meant to prevent broadband companies such as Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet.

ALSO READ: What will be the Fate of Net Neutrality after Being Repealed?

Because the FCC prohibited state laws from contradicting its decision, opponents of the Washington law have said it would lead to lawsuits.

Net-neutrality
Inslee said he was confident of its legality, saying “the states have a full right to protect their citizens.” Pixabay

Oregon law has not been signed

The new law also requires internet providers to disclose information about their management practices, performance, and commercial terms. Violations would be enforceable under the state’s Consumer Protection Act.

While several states introduced similar measures this year seeking to protect net neutrality, only Oregon and Washington passed bills. But Oregon’s measure wouldn’t put any new requirements on internet providers.

It would stop state agencies from buying internet service from any company that blocks or prioritizes specific content or apps, starting in 2019. It’s unclear when Oregon’s measure would be signed into law.

Washington state was among more than 20 states and the District of Columbia that sued in January to try and block the FCC’s action. There are also efforts by Democrats to undo the move in Congress.

Net-neutrality
Governors in five states — Hawaii, New Jersey, New York, Montana, and Vermont — have signed executive orders related to net-neutrality issues, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Pixabay

ALSO READ: Zuckerberg in favor of 100 percent net neutrality

Expect new rules by mid-June

Big telecom companies have said net neutrality rules could undermine investment in broadband and introduce uncertainty about what are acceptable business practices. Net-neutrality advocates say the FCC decision would harm innovation and make it harder for the government to crack down on internet providers who act against consumer interests.

The FCC’s new rules are not expected to go into effect until later this spring. Washington’s law will take effect mid-June.

Messages left with the Broadband Communications Association of Washington, which opposed the bill, were not immediately returned. (VOA)