Tuesday December 12, 2017
Home Uncategorized Florida decla...

Florida declares state of emergency ahead of storm

0
14
Weather - WESH Home
Weather – WESH Home

Washington:  Florida Governor Rick Scott declared on Friday a state of emergency ahead of a tropical storm which was expected to hit the state from Sunday into next week and pose a “severe threat to the entire state”.

After dumping torrential rain in the eastern Caribbean on Thursday, tropical storm “Erika” is traversing the northeastern Carribean Sea with maximum sustained winds of about 90 km per hour and the National Hurricane Centre has predicted that from the upcoming Sunday to Wednesday, the storm will travel through Florida’s peninsula, said an executive order by the governor.

Four people died and several others were missing as tropical storm Erika hit the Caribbean island nation of Dominica on Thursday, according to Xinhua.

A visually impaired senior citizen and two children were killed when a mudslide crashed into their house in the southeast of the island, and another man’s body was found near his home following a mudslide in the capital city of Roseau, according to reports monitored in Kingston, Jamaica.

The storm has dumped a general rainfall of about 15 inches (388 mm) on Dominica within 24 hours, unleashing serious flooding and mudslides that damaged roads and houses. Electricity and water supplies were cut in 80 percent of the island.

(IANS)

 

Next Story

Aftermath of Harvey : Sewa International Rescues Stranded Texans. Here’s How You Can Help Too!

As hurricane Harvey left the streets swamped, Sewa International volunteers took to the ground to offer assistance. The good news is you can help, too!

0
38
Sewa international
Sewa volunteers continue to smile, even in the face of adversity. Sewa International website

Houston, September 5, 2017 : For over a week in August, Houston, home to almost six million people, became a city under siege. As hurricane Harvey left the streets swamped and the people marooned without food and water, Sewa International volunteers in Houston took to the ground to undertake relief and rescue operations.

Sewa International is a Hindu faith-based, nonprofit service organization that specializes in undertaking disaster relief and rehabilitation programs.

Living up to their motto, ‘Together we serve better’ and smiling even in the face of adversity, teams of volunteers constantly coordinated relief efforts undertaken by Sewa volunteers in their respective local Houston municipalities along with helping people find shelter during the heavy rains. Additionally, the volunteers also delivered food to people stranded during the storm.

In the aftermath of the destructive tropical storm, relief efforts by Sewa International volunteers, largely assisted by the Indian community in Houston, continue to provide rescue and respite to the victims of hurricane Harvey.  Volunteers are committed to rescuing people stranded on the roads in their trucks and boats while doctors associated with the organization are offering free medical consultation.

Sewa Hot Line: (281) 909-7392 / (281) 909-SEWA

Sewa International is aiming to provide survivors with emergency supplies like food, water, shelter and medicine, along with assistance in the long run to help flood-affected Texans recover and rebuild their property.

The Houston chapter of Sewa International is now appealing to all businesses and non-profit organizations to join hands in helping Texans deal with these stressful times and offer aid in whichever manner they can. All resources will be listed in Sewa International’s help directory on their website and will be publicized throughout the community.

hurricane harvey
Sewa International urges citizens to come forward and assist victims of hurricane Harvey

People wanting to pitch in from afar can donate to Sewa International and assist the victims affected by the storm.

You can extend assistance by donating money or registering yourself as a volunteer with Sewa International for home cleaning, and distribution of food and emergency kits.

***

All donations and registrations can be made at the Sewa International website here

Sewa International volunteers can be reached at their Hot Line: (281) 909-7392 / (281) 909-SEWA


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.
Click here- www.newsgram.com/donate

Next Story

For the First Time in USA, 53-year-old convict Mark Asay was Executed using Etomidate in Lethal Injection

Etomidate is the drug which was used for Mark Asay's execution

0
47
Mark Asay was executed using Etomidate
Mark Asay was executed using Etomidate. Pixabay
  • Etomidate was invented by scientists from Janssen Pharmaceuticals 
  • The reason behind conviction of Mark Asay last year was that in 1988 he racially motivated killing of 2 men in Jacksonville, Florida
  • Before he shot Booker, he called him a racial epithet

Florida (USA), August 25, 2017: A 53-year-old convict Mark Asay was executed using a new drug called Etomidate for lethal injection on 24 August 2017. This drug has not been used before in the US.

Mark Asay was executed reportedly and one of the three drugs used for lethal injection was etomidate. It’s the first time that in execution they used the drug etomidate.

Earlier midazolam was used for executions but now it is harder to get this drug as some drug manufacturers didn’t want it to be used for executions. Now, Etomidate is a substitution for midazolam.

According to CNN report, Greg Panico, spokesman for the company said, “Etomidate, an intravenous anesthetic, was invented by scientists from Janssen Pharmaceuticals in the 1960s

According to WJAX report, “This month, the Florida Supreme Court rejected arguments from Mark Asay’s attorneys that the new drug would cause too much pain.”  Florida’s highest court said that the inmate Mark Asay had not shown that it would result in more pain and dismissed a motion to block the execution.

The reason behind conviction of Mark Asay last year was that in 1988 he racially motivated killing of 2 men in Jacksonville, Florida.

Also Read: Women-Centric Drug Rehabilitation Centers in Hyderabad is Saving Young Girls from Recreational Drugs like LSD

The two men whom the jury found him guilty of murdering were Robert Lee Booker, who was black and Robert McDowell.  “Before he shot Booker, he called him a racial epithet. Prosecutors say he killed McDowell, who was dressed as a woman, after saying he would pay him for sex,” mentions WJAX report.

“The execution marks Florida’s first since The US Supreme Court ruling temporarily halted the practice in early 2016, saying the state’s sentencing process was unconstitutional because it gave judges, rather than juries, too much power in deciding whether to execute an inmate,” mentions CNN report.

On 24 August 2017, US Supreme Court denied a stay for execution request in Asay’s case and it was scheduled that he would die by injection after 6 p.m. EST. It was also revealed that Asay didn’t have any pending petitions along with the Florida Supreme Court.

In 1979, the death penalty was reinstituted by the state and since then, Mark James Asay is the first white man to be sentenced for the death penalty in Florida for killing a black man.


 

NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.
Click here- www.newsgram.com/donate

Next Story

Mudslide Disaster in Africa: Bodies Were ‘Just Being Washed’ Away, Says an Aid Worker of Sierra Leone

Bodies continue to arrive at Freetown's overwhelmed central morgue, with corpses laid on the floor and the ground outside

0
73
Sierra Leone
People wearing protective suits hold hands as they cross a river after a mudslide in the mountain town of Regent, Sierra Leone, Aug. 15, 2017, in this still image taken from a video. VOA

When aid worker Idalia Amaya arrived at the scene of the mudslide that devastated Sierra Leone’s capital Freetown, she was horrified to find homes washed away, entire villages engulfed by mud, and corpses floating down the streets.

“Bodies were just being washed down streams … so many people were crying and wailing,” said Amaya, an emergency response coordinator for Catholic Relief Services (CRS).

“It was a horrible sight — it was devastating,” the U.S. aid worker told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by phone on Wednesday, two days after witnessing the mud’s deadly fallout.

A mountainside collapsed on Monday morning in the town of Regent, burying dozens of homes as people slept and killing at least 400. Women and children were hit the hardest in what is one of Africa’s deadliest mudslides in decades.

FILE - People inspect the damage after a mudslide in the mountain town of Regent, Sierra Leone, Aug. 14, 2017.
FILE – People inspect the damage after a mudslide in the mountain town of Regent, Sierra Leone, Aug. 14, 2017. VOA

Rescue workers have uncovered about 400 bodies so far, but that number is likely to surpass 500 as the search persists, Freetown’s chief coroner Seneh Dumbuya said Tuesday.

“The chance of finding more survivors is slim to none,” Amaya said. “It is so difficult to search in the mud.”

“A lot of victims were women and children, as men had left for work early in the morning. It is heartbreaking to see fathers and husbands who have lost all of their relatives.”

At least 3,000 people have been left homeless — and urgently need food, shelter and health care — while another 600 are missing, according to the Red Cross.

ALSO READ: UN: Most Deaths From Natural Disasters Occur in Poor Countries 

“Many people are reliving trauma they suffered during Ebola,” said Amaya, referring to the world’s worst recorded outbreak of the disease, which ravaged the former British colony from 2014 to 2016, infecting 14,000 people and killing 4,000.

“They are working around the clock to dig out survivors, support those in need, and make the best of the situation,” Amaya added. “I am struck by the resilience of people who have been through civil war, Ebola and deadly floods.”

Bodies continue to arrive at Freetown’s overwhelmed central morgue, with corpses laid on the floor and the ground outside.

The authorities and aid agencies are preparing to bury the dead in several Freetown cemeteries in coming days, CRS said.

As hundreds of people queued outside the morgue, Amaya said Freetown was struggling to come to terms with its latest disaster.

“It still feels very raw,” she said. “But people are coming together, grieving together, and starting the healing process.”(VOA)