Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves “Artificial Pancreas” that help diabetic patients manage Blood Sugar Levels

Medtronic's new device is going to be a big relief to the Type 1 diabetes patients

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Representational image. Wikimedia
  • FDA regulators have already given approval to this device named “MiniMed 670G” for Type 1 diabetes patients who are at least 14 years old
  • A device was developed by Medtronic an Ireland-based device manufacturer to help diabetes patients to manage their blood sugar levels
  • Medtronic is also testing the device on pediatric patients

September 30, 2016: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a first-of-a-Kind “artificial pancreas” a device, which was developed by Medtronic to help diabetes patients to manage their blood sugar levels on Wednesday. With the help of this device, patients can easily monitor blood sugar levels and supply insulin.

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Type 1 diabetes patients manage their insulin through multiple injections throughout the day or a drug pump that delivers it through a tube. Their own pancreas doesn’t make insulin, a hormone needed to turn food into energy. Due to this, they face increased risks of dangerously high blood-sugar levels, heart disease and many other health problems, reported AP.

This new device is going to be a big relief to the Type 1 diabetes patients.

According to the AP report, FDA regulators have already given approval to this device named “MiniMed 670G” for Type 1 diabetes patients, who are at least 14-years-old. This device consists of a drug pump, a sensor that measures blood sugar and delivering insulin as needed. It wirelessly links up an insulin pump and glucose monitor, allowing patients to partly turn over the process of testing and adjusting their blood sugar levels.

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After studying the device for three months with more than 120 patients, the Food and Drug Administration has approved it. The study reported no major adverse events such as dangerously low blood sugar, showing that the device is safe for those 14 years and up, regulators said in a release.

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Medtronic is also testing the device on pediatric patients. One such patient is 13-year-old Jonathan Platt of the Los Angeles area, who is still using his device after the completion of the trial. “For our family, it’s been life-changing,” his mother, Angie Platt said to AP.

She said that after an initial adjustment period, blood sugar imbalances that prompt middle-of-the-night trips to Jonathan’s room have been reduced from several times a night to half a dozen times, a month.

– prepared by Aakash Mandyal of NewsGram. Twitter: @Aakashsen6

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  • Antara

    This will prove to be extremely helpful for the diabetic patients!

  • Anubhuti Gupta

    A great invention for diabetic patients!