Tuesday May 22, 2018
Home Indian Diaspora Four Indian-A...

Four Indian-Americans selected new members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

0
//
96
Republish
Reprint

AmericanAcademy605

By NewsGram  Staff Writer

Four Indian-Americans, Sanjeev Arora, Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Ravindran Kannan and Renu Malhotra, have been selected by the renowned American Academy of Arts and Science for its class of 2015.

There are 197 new members in this year’s class, which includes names like Pulitzer Prize-winner Holland Cotter, singer-songwriter Judy Collins, Nike co-founder Philip Knight, Nobel Prize winner Brian Kobilka, Tony Award winner Audra McDonald, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and novelist Tom Wolfe.

Sanjeev Arora is a theoretical computer scientist, known for his work on Probabilistically Checkable Proofs (PCP) theorem. He is currently working as the Charles C. Fitzmorris Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University. He received the ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award in 1995 for his doctorate thesis on PCP theorem. In 2001, he was honored with the Godel Prize for the same.

Sangeeta N. Bhatia is a biological engineer and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Based on her investigative research into the application of micro- and nano-technology for tissue repair and regeneration, she was inducted into the class. In the MIT Technology Review, she was among the top 100 innovators in the world under 35 years of age.

Ravindran Kannan works as a principal researcher at Microsoft Research India, where he leads the algorithms research group. He is also the first guest faculty of Computer Science and Automation Department of Indian Institute of Science.

Renu Malhotra is an American physicist known for her work on the orbital resonance between Pluto and Neptune. There’s an asteroid, 6698 Malhotra, named after her.

IANS reported Don Randel, the Chairman of the academy’s Board of Directors, as saying, “We are honored to elect a new class of extraordinary women and men to join our distinguished membership.”

“Each new member is a leader in his or her field and has made a distinct contribution to the nation and the world. We look forward to engaging them in the intellectual life of this vibrant institution,” he added.

According to the report, the new class will be inducted at a ceremony on October 10 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Number of Students Opting for Science or Tech Are On Rise in India

India leads the world in the number of students getting bachelors degrees in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects, according to the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD).

0
//
21
Sydney-based University of New South Wales (UNSW) has instituted 61 scholarships to attract
Representational Image, Pixabay

India leads the world in the number of students getting bachelors degrees in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects, according to the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD).

Of about 5 million students who received their bachelor’s degrees in 2012 in STEM subjects worldwide, 29.2 per cent were from India, UNCTAD’s Technology and Innovation Report 2018 released on Tuesday said.

China came next with 26 per cent of the STEM graduates. The EU accounted for 9.5 per cent of STEM graduates that year and the US for 6 per cent, the report said.

The report used statistics from 2012 and said the total number of bachelors-equivalent degrees awarded that year was 20 million.

The wide gulf in the numbers of students graduating in STEM explains why the US relies on such a large number of foreigners, especially Indians, to fill its technology workforce needs.

“Many countries are witnessing skills shortages in the fields of digital technologies and many employers report difficulties in filling high-skill vacancies,” UNCTAD said, citing a 2016 worldwide survey by ManpowerGroup on talent shortage that found that 40 per cent of employers reported difficulties in filling positions.

So, if your child is preparing for IIT-JEE or NEET from any of the reputed centres like Aakash Institute, as a parent, it's your responsibility to help your child find the right study time
study, representational image, Pixabay

According to India’s University Grants Commission, 10.7 million students were studying science, engineering/technology or computer science in 2016-17, although it did not give a breakdown between undergraduate and postgraduate levels or by year of study.

They made up 36 per cent of those studying in universities and colleges, UGC statistics showed.

Looking to the future, UNCTAD cautioned that “there were indications that educational institutions were not keeping pace with technological advances during the current transition period”.

It urged educational institutions to “react with agility” to the rapid pace of technology and the labour market changes and said this may require “significant transformations” in the education and training systems.

With the widespread use of artificial intelligence and robots looming on the horizon, the report said that “rapid technological progress required the labour force to develop a broader range of skills, focusing on humans’ comparative advantage, to increase employability”.

Also Read: India-Trained ‘Wrongly Educated’ Monks Banned by China

UNCTAD called for broadbasing education and said: “In the new technological landscape, there is a need for generic, core or fundamental skills such as literacy, numeracy and academic skills, together with basic financial and entrepreneurial skills and increasingly, basic digital and even coding skills.” (IANS)