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Girl students ask for intervention from DCW over gender bias

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A supporter of defeated Iranian presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi shouts slogans during riots in Tehran on June 13, 2009. Hardline incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was declared winner by a landslide in Iran's hotly-disputed presidential vote, triggering riots by opposition supporters and furious complaints of cheating from his defeated rivals. AFP PHOTO/OLIVIER LABAN-MATTEI (Photo credit should read OLIVIER LABAN-MATTEI/AFP/Getty Images)
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By NewsGram Staff-Writer

Around 250 girl students from three universities have written to the Delhi Commission for Women (DCW), asking intervention on alleged gender bias in their hostels. In an online petition directed to DCW chairperson Swati Maliwal, girls demanded equal rights.

The issue raised by the students was that of restriction from stepping out of the hostel after 8 pm. A similar deadline was set by Jamia Milia Islamia University in its hostels. On that, the commission sent out a notice to Jamia’s Vice Chancellor asking explanation on why such a ban has been imposed on the girls?

These students belong to Jawaharlal Nehru University, Ambedkar University, and Delhi University. They are objecting the issue of ‘moral policing’ by Universities.

The petition stated that such ‘sexist’ practices and regulations are highly discriminatory. Not only Jamia, various other educational institutes in Delhi are encouraging these actions toward safeguarding women, but are rather derogatory to their freedom. Terming these restrictions as ‘pro-women’, colleges are hiding from installing adequate safety measures. It quoted, “We really do feel that safe city cannot be built by caging hundreds of young women in hostels or just by fixing CCTV cameras.”

Students demanded DCW to conduct an inspection of hostels around Delhi and held meetings in deciding a way through the issue. DCW claimed that they are yet to receive the letter.

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Boys tend to do better in science exams than girls

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Boys tend to do better in science exams than girls
Boys tend to do better in science exams than girls. wikimedia commons

New York, Dec 31, 2017: Boys tend to outperform girls in high-stakes science tests, but it is not because they are better students, according to researchers. The study, published in the journal Plos One, showed that performance gaps between male and female students increased or decreased based on whether instructors emphasised or de-emphasised the value of exams.

“This is not simply due to a ‘watering down’ of poor performance through the use of easy points,” said one of the researchers Sehoya Cotner, associate professor at the University of Minnesota. “Rather, on the exams themselves, women perform on par with men when the stakes are not so high,” Cotner said. The findings suggest that changing how instructors assess students could help close the achievement gap between male and female students in some science courses.

The results were based on a year-long study of students in nine introductory biology courses. The researchers found that female students did not under-perform in courses where exams count for less than half of the total course grade. In a separate study, instructors changed the curriculum in three different courses to place higher or lesser value on high-stakes exams (for example, midterms and finals) and observed gender-biased patterns in performance.

“When the value of exams is changed, performance gaps increase or decrease accordingly,” Cotner said. These findings build on recent research that showed that on average, women’s exam performance is adversely affected by test anxiety. By moving to a “mixed model” of student assessment — including lower-stakes exams, as well as quizzes and other assignments — instructors can decrease well established performance gaps between male and female students in science courses, the study added. (IANS)

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