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Girls spend 160 Million more Hours than Boys doing household chores everyday: UNICEF

Girls between 10 and 14 years old spend twice as much time than boys, or 120 million hours more each day, doing household chores

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October 12, 2016: Girls globally spend 160 million hours each day more than boys doing household chores like washing clothes, bringing firewood and cooking, Unicef said on Wednesday.

Citing its report ‘Harnessing the Power of Data for Girls: Taking stock and looking ahead to 2030’, published ahead of International Day of the Girl on October 11, a statement by the UN agency on Wednesday said that girls between 5 and 9 years old work 30 per cent more than boys in the same age bracket.

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This workload disparity rises up to 50 percent for them as they grow older. Girls between 10 and 14 years old spend twice as much time than boys, or 120 million hours more each day, doing household chores.

“The overburden of unpaid household work begins in early childhood and intensifies as girls reach adolescence,” said Unicef’s Principal Gender Advisor Anju Malhotra.

“As a result, girls sacrifice important opportunities to learn, grow, and just enjoy their childhood. This unequal distribution of labour among children also perpetuates gender stereotypes and the double burden on women and girls across generations,” she added.

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The report further categorises the chores by type. The task of cooking and cleaning the house tops as the underpaid work done at home by girls, with as high as 64 percent of them doing it.

The second most commonly performed task was shopping for the household (50 percent), followed by fetching water or firewood (46 per cent), caring for other children (43 percent), and other household tasks (31 per cent).

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It was also observed by the agency that two-third of the 44 indicators related to girls, marked under Sustainable Development Goals, were poorly maintained.

“Quantifying the challenges girls face is the first critical step towards meeting the Sustainable Development Goal on gender equality and breaking down barriers that confront the world’s 1.1 billion girls,” Unicef Chief of Data and Analytics Attila Hancioglu said in the statement. (IANS)

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UN: Rohingya Children Face Perpetual Life in Limbo

UNICEF says the nearly 700,000 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh will not return to their homes in Myanmar without guarantees of safety

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Rohingya Children
Tuberculosis causes lots of death every year. VOA

A generation of Rohingya children in Myanmar and Bangladesh will be condemned to a perpetual life in limbo unless coordinated international action is taken to end the violence and discrimination against the Rohingya people, according to the UNICEF report Lives in Limbo.

More than half a million Rohingya refugee children are estimated to have fled to Bangladesh. The report by the U.N. children’s fund says that these children face multiple dangers, including the imminent threat of floods, landslides, and waterborne disease outbreaks during the upcoming monsoon and cyclone seasons, as well as the exploitation and early marriages that arise from living in congested, slumlike conditions.

However, the situation for the estimated 185,000 children who remain in Myanmar’s Rakhine state is considered even grimmer, according to Simon Ingram, author of the report.

ALSO READ: Crisis of Rohingya: A future lost in darkness of time

Rohingya Children
A Rohingya Muslim child kisses his mother as they rest after having crossed over from Myanmar to the Bangladesh side of the border near Cox’s Bazar’s Teknaf area, Sept. 2, 2017. Tens of thousands of others crossed into Bangladesh in a 24-hour span as they fled violence in western Myanmar, the UNHCR said. VOA

He says families there reportedly are living isolated, fearful lives with minimal access to basic services.

“I think, if we are looking for an indicator of the situation on the ground, there is the fact that people are still continuing to come at the rate of something like 1,000 or more a week, crossing into Bangladesh,” Ingram said. “So, I think that that number itself speaks to the situation on the ground — the anxiety, the fear, the continued threat of violence and the hope of those people and those communities.”

UNICEF is urging the Myanmar government to end the violence, to lift restrictions on Rohingya freedom of movement in Rakhine state, to provide for their basic needs, and to grant unlimited access to humanitarian agencies.

UNICEF says the nearly 700,000 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh will not return to their homes in Myanmar without guarantees of safety. In the meantime, it says, education offers one of the best opportunities for Rohingya children to achieve a better future. (VOA)

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