Saturday December 16, 2017
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Go Home Indian Media – How we fail people in our never ending quest for TRPs

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Powerful earthquake hits Nepal

By Harshmeet Singh

All across the world May 3 is celebrated as the ‘World Press Freedom Day.’ On this day, people pay tribute to the journalists for their courage and commitment towards freedom of speech. But on Sunday, Nepal wasn’t a part of these celebrations. Instead, #GoHomeIndianMedia was the trending hashtag in the country with over 60,000 tweets.

Widely regarded as the ‘fourth pillar’ of the Indian democracy, the Indian media has been slammed for multiple reasons of late. And on all such occasions, Twitterati have been quick to jump on to the media and make their voices heard. Right from the media’s insensitive and sensational coverage of the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks and Times Now’s #ShamedinSydney campaign aimed at bashing the Indian cricket team to covering the Nepal tragedy as a ‘public relations exercise’ for the Indian Government, the Indian media has done little to enhance its reputation in the past few years.

Nepal has taken to the social media to bash the Indian media for their ‘insensitive and ‘dramatic’ coverage of the natural calamity, which has left over 7,000 dead in the Himalayan nation. Most notable of the criticisms came from one Sunita Shakya, a Nepali origin girl. She published a blog on CNN saying, “Your media and media personnel are acting like they are shooting some kind of family serials.”

Her observation further added, “Thanks to tons of reporters who came to Nepal from those rescue planes of India, you took a seat where a victim could be transported to hospitals/ health camps. Thanks to you all reporters, you took a seat where a bag of food and supplies could be placed to send to those hardly hit places.”

But this was perhaps not the first time that the Indian media has preferred to ask ‘How are you feeling?’ instead of helping a person in need. Questions such as ‘How many people of your family have died in the earthquake?’ were heard by the locals more than once. Some people in Nepal also accused the media of spreading lies and presenting a false picture in front of the world. The locals have accused the Indian media of being excessively self praiseworthy when others were doing just as much to help the needy.

Anything for the TRPs

Corporate takeover of the media has long been happening in India. News which ‘hooks’ the people to their TV screens, irrespective of its authenticity, dominates our news channels. Media’s obsession with presenting the ‘breaking news’ has often forced channels to cross the threshold of fundamentals of journalism.

Last year’s devastating floods in Kashmir saw thousands of people stranded at the rooftops and far off places where no help was available. Instead of carrying the essentials with them or helping the stranded people to reach safe corners, the media preferred pointing their cameras at them and asking them if they think the Government has done enough for them!

The concept of ‘investigative journalism’ has been brutally abused in India. Critical facts have been botched up and presented by the media in a number of high profile cases such as the Arushi Case and the Sunanda Pushkar case. Half-baked and Half-true facts have been put forward by the media in many cases, terming them as ‘Breaking news.’ Even before these matters reached the courts, a number of news channels were running stories such as ‘Why would Shashi Tharoor kill his wife,’ and ‘A dark truth regarding the past of Arushi’s parents.’ Such ‘prime time’ shows were aimed at gaining audience in big number and selling advertisements at a premium price. While the media may argue that they are only presenting an opinion, the fact that such opinions create a certain mood among the public can’t be ignored.

Over the past few years, the Indian media has been increasingly poaching into the turf of judiciary and investigating agencies. An endless search for breaking news has diluted the standards of the Indian media to a great deal and has given rise to multiple errors. In December 2011, Times Now was slapped a 100 crore fine after it had mistakenly shown the photograph of Justice P B Sawant, a former SC judge, in place of an accused in a multi crore Provident Fund case. Such goof-ups are now becoming increasingly common as the media crosses its limits in search of breaking news. In May this year, on the day of the counting of votes of the Lok Sabha elections, many news channels started showing poll results much before the official count even began, just to get the viewers attracted to them and not others!

Not all is lost  

To say that the Indian media is doomed would be going a bit too far. There have been multiple instances in the past when the media has mobilized the public on social issues. The public reactions to the Nirbhaya rape case and Anna Hazare’s Jan Lokpal agitation were extensively covered by the Indian media, thus shaking the dormant public and pushing them to ask for their rights. Many other such examples can be put forward. But somewhere down the line, the media has tilted the balance towards TRPs and ignored their basic duty of reporting what they see – without any extra added flavors.

In most arguments, the one with the last word has an upper hand. For years, the media sat in a unique position where no one could have argued with its reporting simply because you can’t speak back to the television or the newspaper! But with the advent of social media, the media channels have started to come under fire. They are now being held accountable for their actions. There is now a way to speak back to the television. The Indian media must realize this and mend its ways before people become oblivious to its presence.

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Facebook, Google, Bing and Twitter Join The Trust Project to Help Users Combat Fake News

In their bid to combat fake news and help readers identify trustworthy news sources, Facebook, Google, Twitter and several media organisations have joined the non-partisan "The Trust Project"

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To Combat Fake News
To Combat Fake News Facebook, Twitter , Google have joined 'The Trust Project'. PIxabay.

San Francisco, Nov 19: In their bid to combat fake news and help readers identify trustworthy news sources, Facebook, Google, Twitter and several media organisations have joined the non-partisan “The Trust Project”.

“The Trust Project” is led by award-winning journalist Sally Lehrman of Santa Clara University’s Markkula Centre for Applied Ethics.

Starting from Friday, an icon will appear next to articles in Facebook News Feed.

When you click on the icon, you can read information on the organisations’ ethics and other standards, the journalists’ backgrounds, and how they do their work.

“Leading media companies representing dozens of news sites have begun to display ‘Trust Indicators’. These indicators, created by leaders from more than 75 news organisations also show what type of information people are reading a” news, opinion, analysis or advertising,” the university said in a statement.

Each indicator is signalled in the article and site code, providing the first standardised technical language for platforms to learn more from news sites about the quality and expertise behind journalists’ work.

“Google, Facebook, Bing and Twitter have all agreed to use the indicators and are investigating and piloting ideas about how to best to use them to surface and display quality journalism,” the university said.

German press agency DPA, The Economist, The Globe and Mail, the Independent Journal Review, Mic, Italy’s La Republica and La Stampa, Trinity Mirror and The Washington Post are among the companies starting to go live with “Trust Indicators” this month.

The Institute for Non-profit News has developed a WordPress plug-in to facilitate broader implementation by qualified publishers.

“An increasingly sceptical public wants to know the expertise, enterprise and ethics behind a news story. The Trust Indicators put tools into people’s hands, giving them the means to assess whether news comes from a credible source they can depend on,” Lehrman explained.

The eight core indicators are: Best Practices; Author Expertise; Type of Work; Citations and References; Methods; Locally Sourced; Diverse Voices and Actionable Feedback.

New organisations like the BBC and Hearst Television have collaborated in defining the “Trust Indicator” editorial and technical standards, and in developing the processes for implementing these.

“Quality journalism has never been more important,” said Richard Gingras, vice president of news products at Google.

“We hope to use the Type of Work indicator to improve the accuracy of article labels in Google News, and indicators such as Best Practices and Author Info in our Knowledge Panels.”

“The Trust Indicators will provide a new level of accessibility and insight into the news that people on Facebook see day in and day out,” said Alex Hardiman, Head of News Products at Facebook.

A growing number of news outlets are expected to display the indicators over the next six months, with a second phase of news partners beginning implementation work soon. (IANS)

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Just in! No More Blue Tick to Verify your Account on Twitter

The announcement came after people criticised Twitter for verifying the account belonging to the organiser of the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left one dead in August

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blue tick
Twitter app on a mobile phone. Pixabay

San Francisco, November 10, 2017 : Twitter has suspended its account verification exercise – a process that gives public figures on the micro-blogging platform a blue tick mark next to their names.

The announcement came after people criticised Twitter for verifying the account belonging to the organiser of the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left one dead in August, TechCrunch reported on Friday.

“Verification was meant to authenticate identity and voice but it is interpreted as an endorsement or an indicator of importance.

“We recognise that we have created this confusion and need to resolve it. We have paused all general verifications while we work and will report back soon,” read a tweet from @TwitterSupport account.

Jason Kessler, the organiser of the supremacist rally, was given the preferred status indicated by the blue tick.

Twitter had earlier withheld blue tick mark for whistleblower Julian Assange.

“We should’ve communicated faster on this: our agents have been following our verification policy correctly, but we realised some time ago the system is broken and needs to be reconsidered.

“And we failed by not doing anything about it. Working now to fix faster,” tweeted CEO Jack Dorsey.

Launched in 2016, the micro-blogging website created an online application process for Twitter accounts to receive verified status, which allows people to identify key individuals and organisations on Twitter as authentic and are denoted by a blue tick icon.

This typically includes accounts maintained by public figures and organisations in music, TV, film, fashion, government, politics, religion, media, sports, business and other key interest areas. (IANS)

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Send Your own Nudes to Facebook to Stop Revenge Porn

Facebook is testing a new method to stop revenge porn that requires you to send your own nudes to yourself via the social network's Messenger app

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Send your own nudes
Send your own nudes via messenger app to yourself.Pixabay.

Sydney, Nov 9: Facebook is testing a new method to stop revenge porn that requires you to send your own nudes to yourself via the social network’s Messenger app.

This strategy would help Facebook to create a digital fingerprint for the picture and mark it as non-consensual explicit media.

So if a relationship goes sour, you could take proactive steps to prevent any intimate images in possession of your former love interest from being shared widely on Facebook or instagram.

Facebook is partnering with a Australian government agency to prevent such image-based abuses, the Australia Broadcasting Corp reported.

If you’re worried your intimate photos will end up on Instagram or Facebook, you can get in contact with Australi’s e-Safety Commissioner. They might then tell you to send your own nudes to yourself on Messenger.

send your own nudes to yourself
Facebook is coming up with a method to prevent revenge porn if you send your own nudes to yourself. Pixabay.

“It would be like sending yourself your image in email, but obviously this is a much safer, secure end-to-end way of sending the image without sending it through the ether,” e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant told ABC.

Once the image is sent via Messenger, Facebook would use technology to “hash” it, which means creating a digital fingerprint or link.

“They’re not storing the image, they’re storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies,” Grant said.

“So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded,” she explained.

Australia is one of four countries taking part in the “industry-first” pilot which uses “cutting-edge technology” to prevent the re-sharing on images on its platforms, Facebook’s Head of Global Safety Antigone Davis was quoted as saying.

“The safety and wellbeing of the Facebook community is our top priority,” Davis said. (IANS)