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Govt may restrict sale of antibiotics

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Dili (Timor Leste): The government may shortly issue restrictions on prescription and sale of commonly-used antibiotics in a bid to avoid development of drug resistance to infectious diseases like tuberculosis, malaria, urinary tract infection (UTI) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Photo credit: www.brainwaving.com
Photo credit: www.brainwaving.com

If this measure is implemented, doctors and chemists will have to follow certain mandatory protocols and guidelines when they prescribe antibiotics. Even chemists will have to maintain records of all kinds of antibiotics that they procure and sell along with the doctor’s prescription.

This is a move which has been implemented or is in the process of implementation, by all member countries of World Health Organisation (WHO) in a bid to fight drug-resistant diseases.

WHO will monitor the implementation of the strategy at its current South East Asia Regional Committee meeting in Timor Leste. However, India has a big lead of the May 2017 deadline set up at the World Health Assembly meeting of WHO in Geneva in May, officials said. According to the resolution passed at the Assembly, the countries need to frame plans by May 2017 and align them with WHO’s global strategy.

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Oral Antibiotics Possess Threat of Kidney Stones

For broad-spectrum penicillins, the increased risk was 27 per cent higher, the researchers added.

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Antibiotics can develop kidney stones, Pixabay

Children and adults treated with oral antibiotics may have a higher risk of developing kidney stones, according to a new study.

The findings, published in Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, suggested that the strongest risks appeared at younger ages and among patients most recently exposed to antibiotics.

“The overall prevalence of kidney stones has risen by 70 per cent over the past 30 years, with particularly sharp increases among adolescents and young women,” said lead author Gregory E. Tasian from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).

According to the researchers, kidney stones were previously rare in children.

“The reasons for the increase are unknown, but our findings suggest that oral antibiotics play a role, especially given that children are prescribed antibiotics at higher rates than adults,” said co-author Michelle Denburg from CHOP.

Children and adults treated with oral antibiotics may have a higher risk of developing kidney stones, according to a new study.
Antibiotics, Pixabay

For the study, the team analysed prior antibiotic exposure for nearly 26,000 patients with kidney stones, compared to nearly 260,000 control subjects.

They found that five classes of oral antibiotics — oral sulfas, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, nitrofurantoin, and broad-spectrum penicillins — were associated with a diagnosis of kidney stone disease.

After adjustments for age, sex, race, urinary tract infection, other medications and medical conditions, patients who received sulfa drugs were more than twice as likely as those not exposed to antibiotics to have kidney stones, the researchers said.

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For broad-spectrum penicillins, the increased risk was 27 per cent higher, the researchers added.

They also mentioned that the risk of kidney stones decreased over time but remained elevated several years after antibiotic use.

“Our findings suggest that antibiotic prescription practices represent a modifiable risk factor, a change in prescribing patterns might decrease the current epidemic of kidney stones in children,” Tasian noted. (IANS)

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