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‘Green corridors’ help rapid transport of organs

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Indore: Giving a fresh lease of life to three patients, two ‘green corridors’ on Tuesday helped in rapid transportation of organs taken from a brain-dead patient in an Indore hospital in Madhya Pradesh.

A resident of Mahidpur in Ujjain district, Vishwas Joshi, 40, was declared brain-dead in Choithram Hospital here on Monday evening.

After his kin expressed their wish to donate his organs, a liver patient in Delhi and two kidney patients in Indore were shortlisted for transplantation on the basis of their blood group.

On Tuesday morning, after the needed organs were harvested, two corridors — one from the hospital to Indore airport and another to a nursing home in Greater Kailash area of the city — were created for their transportation.

Traffic on both routes was disrupted for only eight minutes during the whole process.

Corneal lens harvested from Vishwas have been preserved at the Choithram Hospital for future transplantation. (IANS)(Photo: Youtube)

 

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Breast cells may behave menace by High Vitamin D

Higher levels of Vitamin D among women

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High vitamin D harming Breast Cancer, Pixabay

Higher levels of Vitamin D among women may reduce their risk of developing breast cancer post menopause, claimed a new study.

The study found that women with blood levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (OH) — the main form of vitamin D in blood — above 60 ng/ml (nanograms per millilitre) had one-fifth the risk of breast cancer compared to those with less than 20 ng/ml.

 Vitamin D levels in blood were measured during study visits.
Higher levels of Vitamin D among women may reduce their risk of developing breast cancer post menopause, pixabay

Thus, researchers from the University of California-San Diego determined that the minimum healthy level of 25(OH) in blood plasma should be 60 ng/ml, instead of the earlier recommended higher than the 20 ng/ml.

“Increasing Vitamin D blood levels substantially above 20 ng/ml appears to be important for the prevention of breast cancer,” said lead author Sharon McDonnell from GrassrootsHealth, a non-profit public health research organisation.

Also Read: British researchers discover a protein that can control spread of breast cancer in body

The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, analysed data from two randomised clinical trials with 3,325 combined women and a prospective study involving 1,713 women with average age of 63.

Participants were free of cancer at enrollment and were followed for a mean period of four years. Vitamin D levels in blood were measured during study visits.

“This study was limited to postmenopausal breast cancer. Further research is needed on whether high 25(OH)D levels might prevent premenopausal breast cancer,” said Cedric F. Garland from UC-San Diego. (IANS.)

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