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Haryana to set up Nutrition Commission

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Gurgaon: Haryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Tuesday said the state government has started the process to set up a “State Nutrition Commission” and formulate a “State Nutrition Policy” to address malnutrition among children.

The chief minister was speaking at an event organised for the ‘Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao” program here.

He said the aim of the State Nutrition Mission would be “healthy child, healthy teenager, healthy mother and healthy Haryana”.

Stressing that action would be taken under the mission according to guidelines of the Unicef and WHO, Khattar said it was sad that children were malnourished in Haryana, which is known as the land of milk and yogurt.

According to a survey, 40 per cent children of Haryana were underweight, 46 per cent children suffered from dwarfism and 19 per cent were underweight.

According to another survey conducted in 2013-14 by the National Institute of Nutrition in Hyderabad, 27.85 per cent children up to five years of age in Haryana were underweight, 34.1 per cent children suffered from dwarfism and 11 per cent children were underweight.

On the ‘Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao’ programme, he said: “We are seeking support of all sections of society — representatives of people, social workers, sociologists, intellectuals, distinguished personalities of the corporate sector.

“We are marching forward in a scientific manner. We are laying stress on care of the female fetus,” he said.

(IANS)

 

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Eat Less Saturated, Trans Fats to Curb Heart Disease: WHO

An active adult needs about 2,500 calories per day, Branca said

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The World Health Organization said Friday that adults and children should limit their intake of saturated fat — found in foods such a meat — and trans fat — found in foods such as french fries.
The World Health Organization said Friday that adults and children should limit their intake of saturated fat — found in foods such a meat — and trans fat — found in foods such as french fries. The World Health Organization said Friday that adults and children should limit their intake of saturated fat — found in foods such a meat — and trans fat — found in foods such as french fries. VOA

Adults and children should consume a maximum of 10 percent of their daily calories in the form of saturated fat such as meat and butter and one percent from trans fats to reduce the risk of heart disease, the World Health Organization said Friday.

The draft recommendations, the first since 2002, are aimed at reducing non-communicable diseases, led by cardiovascular diseases, blamed for 72 percent of the 54.7 million estimated deaths worldwide every year, many before the age of 70.

“Dietary saturated fatty acids and trans-fatty acids are of particular concern because high levels of intake are correlated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases,” Dr. Francesco Branca, Director of WHO’s Department of Nutrition for Health and Development, told reporters.

The dietary recommendations are based on scientific evidence developed in the last 15 years, he added.

The United Nations agency has invited public comments until June 1 on the recommendations, which it expects to finalize by year-end.

Junk food.
Junk food. Pixabay

Saturated fat is found in foods from animal sources such as butter, cow’s milk, meat, salmon and egg yolks, and in some plant-derived products such as chocolate, cocoa butter, coconut, palm and palm kernel oils.

An active adult needs about 2,500 calories per day, Branca said.

“So we are talking about 250 calories coming from saturated fat and that is approximately a bit less than 30 grams of saturated fat,” he said.

That amount of fat could be found in 50 grams (1.76 oz) of butter, 130-150 grams of cheese with 30 percent fat, a liter of full fat milk, or 50 grams of palm oil, he said.

Trans fats

Trans fats occur naturally in meat and dairy products. But the predominant source is industrially-produced and contained in baked and fried foods such as fries and doughnuts, snacks, and partially hydrogenated cooking oils and fats often used by restaurants and street vendors.

In explicit new advice, WHO said that excessive amounts of saturated fat and trans fat should be replaced by polyunsaturated fats, such as fish, canola and olive oils.

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“Reduced intake of saturated fatty acids have been associated with a significant reduction in risk of coronary heart disease when replaced with polyunsaturated fatty acids or carbohydrates from whole grains,” it said.

Total fat consumption should not exceed 30 percent of total energy intake to avoid unhealthy weight gain, it added.

The recommendations complement other WHO guidelines including limiting intake of free sugars and sodium. (VOA)

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