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Hindi is common property, no party can appropriate it: Mrinal Pande

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New Delhi: The recently-concluded World Hindi Conference in Bhopal was conducted by people with “obvious party affiliations” which left out noted Hindi writers, Hindi media persons and students, says a veteran journalist and noted writer.

Mrinal Pande, who chaired one of the sessions at the event, feels the Narendra Modi-led NDA government had “erred in not inviting Hindi writers who could have contributed much” to the conference. The conference was aimed at “shuddhikaran” (cleansing) of the Hindi language.

“Language is a common property and a party cannot take a broom and sweep it clean. The writers and the specialists operating on the ground — the media and students of media — were kept out by the organisers, she said.

Mrinal Pande
Mrinal Pande

“The whole thing was handled by people with obvious party affiliations, whose writ was ‘Hindi ka shuddhikaran‘. What shuddhikaran will you do? If you do shuddhikaran, nothing will be left (of the language),” Pande told IANS in an interview over the phone.

The former head of Prasar Bharati said the notion of cleansing the language was “absurd”.

She said most of the Hindi “as we know and speak it today is based largely on dialects like Awadhi, Bhojpuri, Brij Bhasha and Haryanvi. Only 20 percent is based on pure Sanskrit.”

The rest, she added, was based on Persian, Portuguese, Arabic, English and other languages that came in with various traders and armies over the centuries.

Pande said that if the government was serious about promoting Hindi and helping its cause, it should stress on creating proper hardware and software that are compatible with the various kinds of spoken Hindi, taking into account the phonetics and nuances of the language as spoken in different regions.

Pande says a single word in Hindi is pronounced differently in different regions of the Hindi-speaking areas, and the government should work towards developing search engines for Hindi users, keeping all the regional variants in mind.

“The linguistic problems, the word sense, disambiguation and phonetics — all this can’t be done by RSS pracharaks who are not academicians. They were there boasting that Hindi is our matribhasha… I have spent a whole lifetime and burnt the candle at both ends to try and do my bit to professionalise the language,” said Pande.

“At the sammelan, most of the emphasis was on selling Hindi as a source of India’s pride, and on sanitising Hindi – playing it off against English, and also monetising the large numbers of Hindi users in the global market,” she added.

As the editor of Hindi daily Hindustan which would bring out 17 editions and many sub-editions, including those in Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana and western UP, she found that readers of different regions protested whenever they felt imposed by the central office to use a kind of Hindi they did not speak.

On the proposed two counts of looking at Hindi language– as a tool for mass communication and on developing requisite software, Pande said, “They seemed wishy-washy and watered down and dominated by verbiage”.

According to Pande, at the 9th World Hindi Conference in 2012 in Johannesburg, held under the UPA dispensation, a resolution was passed that the government should work towards total standardisation of Hindi and development of dual keyboards, making it mandatory for all computer companies to make such keyboards. It was also decided that the World Wide Web should be made friendly to Hindi.

indianexpress.com
indianexpress.com

She said her friends who had attended the Johannesburg event told her that the proposal had been sent to the government of India. “Nobody knows what happened to the proposal,” she added.

She also felt that the Narendra Modi government was laying out the red carpet for foreign IT companies, but it was not clear if it had been ensured that they would do enough to help Hindi and the other regional languages or acquire the same kind of user friendly hardware and software that English and other European languages enjoyed.

She said Modi, who is going to Silicon Valley later this month, should talk “seriously and knowledgeably” to the foreign IT firms about all this.

“This is a serious professional matter, not an emotional one, and for thousands like me who are living and working in Hindi, we need professional tools, we don’t need the use of Hindi to be made into an emotive issue.”

(Ranjana Narayan, IANS)

1 COMMENT

  1. It is hypocritical to shed crocodile tears for Hindi and its “Shuddhikaran” when its status of “National Language” is clearly become meaningless since it is not a language that allows its speaker to earn a decent living. Hindiwallahs are culturally conditioned to look down upon Hindi as a language of the menials and it is disbanded from circles of – to use the expression of Anna Hazare – KALA ANGREZ who controls higher technical education, judiciary, corporate circles, competitive examinations etc. Make it a language of livelihood then talk about “SHUDDHIKARAN” . Another point to remember is to counter the organized cultural conditioning of the masses by mainstream media, Bollywood, and Anglophonic schools – to glorify the language of KALAANGREZ and lookdown upon everything indigenous. Hindiwallahs – on one hand treats their own language and culture with contempt and on the other hand shows open contempt for other regional languages and slavish attitude towards ANGREZI. Instead of passing judgment let me just add- that it is interesting how marketing tricks have culturally conditioned the so called educated class of India from all over the land to have lost all sense of self-respect and dignity and play the role of poodle of their Anglo-American masters.

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Hindi Literature Festival in Delhi all set to give essence of pleasures through artistic culture of Language

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Books, Pixabay

New Delhi, March 18, 2017: A festival celebrating Hindi literature is all set to give youthful groups of onlookers an essence of the many pleasures contained inside the artistic culture of the language.

The festival titled, “Oxford Bookstore Hindi Sahitya Utsav” will be held at Oxford Bookstore here on March 19.

This event will serve as a platform for the people who are looking forward to explore this language through various discussions and intellectual sessions with the experts of hindi language.

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The day-long festival of Hindi writings and Hindi verses will be composed collaboratively with Rajkamal Prakashan samuh and upheld by Vani Prakashan, Hindi Yugum Prakashan, Westland Books, Rajpal and sons, Virtuous publications, and Kunwar Viyogi Remembrance trust.

According to the organisers, Hindi is a very expressive language. “In poetry and songs, it can convey emotions using simple and gentle words. It can also be used for exact and rational reasoning,” they said.

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“The occasion has been conceptualized as a tester’s menu, a sampler, a buffet of the many flavors contained in hindi language & writings, voices, subjects, tones and themes in Hindi,” they added.

The festival will start with an introductory note by Mrinaal Pandey on the topic “Bhasha aur samaj”. That will be followed by interactive sessions by Manisha pandey, Piyush Mishra, Divya Prakash Dubey, Urvashi Butalia many more literary personalities associated with Hindi literature.

It has been divided into sessions comprising readings and recitations on themes as diverse as wit, humour and satire, dissent, modernism, etc. (IANS)

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Journey of Hindi from Dialect “boli’ to Official-National Language ‘rashtrabhasha’

It is officially the country’s first language that is spoken and understood, among all the other Indian languages

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August 27, 2016:

“Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.”
– Samuel Taylor Coleridge

A Language has a paramount importance just not in the terms of exchanging words, but also in terms of sharing  feelings, expressions and beliefs – in the form of words, signs, symbols or sound. It is an important source and means of human communication. But with time, gradual change and development of languages, have become more apparent.

Evolution of any language depends mainly on socialization and interaction. Most interactive languages have evolved rapidly, rather than any isolated language of any particular tribe, that resides distinctly far away, based on the geographical biases. Languages which lack in socialization and interaction, also lack in adapting values and behaviors from other culture as well.

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India is a multi-lingual country, and officially it has 22 languages and Hindi being one of them. It is officially the country’s first language that is spoken and understood by the majority of Indians.

  • Origin of Hindi Language: According to Griysen, Hindi is divided into two- Paschimi Hindi – Shourseni Apbransh and Purvi Hindi – Ardhmagdhi Apbransh. The root of Shourseni Apbhransh is Sanskrit, which came from Aryan language. Shourseni Apbhransh has developed into Khadi Boli, and later to Hindi.

Hindi, being the most interactive and socialized language is coupled with the influence of technology, lifestyle and other languages and culture, is no less far in terms of evolving.

Image source: YouTube
Image source: YouTube

Evolution of Hindi has occurred in numerous forms:

  • Change in writing and speaking: Hindi is written in Devnagri script originated from ‘Bahamani Lipi’, though later in 1935, few corrections in changing of letter’s shapes and use of the verbs took place in “Nagri Lipi Sudhar Samiti” by Kaka Kalelkar. Moreover, nowadays people are more prone to using ‘Bol Ki Bhasha’ or spoken word, rather than, ‘Manak’ or standard Hindi.

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  • Insertion of New Words: Over time, Hindi has been influenced by foreign languages- like Urdu, English, Persian Sanskrit, Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Portuguese, Dravidian Languages and others. Hindi is full of loan words and one will be surprised to know that most of the words that we use in our daily conversation have a foreign origin. Therefore number of words like – Tadbhava (तद्भव/تَدبهَو derived from Sanskrit or Prakrit), Tatsama (तत्सम/تَتسَم identical, derived from Sanskrit), Deshaja (देशज/دیشَج local, derived from Sanskrit).
  • Influence of media: Hindi has got worldwide fame for the influence of media. Social media, film, and television have influenced the writing style of Hindi a lot! People who don’t know how to read or write Hindi to express his feelings in the form of Devnagri script can easily do the same in Roman script. Be it ‘sharyari’ or a film script; use of Roman script in Hindi in nothing new.
  • Popular songs and Advertisements: Exposure of Hindi through songs or adds helps the language to reach out to several people. Nowadays, to make songs appealing and catchy, lyricists and script writers prefer a combination of both Hindi and English and other languages. Due to this, directly or indirectly one comes across the language or gets aware of it. Thus, we can have an idea, how Hindi has evolved with the evolution of time.

– by Riashe Chakraborty from NewsGram. Twitter: @itzriashe

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5 responses to “Journey of Hindi from Dialect “boli’ to Official-National Language ‘rashtrabhasha’”

  1. Even though Hindi has a rich history in India, regional languages are still preferred in their respective region, like, Tamil in Tamil Nadu, Telugu in Andhra Pradesh, Bhojpuri in Bihar and they dominate with greater numbers.

  2. Hindi has no historic connection to India. It was brought by Islamic marauders and promoted by the British. Its the least Indian language. The government is hell bent on the complete elimination of Indian languages out of India and replacing them all with the Pakistani Islamic origin language Hindi. This is also the very reason why radical Islamic party BJP rejected the Indian language petition.

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Debate over Tibet’s freedom lands Young Tibetans in dilemma

Parents in Dharamsala worry that their Hindi-speaking children are too Indian, while new arrivals from Tibet to Dharamsala struggle to fit in

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Dalai Lama. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
– by Ranjuaery Dhadwal 

August 24, 2016:
If Tibet gets independence today, will the new English speaking generation prefer to go to their own country? The question that haunts the older generation.
Especially the generation which came to India with or after Dalai Lama. The generation, which was born in Tibet and fled to India or other parts of the world are worried that the  Tibetan language is only left in few phrases in younger generation’s memory. Now the trend is that more and more Tibetans want their children to remain in India because it has more cultural proximity with Tibet.
Indian Government has opened up Central schools in almost all the Tibetan settlements in India, where Tibetan Language is taught. It’s been more than 60 years since the first wave of Tibetans fled Dharamsala in Himachal Pradesh following a failed uprising against Chinese Communist Party rule and the subsequent brutal military crackdown.

Representational Image: Tibetan Teachings Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Representational Image: Tibetan Teachings. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Roughly 85,000 people who first fled Tibet mainly clustered around a central core, built around Dharamsala and the Dalai Lama; in the mountains of India, Nepal, and Bhutan- next to their homeland. Now after three decades, new chapter for Tibetans living outside has emerged. As the prospects of returning to Tibet is diminishing, more and more Tibetans are adopting refugee life in South Asia for the West. Tibetan Government in Exile’s lobbying has arranged for large-scale resettlement programs that bring in hundreds of immigrants every day.

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Dalai Lama says that intermarriage for Tibetans was inevitable but Tibetan language and culture is important and needs to be preserved. Some of them have married Western and Indian women and are having half-Tibetan children. Most of the young Tibetan women too prefer to marry western or Indian people for a settled life.

In an interview Dalai Lama said that had he adopted the path of violence for Tibet’s independence, the Tibetan race would have extinct, rather he is approaching the middle way path for Tibet. Within the community, Tibetan Youth Congress is demanding total independence from China.

The present scenario is that Children born in India or in west are not aware of their culture or traditions. They are basically Americanized or Indianized. Most of them are into higher studies instead of joining the freedom struggle. One of the youngsters in Dharmashala has got his MBA from the University of Oregon, in entrepreneurship. He will decide whether or not to go back to Tibet once it gets independence. At present, he wants to start his own venture. He said, even if they go back to Tibet, they have to start from scratch. Though they show their love for Tibet but there is a disconnect between knowing what you are and actively feeling that way.

Mixed-race Tibetans that came or are coming to India or going to other parts of the world are grappling with issues that how they will fit into the Tibetan cause- how to preserve a sense of connection to a far-flung homeland and how to handle the perception that they are contributing to the community that still feels like it must fight to preserve itself. There is clearly an existencial crisis among these people. They are living in a era when a community, which was recognized for its cultural preservation (even though Beijing has destroyed many of the hallmarks of its culture) these people are struggling to know what exactly constitutes authentic Tibetan-ness.

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Parents in Dharamsala worry that their Hindi-speaking children are too Indian, while new arrivals from Tibet to Dharamsala struggle to fit in. Most of them only say that they have come to learn English. Some of mixed-race Tibetans has struggled to find their footing as well.

Tibetan welfare officer says, Young Tibetans would grow too concerned with money and they would give up on the goal of e returning to the Tibet. The Tibetan government continues to lobby Western governments to take in more of those currently living in South Asian settlements. Tashi  Phuntsok, says that he has been urging Tibetan families to keep up the language with their children and make sure they remember where they came from.

Ex Tibetan Youth Congress President Tseten Norbu says, that it should be the main object of the Youth Congress. This is the only organization which has proximity with young Tibetans. He further mentions that, since the Himchal Government has given voting rights to the Tibetans born here or are half Tibetan, hope of returning to Tibet of this generation is diminishing.

– Ranjuaery is a freelance contributer and can be contacted at ranjuaery@gmail.com

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