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If we want to save some money, let’s just get rid of the court: Bobby Jindal

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Jindal

Washington: Finding himself at odds with the US Supreme Court over its two landmark judgements upholding healthcare law and same-sex marriage, Louisiana’s Indian-American governor, Bobby Jindal, wants to get rid of the court.

“Thursday, the Supreme Court had its say on Obamacare; soon, the American people will have theirs,” wrote the newly minted aspirant for Republican nomination for President, in an opinion piece in Time magazine.

Commenting on the Court’s decision upholding subsidies for states participating in the federally run insurance exchange, he wrote, “violates the plain text of Obamacare,” as President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law, “Affordable Care Act”, is nicknamed.

“It’s a sad outcome for the rule of law – and the English language,” said Jindal, who, like other Republican governors, has refused to set up a marketplace or exchange where people can shop for affordable health insurance.

But an estimated 138,000 residents of Louisiana are getting federal subsidies through the federal exchange that is open to those who don’t have access to state exchanges.

“Contrary to this President’s self-proclaimed edicts, yesterday’s Supreme Court decision is not the end of the debate on Obamacare,” said Jindal.

It merely “shifts back to the elected branches of government – the ones that caused our health care mess in the first place,” he said. “It is there, that conservatives can complete our work to repeal Obamacare.”

Jindal’s reaction to the apex court’s ruling legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide, was even more sharp.America Celebrates Gay Marriage

“The Supreme Court is completely out of control, making laws on their own, and has become a public opinion poll instead of a judicial body,” he said in a statement from Iowa, which holds the first presidential caucus.

“If we want to save some money, let’s just get rid of the court,” Jindal added.

Jindal later said that the ruling fundamentally redefined the institution of marriage.

“Marriage between a man and a woman was established by God, and no earthly court can alter that,” he added.

He also argued that protecting same-sex marriage would open the door to discrimination against people of faith who oppose its practice.
Despite the Supreme Court judgment, the Jindal administration has said Louisiana’s state government won’t recognize gay marriage for now.

But Mike Reed, Jindal’s spokesman in the governor’s office, acknowledged “Our agencies will have no choice but to comply with the Supreme Court’s decision” eventually, he told a media website. (IANS)

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Trump Travel Ban can stay despite ongoing legal battle: SC

Supreme court sighting national security allowed President Trump's travel ban despite ongoing legal battles

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Trump Travel Ban
Protestors against Trump Travel Ban (ALT)

The US Supreme Court on Monday decided to allow President Donald Trump’s latest travel ban to stay in force despite the ongoing legal case in lower courts, much to the joy of the Trump administration.

Of the members of the jury, seven ruled in favor of the administration while two — Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor — voted for the partial stay on the ban to continue.

The court did not account for its decision. The third travel ban issued by Trump denies American visas to most travelers from eight countries — Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela, and Yemen. Six of these are Muslim-majority nations.

Lower court judges in Maryland and Hawaii had barred the implementation of the ban.

The court’s decision essentially throws out a compromise that exempted foreign nationals who have credible claims of a bona fide relationship with someone in the United States. That includes grandparents, brothers- and sisters-in- law, aunts, uncles and cousins.

Lawyers for the state of Hawaii argued that the Supreme Court had no reason to enter the case at this stage because the Court had already acknowledged that some travelers from the eight countries can be safely vetted and get visas.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions termed Monday’s ruling as a “substantial victory for the safety and security of the American people”; before adding that Trump’s travel ban is necessary to protect the country from threats.

A lawyer for the Trump administration argued that some foreign governments are deficient in sharing information about those seeking U.S. visas, posing a possible risk to the U.S.

White House Deputy Press Spokesman Hogan Gidley found no element of surprise in Monday’s Supreme Court decision, suggesting that it is “essential to protecting our homeland”.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, however, again labelled the travel ban as a Muslim ban.

“The Supreme Court’s actions today are a good reminder that we can’t simply rely on the courts to address the Trump administration’s efforts to marginalize Muslims and other minorities”, CAIR attorney Gadeir Abbas said.

The Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments for and against the Trump travel ban as soon as the issue has made its way through the lower courts. (VOA)

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56 Percent Disapprove of Republican health care plan to replace the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare: Poll

One out of every seven Americans -- 14 per cent -- believes they will lose their health insurance under the Republicans' replacement plan

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Presidential encyclopedias
US President Donald Trump, VOA

Washington, March 24, 2017: A majority of American voters, 56 percent, disapprove of the Republican health care plan to replace the Affordable Care Act or Obamacare, according to a poll.

Only 17 percent of voters approve of the plan and 26 percent remain undecided, the Quinnipiac University poll revealed on Thursday.

The question — “There is a Republican health care plan to replace Obamacare, known as the American Health Care Act. Do you approve or disapprove of this Republican health care plan?” — did not go into specifics of the plan.

“Replacing Obamacare will come with a price for elected representatives who vote to scrap it, say many Americans, who clearly feel their health is in peril under the Republican alternative,” CNN quoted Tim Malloy, assistant director of the poll, as saying.

Most voters, 61 percent, also disapprove of the way President Donald Trump is handling health care.

The President and Republican leaders are scrambling for a deal on landmark legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans cannot lose more than 21 members of their party and still pass the bill, since no Democrats are expected to support it.

One out of every seven Americans — 14 per cent — believes they will lose their health insurance under the Republicans’ replacement plan.

The plan itself does not enjoy majority support among Republicans, with only 41 per cent backing the bill, reports CNN.

Most men, 56 per cent, disapprove of the plan as do most women, also 56 per cent.

While more than half of white voters disapprove of the plan, even more non-white voters — 64 per cent — disapprove.

Overall, 58 per cent of independent voters disapprove of the replacement plan.

Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,056 voters nationwide from March 16 to 21.

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Indian origin Srinivasan did not make it to US Supreme Court; people of his native village still ‘proud’ of him

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Photo: http://www.politico.com/

MUMBIA, India — The prayers of a southern Indian village went unanswered Wednesday morning when President Barack Obama named Merrick Garland as his next Supreme Court nominee. Distant relatives and well-wishers of Sri Srinivasan, believed to be a likely pick for the nomination, had been holding services in his honor in the riverside hamlet of Mela…