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IITian funda: Quit jobs and ‘start-up’

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New Delhi: IITians Prasoon Gupta, Manish Goyal, Badal Goel and Anil Nagar have one common trait besides graduating from the premiere institute. They resigned from their lucrative jobs to start a business on their own. Their endeavor proves that India is gradually graduating into a ‘start-up nation’.

IIT Roorkee alumni Prasoon Gupta filed his resignation in February 2014, and launched a quick service restaurant, Sattviko. The venture which is influenced by sattvik and yoga philosophy became a runaway success.

In no time, Sattviko outlets developed a staggering customer base who immediately became an avid fan of the food and beverages of the eatery.

“Our customers love and support also helped us win the ‘Best Debutant Restaurant Chain’ Award in December 2014”, said Gupta.

FRSH has enthralled its customers by providing doorstep services. It caught the fantasies of people by serving freshly sandwiches prepared salads and sandwiches. The founder, Badal Goel, another IITian ,  targeted those who wanted a break from the junk foods.

Founded in 2014 in Gurgaon, FRSH spread its wings at various locations across Delhi and Noida. One of the major customer bases of the company is corporate offices in Gurgaon. FRSH is also considering to initiate services in metro stations, apartment clusters and schools.

In November 2013, another IIT Bombay graduate Manish Goyal quit his high profile job to start Foodies Compass.

“As a backpacker and traveller, there was always this problem of what to order due to lack of visual and credible sources. So, we introduced this website and app where people can see visuals of food before they order,” said Goyal.

Foodies Compass, provides menus with pictures of food of more than 150 restaurants in Gurgaon, Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore, Kolkata, Chennai, Hyderabad and Ahmedabad. In very quick time it became one of the most visited food-based websites of India.

Yet another graduate from an IIT (IIT BHU), Anil Nagar, left his job at Cognizant Technology Solutions to set up his dream project Career Power in April 2010.

Career Power has become a reputed institution that imparts training to students for cracking entrance exams for getting jobs in the banking and service sector. Reportedly, around 85,000 aspirants have managed to get a job by studying in Career Power. He also launched a website in April 2012, bankersadda.com. The website is considered to be one of the most dependable websites among job aspirants.

With an increasing number of youngsters starting their own ventures, an overall development of India is inevitable as this would generate a lot of job opportunities besides strengthening the economy of the country.

 

(Picture Courtesy: www.zanebenefits.com)

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Yoga Face-toning May Compete With Fillers, Face-lifts

"The jury is still out on whether or not facial yoga is effective in reversing the signs of aging," he said in an email.

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Yoga face toning is an effective way of reducing the signs of ageing. VOA
  • Yoga face toning may take over botox and face lifting procedures.
  • 27 participants noted changes in their faces after weeks of this experiment.
  • It is still a matter of discussion if this method can reverse ageing or not.

In his toolbox of Botox, fillers and plastic surgery, cosmetic dermatologist Dr Murad Alam has added a new, low-cost, noninvasive anti-ageing treatment: facial yoga.

Dermatologists measured improvements in the appearance of the faces of a small group of middle-aged women after they did half an hour of daily face-toning exercises for eight weeks, followed by alternate-day exercises for another 12 weeks.

Facial exercises are healthier than surgeries. Pixabay
Facial exercises are healthier than surgeries. Pixabay

The results surprised lead author Alam, vice chair and professor of dermatology at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

“In fact, the results were stronger than I expected,” he said in a phone interview. “It’s really a win-win for patients.”

Participants included 27 women between 40 and 65, though only 16 completed the full course. It began with two 90-minute muscle-resistant facial exercise-training sessions led by co-author Gary Sikorski of Happy Face Yoga in Providence, Rhode Island.

Participants learned to perform cheek pushups and eye-bag removers, among other exercises. Then they practised at home.

Improvements noted

Dermatologists looking at unmarked before-and-after photos saw improvements in upper cheek and lower cheek fullness, and they estimated the average age of women who stuck with the program as significantly younger at the end than at the start.

Face yoga is a healthier substitute to surgical procedures. Pixabay
Face yoga is a healthier substitute for surgical procedures. Pixabay

The average estimated age dropped almost three years, from nearly 51 years to 48 years.

Participants also rated themselves as more satisfied with the appearance of their faces at the study’s end, Alam and colleagues reported in JAMA Dermatology.

“Now there is some evidence that facial exercises may improve facial appearance and reduce some visible signs of ageing,” Alam said. “Assuming the findings are confirmed in a larger study, individuals now have a low-cost, non-toxic way of looking younger or augmenting other cosmetic or anti-ageing treatments they may be seeking.”

The exercises enlarge and strengthen facial muscles to firm and tone the face, giving it a younger appearance, he said.

Happy Face sells instructional worksheets — promising smoother skin, firmed cheeks and raised eyelids — for $19.95. DVDs cost $24.95.

Some skepticism

But not all dermatologists are rushing to promote the videos or the exercises.

Dr John Chi, a plastic surgeon and professor at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, said the study raises more questions than it answers.

“The jury is still out on whether or not facial yoga is effective in reversing the signs of ageing,” he said in an email.

Chi, who was not involved with the study, said he would recommend facial yoga to patients who found it relaxing and enjoyable but not for the purpose of facial rejuvenation.

“While the premise of facial exercises to improve the facial appearance or reverse signs of ageing is an appealing one, there is little evidence to suggest that there is any benefit in this regard,” he said.

Chi said facial yoga had not been rigorously examined in peer-reviewed scientific studies. Asked whether procedures such as face-lifts, Botox and fillers had been rigorously examined in peer-reviewed studies, he replied: “Great question. Attempts to do so have been made in the scientific literature with variable levels of scientific rigour.”

Alam agrees that his study raises additional research questions, such as whether the exercises would work for men and how much time people need to commit to doing the exercises for them to be optimally effective. He would like to see a larger study. VOA