Saturday June 23, 2018

India among 14 nations to train students on climate change

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Washington: The White House today informed that India, France, China and Britain are among 14 countries who will train students on climate change and its impacts on health.

From these 14 countries, 48 medical, public health and nursing schools committed to give training to their students. This put the total number of schools in the world teaching climate change to 118, said the White House.

In India, two centers of Indian Institute of Public Health, including one in Bhubaneshwar, have taken up this objective.

The White House will make an official announcement in this regard on the sidelines of the ongoing Paris Climate Summit.

The present decision to train students on climate change is an expansion of a previous initiative towards this end. The White House said that US President Barrack Obama is committed to this global challenge, which needs a global response.

The 14 additional countries joining the move are Australia, Canada, China, Grenada, Ecuador, Finland, France, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland and United Kingdom.

A Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education will be formed to implement the working of the Health Educators Climate Commitment, as would soon be announced by the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, which is helping in recruiting peer institutions.

The Consortium will also act as a forum, through which, schools around the world dealing with health and medicine would be able to share scientific and educational knowledge and practices; develop a curriculum and core knowledge set; and work on ways to develop academic partnerships on a global platform to support professional health training, especially in countries which are under-resourced, said the White House.

Climate change cannot be ignored anymore as a concern for the future generation, and all nations must work together towards this issue as none are immune to its effects. This is what the Paris talks on climate change are all about, it asserted.

“Today’s commitments reinforce not only how vast the impacts of climate change are, but also the opportunity to join together and address this problem,” it said.

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Women Are Rarely “Put Front And Center” At The Heart Of Climate Action

Feminism doesn't mean excluding men

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Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017.
Former President of Ireland and former High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson speaks during a meeting at Associated Press headquarters, in New York, May 8, 2017. VOA

Women must be at the heart of climate action if the world is to limit the deadly impact of disasters such as floods, former Irish president and U.N. rights commissioner Mary Robinson said on Monday.

Robinson, also a former U.N. climate envoy, said women were most adversely affected by disasters and yet are rarely “put front and center” of efforts to protect the most vulnerable.

“Climate change is a man-made problem and must have a feminist solution,” she said at a meeting of climate experts at London’s Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and Entrepreneurship.

“Feminism doesn’t mean excluding men, it’s about being more inclusive of women and – in this case – acknowledging the role they can play in tackling climate change.”

Research has shown that women’s vulnerabilities are exposed during the chaos of cyclones, earthquakes and floods, according to the British think-tank Overseas Development Institute.

In many developing countries, for example, women are involved in food production, but are not allowed to manage the cash earned by selling their crops, said Robinson.

Earth depletion
Earth depletion, Pixabay

The lack of access to financial resources can hamper their ability to cope with extreme weather, she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on the sidelines of the event.

“Women all over the world are … on the front lines of the fall-out from climate change and therefore on the forefront of climate action,” said Natalie Samarasinghe, executive director of Britain’s United Nations Association.

“What we — the international community — need to do is talk to them, learn from them and support them in scaling up what they know works best in their communities,” she said at the meeting.

Also read: Climate change can have an effect on the taste of the wines

Robinson served as Irish president from 1990-1997 before taking over as the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, and now leads a foundation devoted to climate justice. (VOA)