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India calls for global convention on Cyber security

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New Delhi: India called for a truly global convention to fight cyber crime and to ensure cyber security.

India’s Electronics and Information Technology Secretary JS Deepak told a high-level meeting of the UN General Assembly on Tuesday that various stakeholders have to be involved to face the challenges of cyber security.

Emphasising the role of “governments, which bear ultimate responsibility for essential services and for public safety”, he said there was a need to “create a global convention to address issues of cybersecurity and cybercrime”.

He said that many of the cyber security challenges were “not well understood, much less addressed” and that a “multi-stakeholder approach” across geographies and societies was required to remedy this.

The General Assembly was holding a high-level review of developments in the decade since the Tunis 2005 World Summit on Information Society (WSIS+10).

Because the next billion Internet users will come from the developing countries, policies to enable access to the internet should be formulated with full involvement of those nations, Deepak said. Of them, 500 million would be from India, he added.

While a European-initiated convention against cybercrime came into being in 2001 and has been signed by 50 countries, India has stayed away because it and most other non-Western countries were excluded.

India has not been spared cyber attacks. For example, a Silicon Valley cybersecurity company, FireEye reported in April that for over a decade a cyber operation with likely ties to China spied on Indian defence, business and media operations.

Deepak spoke of “the huge digital opportunity that lies before us, from health and education to agriculture and disaster management, from human resource development to financial inclusion and reiterated India’s commitment to sharing its expertise in information technology to help other countries. As examples of New Delhi’s efforts, he cited the Pan-African e-Network Project was undertaken by India to connect 53 nations and India using fiber-optic and satellite networks for e-education and telemedicine and the Central Asian telemedicine project.”

Extolling India’s digital prowess, Deepak said its start-up sector is the third largest start-up ecosystem in the world. “Four new technology start-ups are coming up every day and because of their speed, agility and low costs these are fast becoming preferred models of global research and development in ICT (information and communication technology)” he said.(IANS)

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Actress Urvashi Rautela’s Twitter account hacked

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Urvashi Rautela
Urvashi Rautela's Twitter account hacked

Mumbai, october31’2017: Model-actress Urvashi Rautela says her Twitter account was hacked and misused.

“I love being so popular and a b***h,” read a post on Urvashi’s account on the micro-blogging site on Tuesday.

Urvashi later clarified through a tweet that the post was not made with her consent.

“My Twitter has been seriously hacked and we are looking for the perpetrators,” Urvashi tweeted to her over three lakh fans.

In another post, she wrote: “My Twitter handle hacked and will be restored shortly. If you see anything ambiguous, please know it’s not me.”

On the film front, Urvashi will next be seen in “Hate Story 4”, to release on March 2 next year.(IANS)

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Pakistani Man arrested for selling Child Pornography Online, confessed he lured 25 Children into it

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Children Playing in School, (representational image)Wikimedia

Islamabad, April 13, 2017: A Pakistani man arrested for selling child pornography online has confessed that he lured some 25 children into the heinous act on the pretext of imparting them computer education, the media reported on Thursday.

The Federal Investigation Agency’s (FIA) cyber crime wing on Tuesday arrested Saadat Amin, 45, from Sargodha in Punjab province and seized his computer and laptop, reports Dawn online.

FIA cyber crime head Deputy Director Shahid Hasan said the scam is “first of its kind” in Pakistan.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

“During interrogation Amin revealed that he had been selling child pornographic content online for the last few years. Amin used to lure children on the pretext of imparting computer education. He even paid between 3,000 and 5,000 Pakistani rupees to the parents of the victims, saying that their children would learn computer hardware and software (skills) at his one-room rented workshop in Sargodha,” an FIA official told Dawn.

The FIA cyber crime wing launched a probe into the matter on being informed by Norwegian Embassy through a letter that the country’s police had arrested a man in connection with the child pornographic content and that Saadat Amin was one of his accomplices in Pakistan.

According to Amin, he not only sold his own recordings but also “video clips hacked from the servers of Russian and Bangladeshi porn websites to buyers in Norway and Sweden.”

The Norwegian man paid Amin between $100 and $400 for different videos involving young boys, the official said.

So far, the FIA has recovered some 65,000 child pornography video clips from the Amin’s possession hacked from foreign websites. (IANS)

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Brazil gives online racist comments bigger audience

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Racist comments: “If she bathed, she didn’t get grimy”

Rio de Janeiro: A new campaign is giving a hard time to racist trolls in Brazil by plastering billboards in their neighbourhoods with their racist Facebook comments — thanks to a civil rights group run by Afro-Brazilian women.

The group has come up with this novel idea “to educate people that their words have a real impact”.

The campaign — ‘Virtual racism, real consequences’ — is run by Criola, an organisation founded in 1992 and led by black women.

It uses the location tag from Facebook posts to find where the offenders live. The group then buys billboard space in their neighbourhoods and puts the offenders’ comments on it, but blurring out their names and photos.

The project republishes the online comments as a reminder that virtual bullying can have an impact in the real world.

racist comment: “A black girl called Maju. You can’t complain about prejudice”
racist comment: “A black girl called Maju. You can’t complain about prejudice”

The campaign was launched in Rio de Janeiro after several racist comments were posted on social networking sites against Maria Julia Coutinho, the weather presenter of the most important news show in Brazil on July 3 — the country’s National Day to Combat Racial Discrimination.

Coutinho, the first black weather forecaster on Brazilian prime time television, corrected another anchor on air.

When another news site praised her for getting the terminology correct, many Facebook users responded with a torrent of comments against everything from her hair to her race.

racist comments: “GFY dirty nigga, I dunno u but I wash myself”
racist comments: “GFY dirty nigga, I dunno u but I wash myself”

“We wanted to provoke reflection. Does a comment on the internet causes less damage than a direct offence? For those who comment, may be. But for those who suffer it, the prejudice is the same,” says Criola on its official website.

In partnership with billboard media companies, the non-profit group put on the streets real comments posted on Facebook against the journalist.

“I got home stinking of black people,” reads one comment, while another says: “GFY dirty nigga, I dunno u but I wash myself.”

racist comments: “I arrived home smelling black people”
racist comments: “I arrived home smelling black people”

“We omitted names and faces of the authors — we had no intention of exposing the aggressors. We just wanted to raise awareness. This way people can think about the consequences before posting this kind of comment on the internet,” Coutinho says.

(IANS)

(Photos from IndianExpress.com)