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India committed to improve road safety: Gadkari

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Brasilia: Union Road Transport Minister Nitin Gadkari on Thursday said Indian government was committed to improving safety, efficiency and sustainability in the transport sector.

This approach is even more relevant in India as the problem of safety is also a problem of social equity,

Speaking at the global conference on traffic safety in Brasilia, Gadkari said India fully endorsed the Safe System Approach which is being advocated by the United Nations.

He said the road transport sector has played a key role in driving the rising Indian economy during the last few decades and major efforts are being made towards modernizing the country’s road infrastructure spread over 5 million km.

However, with over 200 million vehicles on our roads and vehicle registration witnessing a rapid increase at the rate of 10 percent annually, our country is faced with serious impacts on road safety levels,

The minister said he has asked the government for complete replacement of the Motor Vehicle Act, 1988 to encompass comprehensive promotion of road safety as well as the promotion of the development of an efficient, seamless and integrated multi-mode public transport system.

 

We are working towards making road safety a social movement. Issues related to road safety have also been included in the school curriculum.

India is collaborating with International Road Federation, WHO and World Bank who are assisting the country by way of strengthening the capabilities of various institutions, enhancing awareness, improving engineering designs for safer roads, improved trauma care and host of related activities.

(Inputs from IANS)

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Wearing helmet may reduce spine injury risk during crash

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Wear helmets to reduce spine injuries. Wikimedia Commons
Wear helmets to reduce spine injuries. Wikimedia Commons
  • Helmets may prevent serious spine injury risks
  • Cervical spine fractures were found more often in patients who were not wearing helmets
  • Helmets need to be necessary for riding two-wheelers

Helmet usage while riding a motorcycle lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particular fractures of the cervical vertebrae, a new study has found.

Helmets are important for road safety. www.livelaw.in
Helmets are important for road safety. www.livelaw.in

Major reasons cited for not requiring helmets while riding a motorcycle include freedom of choice, avoiding any limitation on vision and a perceived increased risk of receiving a CSI.

The last reason is based on the belief that the added weight of a helmet might increase torque on the cervical spine, the researcher said. “Our study suggests that wearing a motorcycle helmet is a reasonable way to limit the risk of injury to the cervical spine in a motorcycle crash,” said Nathaniel P. Brooks, MD at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison, in the US.

According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates, wearing helmets saved the lives of 1,859 motorcycle riders in 2016; an additional 802 lives could have been saved if every motorcyclist had worn them.

Also Read: Government to launch road safety policy: Modi

For the study, published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, researchers reviewed the charts of 1,061 patients who had been injured in motorcycle crashes and treated at a single Level 1 trauma centre in Wisconsin between the year 2010 to 2015.

Of those patients, 323 (30.4 percent) were wearing helmets at the time of the crash and 738 (69.6 percent) were not, as Wisconsin law does not require all riders to wear a helmet. At least one CSI was sustained by 7.4 percent of the riders wearing a helmet and 15.4 percent of those not wearing one.

Road accidents in India
Wearing helmets can reduce risk of spinal injuries during accidents. Pixabay

Cervical spine fractures occurred more often in patients who were not wearing helmets (10.8 percent compared to 4.6per cent), as did ligament injuries (1.9 percent compared with 0.3 percent); again these differences are statistically significant, the researchers said.

There were no significant differences between groups (helmeted vs. unhelmeted riders) with respect to other types of cervical spine injuries that were sustained: nerve root injury, cervical strain, or cord contusion. IANS

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