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Indian Army’s website HACKED; provident fund and dearness allowance details may have been compromised

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

The Principal Comptroller of Defence Accounts (Officers) website of Indian Army has been hacked and sensitive information about defense personnel stolen, reported an English newspaper.

MoD and the Army are looking into the matter which is being kept low key to avoid panic among officials. Many fear that their provident fund or travel allowance/dearness allowance might have been stolen.

‘We have no clue what might have happened to our salary because we are not being able to access our salary slips. The hackers have hit where it hurts the officer corps the most,’ a Major General told to Times of India.

PCDA is the financial center of the army. Defense personnel access information about their salary, receipt of claims, proof of IT returns and PF withdrawals from the site.

Many officers feel that the authorities have shown a laid back attitude to the issue.

Initially the site could be accessed but there was an ad on the bottom. Later the site could not be accessed at all.

While the defense spokesperson denied having any knowledge about the hacking, PCDA spokesperson attributed the glitch to ‘modification of computer system’ and said the site will resume shortly.

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Black Box: A Chip That Makes Hacking Impossible

In an era of Machine Learning (ML)-enabled hacking, in which Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is trained to "learn" and model inputs and outputs, a new chip-based technology termed as a "black box" can thwart hackers' plans, say researchers.

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Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals
Representational image. Pixabay

In an era of Machine Learning (ML)-enabled hacking, in which Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is trained to “learn” and model inputs and outputs, a new chip-based technology termed as a “black box” can thwart hackers’ plans, say researchers.

According to Computer Science Professor Dmitri Strukov from the University of California-Santa Barbara, he and his team were looking to put an extra layer of security on devices.

The result is a chip that deploys “ionic memristor” technology.

Key to this technology is the memristor, or memory resistor — an electrical resistance switch that can “remember” its state of resistance based on its history of applied voltage and current.

With ML, an attacker doesn't even need to know what exactly is occurring as the computer is trained on a series of inputs and outputs of a system
Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals. pixabay

A circuit made of memristors results in a “black box” of sorts, as Strukov called it, with outputs extremely difficult to predict based on the inputs.

“You can think of it as a black box. Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals,” said Strukov in a paper which appeared in the journal Nature Electronics.

With ML, an attacker doesn’t even need to know what exactly is occurring as the computer is trained on a series of inputs and outputs of a system.

Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals
Representational image. Pixabay

“For instance, if you have 2 million outputs and the attacker sees 10,000 or 20,000 of these outputs, he can, based on that, train a model that can copy the system afterwards,” said Hussein Nili, the paper’s lead author.

The “memristive black box” can circumvent this method of attack because it makes the relationship between inputs and outputs look random enough to the outside world even as the circuits’ internal mechanisms are repeatable enough to be reliable.

Also Read: Motorola Foldable Phone Concept Opens up Into a Tablet

“If we scale it a little bit further, it’s going to be hardware which could be, in many metrics, the state-of-the-art,” Strukov noted. (IANS)