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Indian IT professional killed family after online research

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London: An India-born IT professional in Britain stabbed his wife and two daughters to death after researching how to cut someone’s throat — then lived with their bodies for a weekend before hanging himself.

Jitendra Lad, 49, his wife Dukshaben Lad, 44, and their daughters Trisha, 19, and Nisha, 16, were discovered at their home in Clayton, Bradford, last October days after celebrating Diwali, the Daily Mail reported on Wednesday.

Lad had researched on depression and how to cut someone’s throat on the internet in the days leading up to the tragedy, an inquest into the deaths was told.

Lad was found hang while the three other members of the “model” family had all been stabbed in their beds with a knife. The crime scene was described as a “scene of unimaginable horror”.

The Bradford Coroner’s Court heard that Dukshaben, also known as Daksha, and her two daughters were probably killed in the early hours of Saturday, October 25. 

But Lad was seen by a number of people later the same weekend. He probably killed himself on Monday afternoon, two days later, the court heard.

The hearing was told how Lad had no medical history of mental illness and relatives and friends said they appeared to be a normal, loving family.

The hearing also heard that Lad had been stressed at work as an IT manager, and was concerned that he had been over-promoted.

The inquest heard how the bodies were discovered at the house when Daksha’s father became concerned after no one answered the phone at Lad’s house.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Depression in Males Can Reduce The Pregnancy Chances, says Study

Citing previous studies, the authors noted that 41 per cent of women seeking fertility treatments have symptoms of depression.

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Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.
Depression in males can reduce the chances of pregnancy. Pixabay

Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.

The study showed that couples in which the male partner had major depression were 60 per cent less likely to conceive and give birth than those in which the male partner did not have major depression.

On the other hand, depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of birth.

In addition, intake of a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (non-SSRIs) was also linked to a higher risk of early pregnancy loss among females being treated for infertility, the study appearing in the journal Fertility and Sterility, noted.

However, SSRIs, another class of antidepressants, were not linked to pregnancy loss. Neither depression in the female partner nor the use of any other class of antidepressant were linked to lower pregnancy rates.

 

“Our study provides infertility patients and their physicians with new information to consider when making treatment decisions,” said Esther Eisenberg, at National Institutes of Health’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in Maryland, US.

Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.
On the other hand, depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of birth. Pixabay

Citing previous studies, the authors noted that 41 per cent of women seeking fertility treatments have symptoms of depression.

Another study of men seeking in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatments reported that nearly 50 per cent experienced depression.

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For the study, the team analysed data for 1,650 women and 1,608 men to evaluate the potential influence of depression in couples seeking non-IVF treatments.

Among the women, 5.96 per cent were rated as having active major depression, compared to 2.28 per cent of the men.

Women using non-SSRIs were roughly 3.5 times as likely to have a first-trimester pregnancy loss, compared to those not using antidepressants. (IANS)

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