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INS Kochi: Biggest India-built warship commissioned

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Mumbai: INS Kochi, India’s biggest indigenously built warship, was commissioned to the Indian Navy by Defence Minister Manohar Parikkar, here on Wednesday.

Parikkar described the 7,500 tonnes vessel, capable of speeds of 30 knots, to be “as good as any foreign ship”.

INS Kochi has been built as the second in the series of the three Kolkata-Class (Project 15A) Guided Missile Destroyers at the Mazagon Docks Ltd (MDL) in Mumbai at a cost of Rs 4,000 crore, and joins the Indian Navy fleet as its 10th destroyer.

The first of the Kolkata-Class destroyers, INS Kolkata was commissioned in August 2014, while the third and final INS Chennai is due for induction by 2016-end.

These will be followed by a mega-project of nearly Rs 30,000 crore to construct four more stealth destroyers at the MDL.

INS Kochi, designed by the Indian Navy’s Directorate of Naval Design, incorporates major advancements in weapons, sensors and manoeuvring capabilities compared to its forerunner, the Delhi Class.

Spanning 164 metres and 17 metres at the beam, it is powered by four gas turbines which can achieve at least 30 knots speed.

The warship comes armed with a wide range of state-of-the-art weapons like a vertical launch missile system for long distance engagement of shore and sea-based targets.

It is only the second Indian Naval warship to have a Multi-Function Surveillance and Threat Alert Radar (MF-STAR) which provide target data to Long Range Surface-to-Air Missile systems (LR-SAM).

The MF-STAR and LR-SAM have been jointly developed by DRDO and Israel Aerospace Industries Ltd.

To protect itself from incoming air-borne or surface attacks at medium and close range, the ship has been fitted with 76 mm Super Rapid Gun Mount, AK630 Close In Weapon System, BrahMos surface-to-surface missiles, indigenous rocket launchers (IRL), indigenous twin-tube torpedo launchers and bow-mounted new generation HUMSA Sonar Dome.

It can also operate two Sea King or Chetak helicopters on board and accommodate 40 officers and 350 sailors.

 

(With inputs from IANS)

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TU-142M, a long range Maritime Patrol aircraft of Indian Navy decommissioned after 29 years of service arrives at Vizag to be converted into Museum

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TU-142M, a long range Maritime Patrol aircraft of Indian Navy decommissioned after 29 years of service arrives at Vizag , Wikimedia

Visakhapatnam, Apr 8, 2017: TU-142M, one of the long range Maritime Patrol aircraft of the Indian Navy which was decommissioned after 29 years of service, arrived here on Saturday, to be converted into a museum.

Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N. Chandrababu Naidu received the aircraft at INS Dega. He presented bouquets to the five-member crew as the aircraft landed for the final time.

Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command, Vice Admiral HCS Bisht and other officials attended the ceremony.

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Earlier, the aircraft took off from INS Rajali, the air station of the Indian Navy at Arakkonam, Tamil Nadu.

The TU-142M aircraft is the heaviest, fastest and highest flying Turbo prop in the world which had been the mainstay of long range maritime reconnaissance and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Operations of the Indian Navy for close to three decades.

Authorities were making preparation to convert the aircraft into a museum on the lines of Kursura Submarine Museum on the Beach Road here. It is expected to be ready on one acre of land on Beach Road by June. The entire project is expected to cost Rs 10 crore.

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Officials said the technical evaluation of tenders by five companies for converting the aircraft into a museum was completed and financial bid would be opened soon.

The aircraft would be dismantled at INS Dega and shifted to the site for assembling and converting it into a museum. The district authorities have finalised the tender for dismantling and shifting the aircraft. (IANS)

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Indian Navy bids farewell to TU 142M patrol aircraft

The end of Tupolev 142M's illustrious and successful career with the Indian Navy was marked by the de-induction of the aircraft

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navy
Tupolev 142M aircraft, wikimedia

Arakkonam, March 29: The Indian Navy’s long-range maritime patrol aircraft TU 142M, which played a key role in a number of key operations including the IPKF mission in Sri Lanka, was de-inducted today after a long run of accident-free service of 29 years.

The aircraft made in Russia was bid adieu by the Indian navy including its Chief Admiral Sunil Lanba at a ceremony at INS Rajali here, about 90 km from Chennai.

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The end of Tupolev 142M’s illustrious and successful career with the Navy was marked by the de-induction of the aircraft.

Tupolev 142M fleet is being replaced by 12 P-8I maritime surveillance aircraft of Boeing which are well-equipped with rockets, newly developed radars, harpoon anti-ship missiles, lightweight torpedoes, new generation sensors and much more advanced technology.

In 1988, TU 142M was introduced in the Navy at Dabolim in Goa from Russia. It shifted base to INS Rajali in 1992 and became a part of several naval exercises and operations in it’s long service-period.

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Praising and remembering the services of the TU 142M, Admiral Lanba mentioned the key role played by the aircraft in several missions involving the Indian Navy including the Indian Peace Keeping Force (IPKF) operations in Sri Lanka in the late 1980s.

For Lanba and the navy, TU 142M stands as a proud symbol of pride and might, adding that the de-induction ceremony was an emotional moment for the personnel involved with it.

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According to PTI reports, he also mentioned that P-8i with its modern technology including new-generation sensors and radars will be a “force multiplier.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter: @dubumerang

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Indian subsidiary of French naval major DCNS contributes to Clean Ganga Fund

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River Ganga, Wikimedia

New Delhi, March 24, 2017: DCNS India, the Indian subsidiary of French naval major DCNS, on Friday said it has contributed to the Clean Ganga Fund.

“DCNS India’s contribution will enable to tackle major challenges posed to Ganga, holy river of India, in a comprehensive approach adopted by Government of India, through four different modes – wastewater management, solid waste management, industrial pollution and river front development,” said a company statement.

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The firm’s contribution was handed over to Upendra Prasad Singh, Director General, National Mission for Clean Ganga.

In his remarks at the occasion, DCNS India Managing Director Bernard Buisson said: “DCNS India is proud to contribute to Swachh Bharat (Clean India) Mission, in order to ensure effective abatement of pollution and conservation of Ganga.

“As major partner of MDL and the Indian Navy through the P75 submarines programme, DCNS Group endeavours to create long-term added-value in its activities while respecting environment and ocean protection. The Group places corporate responsibility at the heart of its sustainable growth.”

The Scorpene submarines are being built by Mazagon Dockyard Ltd at Mumbai under Project 75 with transfer of technology from DCNS. Out of the six vessels, two submarines are ready. (IANS)