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Iran nuclear agreement: Why its a good news for Indian economy

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By Sakchi Srivastva

A big step has been taken by the West and Iran after they signed a tentative agreement which deals with curbing Iran’s nuclear program for at least a decade. This outcome was possible after the conclusion of marathon talks which took place in Switzerland for 8 days.

“And after many months of tough and principled diplomacy, the United States – joined by the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Russia, China, and the European Union – achieved the framework for a deal,” Barack Obama said.

This breakthrough agreement has put a full stop at all the allegations and doubts on Iran’s status of seeking to build a nuclear bomb. It is the first utilitarian deal signed in 12 years between the west and Iran. Iran has agreed to not enrich its uranium over 3.67 per cent for at least 15 years.

India, which is Iran’s second-biggest buyer on an annual basis after China, has been gradually reducing its oil imports from Tehran under US pressure. For the first time in a decade, India did not import any oil from Iran in March. But now after the deal India will embrace large quantity of oil from Iran.

Here’s how the deal pans out for India.

  1. Iran’s export was restricted to 1 million barrel per day. It was a very difficult situation for our country. But now this deal has come as a boon.
  2. Friendly relations with Iran could prove to be India’s launch pad in the wealthy West Asian market for our manufactured goods.
  3. Import of oil from Iran will also keep price shocks at bay.

“India has always maintained that the Iranian nuclear issue should be resolved peacefully by respecting Iran’s right to peaceful uses of nuclear energy as also the international community’s strong interest in the exclusively peaceful nature of Iran’s nuclear programme. The announcement yesterday underlines the success of diplomacy and dialogue, which India has always supported and which we hope would lead to a comprehensive agreement by June 30, ”
the external affairs ministry said in a statement.

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Tibetan Activist Sentenced to 5 Years of Imprisonment in China

A Tibetan education activist was on Tuesday sentenced to five years in prison by a Chinese court for inciting separatism, Amnesty International (AI) said, calling the sentence "unjust" and urging his immediate release.

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A Tibetan education activist was on Tuesday sentenced to five years in prison by a Chinese court for inciting separatism, Amnesty International (AI) said, calling the sentence “unjust” and urging his immediate release.

The main evidence against Tashi Wangchuk, who was sentenced by a court in Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai province, was a 2015 video by the New York Times about his campaign for saving the Tibetan language, according to his lawyer.

“Today’s verdict against Tashi Wangchuk is a gross injustice. He is being cruelly punished for peacefully drawing attention to the systematic erosion of Tibetan culture,” AI East Asia Research Director Joshua Rosenzweig was cited as saying by Efe news.

Before his arrest, the 31-year-old activist had expressed concern over the fact that many Tibetan children could not fluently speak their native language, contributing to the progressive extinction of the Tibetan culture.

Representational Image: Tibetan Teachings
Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

“Tashi must be immediately and unconditionally released,” demanded AI, pointing out that the activist had already spent two years in detention without access to his family.

Rosenzweig claimed that Tashi Wangchuk “was a human rights defender and prisoner of conscience who used the media and China’s own legal system in his struggle to preserve Tibetan language, culture and identity”.

In the New York Times video, the activist had highlighted “the extreme discrimination and restrictions on freedom of expression that Tibetans face in China today”.

Also Read: An Attempt to Preserve Ancient Tibetan Literature

Non-profit Human Rights Watch (HRW) also criticized the prison term for Tashi Wangchuk, whose “only crime was to peacefully call for the right of minority peoples to use their own language”, a right safeguarded by the Chinese Constitution.

“His conviction on bogus separatism charges show that critics of government policy on minorities have no legal protections,” said HRW China Director Sophie Richardson. (IANS)

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