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ISIS using localised controversies to spread wings in India

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New Delhi: At a time when the Ministry of Home Affairs was formulating an action plan to combat any aerial attack by terrorist outfits, the ISIS online book titled Black Flags from the ISIS was definitely a clarion call that they were trying to intrude into India.

They made it clear in their book that they were contemplating to expand their reach and influence beyond Iraq and Syria. Their Islamic Caliphate would include countries like India, Bangladesh and Afghanistan.

They have started spreading propaganda about expanding their reach. The fluttering of ISIS flags in Kashmir during the high-profile Indian premier’s visit and the youths shunning their country to migrate to Syria definitely indicated that the much-dreaded terror outfit had already sowed their seed of influence in a Hindu-majority nation.

In their message they have lambasted Prime Minister Narendra Modi for his ‘pro-Hindu’ approach in dealing things. The Islamic State, taking cue from the Dadri lynching incident said, a movement was developing in India against those (Muslims) who eat beef.

By attacking a dynamic premier like Narendra Modi, they made it clear that they would use every opportunity to infuse evil propaganda among the minorities (read Muslim) to misguide them and brainwash them to take up arms and unleash terror in the country.

Undeniably, the Dadri lynching incident had created some instability in India’s political fabric. The killing of a Kashmiri Muslim for allegedly eating beef had fuelled the situation. The ISIS had used these incidents to trigger a propaganda that Muslims are not safe under the Modi government.

Fuelled by the separatists groups in Kashmir, normalcy was not restored in Jammu & Kashmir even after Modi declared a lump sum financial package for the cash-starved state. ISIS was quick to pounce on it and made it a point to make their present felt. The fluttering of their flags indicates their success.

Terming Narendra Modi a ‘right-wing Hindu nationalist’, the ISIS claimed that the Indian Prime Minister ‘worships weapons’ and was ‘preparing his people for a future war against their number one enemy – Muslims’.

The terror outfit also claimed that the Paris attack was planned keeping the 2008 Mumbai attack in mind. The holding of a gun and brandishing it in public portrays the success story of the ISIS.

There was a time when the ISIS and the Al Qaeda were poles apart. While Al Qaeda fought for rights of Muslims and against the atrocities against Islamic people by the West, ISIS fought to conquer and establish a Muslim state globally.

However, the overwhelming success of the  ISIS has drawn the two terror outfits closer. ISIS knows that to wield control in the Indian subcontinent, localised militant groups need to join hand to dismantle India’s security set up.

However, the intelligence agencies are keeping a tight vigil on 150 Indians are under surveillance for their alleged online links with the IS.

Even intelligence agencies in Bangladesh have expressed apprehension that the dreaded outfit were carrying out drives to recruit people for suicide attacks.

Muslims from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Myanmar were being tricked to carry out suicide attacks. Those joining from the Indian subcontinent were, however, considered inferior to the Arab Muslims.

(With inputs from agencies)

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Islamic State Flag saying “The Caliphate is coming”, Sighted in Pakistan

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ISIS flag
Pakistani officials acknowledged that at least one IS flag was recently displayed on a billboard in Islamabad.(source: VOA)

Islamabad September 25: An Islamic State (IS), the flag was seen displayed near Islamabad which read “The Caliphate is coming,” slogan written on the flag, and was put up over a billboard Sunday on a major expressway in Islamabad.

Pakistan Interior Ministry authorities told that committee has been formed to investigate the incident. Pakistan authorities deny that IS may have established a foothold in the country.

Islamic State (ISIS) Militant Group to Soon have a Strong Hold in Southeast Asia: Report

“The group does not have an organized presence, resources or structure to be able to operate in the area,” Talal Choudhry, State Minister for Interior Affairs told VOA’s Urdu Service.

The IS terror group has taken roots in the mountain regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan since early 2015. It brands itself as the Islamic State of Khorasan (IS-K), a title that distinguishes the militant group in the region from its main branch in Iraq and Syria.

The Islamic State threat in Pakistan follows recent media reports and activities by local IS affiliates in various regions that indicate the group has been making inroads in the country.(VOA)

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Iraqi forces recapture government offices in Mosul city from Islamic State (IS) terror group

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Iraqi special forces soldiers move on foot through an alley on the outskirts of Mosul, Iraq, Nov. 4, 2016. Heavy fighting erupted in the eastern neighborhoods of Mosul Friday as Iraqi special forces launched an assault deeper into the urban areas of the city and swung round to attack Islamic State militants from a second entry point to the northeast. VOA

Baghdad, March 7, 2017: Iraqi forces on Tuesday recaptured government offices in Mosul city from the Islamic State (IS) terror group.

The Federal Police command said in a statement that the forces took over the water and sewage department’s offices along with the police directorate and the courts complex in western Mosul’s district of Dindan, Iraqi News reported.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

Earlier on Monday, Iraqi forces recaptured al-Sumoud district before storming the nearby al-Mansour, all near the city centre.

Mosul fell to IS militants in 2014, and had been proclaimed as the capital of the group’s “Islamic Caliphate” before Iraqi forces recaptured the eastern part in January. (IANS)

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Jihadi-Salafism: The Islamic ideology of ISIS

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www.news18.com

By Nithin Sridhar

A map included by BBC reporter Andrew Hosken in his new book “Empire of Fear: Inside the Islamic State” reveals that the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS) has plans to take over large chunks of the world including Indian subcontinent, Middle East, North Africa, and parts of Europe within next five years.

Photo credit: theguardian.com
Photo credit: theguardian.com

Though ISIS’s present sphere of influence is limited to Middle East, the threat it poses to India or the entire world should not be underestimated. If it indeed brings its jihad (religious war) to Indian soil, the government and the people must be ready to face it, challenge it, fight it and defeat it. This is only possible when the ideology from which it derives its strength, which guides its every action, is properly understood.

ISIS—a self-proclaimed Islamic Caliphate

In June 2014, the ISIS declared the revival of Islamic Caliphate and named Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi as Caliph Ibrahim. Therefore, when dealing with ISIS, it is important to understand that one is dealing with Islamic Caliphate.

Caliphate is basically a Muslim government headed by a Caliph who is both religious and political head of the state and the leader of the entire Muslim community, and he is also considered as the successor to the Prophet Mohammed.

Therefore, a Caliphate is basically a transnational Islamic state which claims allegiance from all Muslims irrespective of their geographical origins. It also implies a strict implementation of Sharia and Islamic mandate in its controlled area and a thrust on waging a Jihad against all nations and people who are against such a Caliphate and its violent interpretation of Islam.

The revival of Caliphate has been doing the rounds among some sections of Muslim population throughout the last century. The Muslim Brotherhood of Egypt, founded in 1928, believed that an Islamic caliphate is needed to unite all Muslims. Its founder Hasan al-Banna has been quoted as saying: “Islam requires that the Muslim community unite around one leader or one head, the head of the Islamic State, and it forbids the Muslim community from being divided among state.”

A similar view has been expressed by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the new Caliph of ISIS, who appealed people thus:Those who can immigrate to the Islamic State should immigrate, as immigration to the house of Islam is a duty … Rush O Muslims to your state … This is my advice to you. If you hold to it you will conquer Rome and own the world, if Allah wills

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi has further spoken about carrying offensive Jihad to the home territory of unbelievers. He has been quoted as saying: “going after the apostate unbelievers by attacking [them] in their home territory, in order to make God’s word most high and until there is no persecution.

Regarding the violent methods adopted by the ISIS against non-Sunnis and non-Muslims, Joseph Farah, editor in chief of WND says: “Brutality difficult for Westerners to even imagine is the modus operandi of ISIS. It calls for a scorched-earth policy against its enemies—which includes Christians, Shiites, Alawites, Jews, non-believers and all non-Sunnis. ISIS leadership advocates and practices barbarism designed to strike fear into the hearts and minds of its opponents and anyone who doesn’t stand with them in their strict Sharia Sunni code.”

ISIS and the Jihadi-Salafism stream of Islam

The ideology of the ISIS can be classified as “Jihadi-Salafism”, a term coined by scholar Gilles Kepel in 2002. The leaders of ISIS have also used the term by addressing its adherents and supporters as “al-Salafiyya, al-Jihadiyya”. It refers to a particular religious and political ideological movement rooted in Sunni Islam and its extremist reading of the Islamic scriptures.

In the “Islamic State”, Richard Barrett comments: “Aside from a lust for power, the driving ideological force behind The Islamic State comes from ….. fundamentalist canon of Islamic opinion that stretches from the 14th Century scholar Ibn Taymiyya through Muhammad ibn ʿAbd al Wahhab, who died in 1792, to modern day Salafist ideologues. Essentially their interpretation of Islam demands the harsh and absolute rejection of any innovation since the times of the Prophet. They argue that any diversion from puritanical precepts that they draw from a literal reading of the Quran and the Hadith is blasphemy, and must be eradicated. It follows therefore that Shi’ism, Sufism or essentially anything and anyone, that does not conform to their interpretation of Islam, should be destroyed….The Islamic State therefore claims legitimacy for its violence by arguing that all its actions are in the interest of reviving Islam, returning it to its pure form, uniting the Muslim world under truly Islamic rule, and so restoring the dignity and greatness of its people while fulfilling the orders of God.”

This extreme ideological Islamic movement has two components: Jihad and Salafism. Salafism was historically a theological movement within Sunni Islam, which aimed at purifying the Islamic faith. It aimed to do so by returning to the pure form of Islam as practiced by Prophet and by eliminating idolatry and affirming the oneness of God. It considers all those who are perceived as worshiping stones, saints, tombs etc. as “shirk” (idolaters) and hence as deserters of one true religion. They even consider Shia’s as shirks because of their giving importance and reverence to Prophet Mohammed’s family members. Salafism was also intimately related to the extremist Wahhabi movement of Saudi Arabia.

On the other hand, various Jihadi movements emerged during the latter half of 20th century that aimed to establish Islamic rule in Muslim-dominant countries. Further, many jihadi organizations waged “defensive” jihad against what they perceived as oppression by western countries.

ISIS which adheres to Jihadi-Salafism not only practices defensive jihad, but it also propounds “offensive” jihad using which it intends to uproot shirk (idolatry) from the globe. In a 2007 speech, the ISIS Caliph explained the purpose of jihad by quoting a Wahhabi scholar thus:The end to which fighting the unbelievers leads is, no idolater remaining in the world.

Cole Bunzel in “From Paper State to Caliphate: The Ideology of the Islamic State” summarizes the doctrines of ISIS thus:

  1. All Muslims must be associated exclusively with fellow “true” Muslims and disassociate with anyone not fitting the definition of “true” Muslim. (The ISIS considers as “true” Muslim only those who adhere to its Jihadi-Salafism interpretation of Islam)
  2. Failure to rule in accordance with God’s law constitutes unbelief.
  3. Fighting the Islamic State is tantamount to apostasy.
  4. All Shia Muslims are apostates deserving of death.

Further, being rooted in Salafism, ISIS also considers all later interpretations of Islamic scriptures as “bidah” (innovation) and hence un-Islamic. Therefore, ISIS implements sharia in a literal and historical sense as it was practiced in medieval Arabia. It is for this reason that ISIS is also involved in taking women as sex-slaves.

Therefore, if ever the ISIS comes knocking at the doors of India, it is clear that its intentions are to make India a part of its Islamic Caliphate, implement Sharia rule over Indian population and convert or kill all those people who do not adhere to its Jihadi-Salafism brand of Islam. ISIS poses dangers not only to the non-Muslim Indian majority, but also to non-Sunni Muslims present in India. In fact, all those Muslims including Sunni Muslims who do not accept its Caliphate and who do not adhere to its extremist interpretation of Islam would be branded as non-Muslims and punished accordingly.

Hence, it is important for India to recognize ISIS as a legitimate threat from an Islamic Caliphate rooted in literal and violent interpretations of Islam and not undermine it as a threat from a non-religious terrorist organization.