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Jamaat-e-Islami Bangladesh behind Attacks on Hindus and other Religious Minorities, says Noted Writer and Rights Activist Shahriar Kabir

The Jamaat, along with Jamaat ul Mujahidden Bangladesh are organising the attacks on Hindus

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Jamaat-e-Islami Bangladesh, Wikimedia

Kolkata, Nov 23, 2016: The main conspirator behind the attack on Hindu community and other religious minorities in Bangladesh is Jamaat-e-Islami Bangladesh, feels the noted writer and rights activist Shahriar Kabir.

Being one of the key men behind the movement for the trial of the 1971 war criminals and against fundamentalism and communalism in his country, Kabir says, by doing this, the Jamaat-e-Islami Bangladesh was trying to destabilise the nation and show it in a bad light, mentioned PTI.

The main agenda of Jamaat-e-Islami Bangladesh is to wipe out non-believers of Islam. Click To Tweet

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To wipe out non-believers of Islam has been the main agenda of Jamaat-e-Islami Bangladesh. “They are attacking not only religious minorities in Bangladesh like Hindus and Christians but also secular Muslims who do not subscribe to their view,” Kabir told PTI.

Needless to say that the Jamaat, along with Jamaat ul Mujahidden Bangladesh are organising the attacks on Hindus. “They want to portray our country in poor light. The present government is trying its best to protect the minorities. They have taken stern steps against Jamaat and JMB activists,” he added.

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Currently, Kabir is on an India tour for his documentary movie “Journey to Justice” that deals with the genocide, which took place during the 1971 liberation war in Bangladesh.

In early November, a series of attacks took place on people belonging to Hindu community and their property in Bangladesh. Miscreants had set ablaze some of their houses as well as damaged two temples in central Brahmanbarhia district, where numerous places of worship of the minority community were vandalised.

– prepared by NewsGram with inputs from PTI

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Police held 53 for attacking Hindus in Bangladesh

Hindu families were looted and their homes set on fire over a rumoured Facebook post

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Hindu minorities in Bangladesh
In recent times, there has been an increment in the number of attacks on Hindus in Bangladesh.

Dhaka, Nov 11:The Bangladesh police have detained 53 people in connection with arson attacks on the homes of Hindus over a rumoured Facebook post by a local “insulting religion”.

More than 30 homes belonging to Hindu families in Rangpur’s Thakurbari village were ransacked and looted before being set on fire by a mob on Friday over the “derogatory” status posted by a Hindu man, Bdnews24.com reported.

One person, 30-year-old Habibur Rahman, was killed when the police opened fire to ward off the angry mob that turned violent and set fire to several homes. Eleven others were injured in the violence.

Police filed two cases over the incidents and arrested 53 people, said Police Superintendent Mizanur Rahman.

One of the victims, Dulali Rani told the Dhaka Tribune: “A mob came to our neighbourhood on Friday afternoon and started ransacking our home without any provocation. They even took our cattle.

“They burned everything, even my cooking pots. We do not have a place to sleep at night, and no way to cook food.”

Home set on fire
Burning house represents Hindu houses burned in Bangladesh

Several villagers said that if someone posted a derogatory status on Facebook, hold that one person accountable for his or her action.

The status was allegedly put on social media by Thakurbari village native Titu Roy, but very few villagers admitted to seeing it, the daily reported.

One of the witnesses said thousands of protesters from six nearby villages banded together after the Jumma prayers and attacked the Hindu neighbourhood.

A three-member investigation committee was formed to probe the situation. The district administration said it is making special arrangements to compensate the victims of the attacks. (IANS)

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PM Narendra Modi Condemns Religious Violence on 71st Indian Independence Day, Warns “Will Not Accept Violence In The Name Of Faith”

PM Modi pitched in the slogan of "Bharat Jodo" (Unite India) this Independence Day.

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Narendra Modi
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addresses the nation. VOA
  • India celebrates 71st Independence Day
  • Indian PM Narendra Modi addressed the nation from the Red Fort
  • “We cannot accept violence in the name of faith,” said PM Modi in his address to the countrymen

New Delhi, August 15, 2017: As India celebrates its 71st Independence Day, the countrymen alike waited for the dynamic Indian Prime Minister’s address to the nation. Pitching for harmony and peace in his address today, the Indian Prime Minister condemned violence in the name of astha (faith).

Following the unfurling of the national flag at Red Fort, Prime Minister Modi began his address to fellow Indians with the aspiration of building a ‘new India’, emphasizing that the country dwells upon concepts of equality and no distinctions should be made amongst people.

Throughout his address, the Indian Prime Minister touched upon issues that have been relevant in the Indian Diaspora in the last couple of months including the turmoil in Kashmir, Gorakhpur tragedy, demonetization, and triple talaq.

Referring to the persisting unrest in Kashmir, PM Modi spoke about the gali (abuse) and goli (bullet) association, asserting that these will not help resolve the issue. He emphasized on the need to embrace all Kashmiris.

Talking about violence, he also added that the country will show no mercy to terrorists, however they are free to enter the mainstream and have their issues addressed. PM Modi further stressed about countering the ill plaguing the world today saying that with India’s rising stature, it is supported in its stand to fight the menace of terrorism by the entire world.

ALSO READ: India Celebrates its 71st Independence Day: What People Want Freedom From?

In his nationwide address from the Red Fort, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi also asserted that violence in the name of astha (faith) will not be accepted, calling casteism and communalism “poison” for the country.

This comes in a context where an increasing number of mob lynching cases have taken place, witnessing outrage in the country.

Touching upon the issue of casteism and religion, the PM asserted that India is a country of “shanti, ekta and sadbhavna” (peace, unity and goodwill) and that distinction on caste, community or religion, will not help us in our entirety.

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As part of religious violence, religion acts either as the subject or the object of violent behavior. It is either motivated by, or is a reaction to religious beliefs, texts or doctrines. Contrary to popular notion, religious violence does not only refer to acts committed by religious groups, but also include attacks on religious groups. In the last few months, there have been significant such cases reported in India, including cases of mob lynching and attacks by cow vigilantes.

“There is no place for intolerance in today’s India; this is the land of Gandhi and Buddha” said PM Modi underlying that it is in the culture of the nation to walk collectively and peacefully on the path to development.

In his address, the Indian Prime Minister also asserted that the country had previously operated on the lines of “Bharat Chhodo” (Quit India) but now, that has transformed to “Bharat Jodo” (Unite India).

 


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Can Flourishing Islamic State (ISIS) be Stopped in Afghanistan?

The truth about IS and Afghanistan is definitely no picnic

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Taliban fighters react to a speech by their senior leader in the Shindand district of Herat province, Afghanistan, May 27, 2016.
Taliban fighters react to a speech by their senior leader in the Shindand district of Herat province, Afghanistan, May 27, 2016. The rise of IS in Afghanistan has become such a priority that U.S. and Afghan forces sometimes support the Taliban while battling IS, VOA
  • Depending on the location, the proliferation of IS has drawn varied resistance from the Afghan military, U.S. air support and ground troops, local militias, Taliban forces and other militant groups
  • Afghan army planes on Wednesday night accidentally air dropped vital supplies of food and water to IS militants in the Darzab district of northern Jouzjan province instead of to their own besieged troops
  • In the Tora Bora area, where IS has made a strong stand in recent days, local villagers and militias joined with Taliban to rout IS

June 25, 2017: The Islamic State group is rapidly expanding in parts of Afghanistan, advancing militarily into areas where it once had a weak presence and strengthening its forces in core regions, according to Afghan and U.S. officials.

Depending on the location, the proliferation of IS has drawn varied resistance from the Afghan military, U.S. air support and ground troops, local militias, Taliban forces and other militant groups.

Attacking IS has become such a priority in the country, that disparate forces sometimes join together in the ad-hoc fight, with Afghan and U.S. forces finding themselves inadvertently supporting the enemy Taliban in battling IS.

Confusion leads to mistakes

All too often, officials say, mistakes are made due to confusion on the ground.

Afghan army planes on Wednesday night accidentally air dropped vital supplies of food and water to IS militants in the Darzab district of northern Jouzjan province instead of to their own besieged troops, provincial police chief, Rahmatullah Turkistani told VOA. The supplies were meant to help Afghan forces that are countering twin attacks by IS and Taliban militants but were used instead by IS.

“It’s not getting better in Afghanistan in terms of IS,” U.S. Chief Pentagon Spokeswoman Dana White told VOA this week. “We have a problem, and we have to defeat them and we have to be focused on that problem.”

Reinforcements for the IS cause reportedly are streaming into isolated areas of the country from far and wide. There are reports of fighters from varied nationalities joining the ranks, including militants from Pakistan, India, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Russia and Central Asian neighbors.

Confusing scenarios

Still, the Islamic State-Khorasan (ISK) as IS is known in Afghanistan remains a fragmented group composed of differing regional forces with different agendas in different parts of the country.

“IS-K is still conducting low-level recruiting and distribution of propaganda in various provinces across Afghanistan, but it does not have the ability or authority to conduct multiple operations across the country,” a recent Pentagon report said. But where it operates, IS is inflicting chaos and casualties and causing confusing scenarios for disparate opponents.

In the Tora Bora area, where IS has made a strong stand in recent days, local villagers and militias joined with Taliban to rout IS. IS regained ground after a few days, leading to U.S. military air attacks on IS positions in conjunction with Afghan intelligence instructions and army operations.

IS fighters reportedly have fled from mountain caves of Tora Bora, where al-Qaida’s leader Osama bin Laden hid from U.S. attack in 2001.

Families displaced

IS fighters were also reportedly advancing in neighboring Khogyani district, displacing hundreds of families, according to district officials. It is one of several areas in Nangarhar province, near the Pakistani border, where IS has been active for over two years.

Fierce clashes in the Chaparhar district of Nangarhar last month left 21 Taliban fighters and seven IS militants dead, according to a provincial spokesman. At least three civilians who were caught in the crossfire were killed and five others wounded.

“IS has overpowered Taliban in some parts of Nangarhar because the Taliban dispatched its elite commando force called Sara Qeta (Red Brigade) to other parts of the country, including some northern provinces to contain the growing influence of IS there,” Wahid Muzhda, a Taliban expert in Kabul, told VOA.

ALSO READ: Flashback to Terror: 1993 Mumbai Blasts Judgement to Hail on June 27 After 24 Years

Recruiting unemployed youths

IS has also expanded in neighboring Kunar province, where, according to provincial police chief, it has a presence in at least eight districts and runs a training base, where foreign members of IS, train new recruits.

Hundreds of miles from Nangarhar, IS is attempting to establish a persistent presence in several northern provinces where it has found a fertile ground for attracting militants and recruiting unemployed youths, mostly between the age of 13 and 20.

IS has been able to draw its members from the Pakistani Taliban fighters, former Afghan Taliban, and other militants who “believe that associating with or pledging allegiance” to IS will further their interests, according to the Pentagon report.

Hundreds of militants have joined IS ranks in northern Jouzjan and Sar-e-Pul province where local militant commanders lead IS-affiliate groups in several districts.

Darzab district

Qari Hekmat, an ethnic Uzbek and former Taliban militant who joined IS a year ago, claims to have up to 500 members, including around 50 Uzbek nationals who are affiliated with the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU) — previously associated with al-Qaida and Taliban in Afghanistan.

IS and Taliban are reportedly fighting over the control of Darzab district in Jouzjan which they stormed this week from two different directions and besieged scores of government forces. The Taliban has reportedly captured the center of the district while IS militants control the city outskirts.

Afghanistan faces a continuing threat from as many as 20 insurgent and terrorist networks present or operating in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region, including IS, the Pentagon said.

“In areas where the government has limited influence and control, IS attempts to emerge and expand there,” Ateequllah Amarkhail, an analysts and former Army general in Kabul told VOA.

Hit-and-hide strategy

IS has also claimed responsibility for several recent attacks in urban areas, however, with a hit-and-hide strategy that is proving effective. And it is engaging too in more skirmishes with U.S. forces that initially were sent to the country to help Afghan forces halt the spread of Taliban.

Three American service members based in eastern Afghanistan were killed in April during operations targeting IS militants, according to the Pentagon.

“ISIS-K remains a threat to Afghan and regional security, a threat to U.S. and coalition forces, and it retains the ability to conduct high-profile attacks in urban centers,” the Pentagon said. (VOA)