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Jawahar Bagh incident prime accused Ram Vriksh Yadav may be alive as DNA doesn’t Match with his son’s

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Lucknow, April 17, 2017: In a surprise twist to the infamous Jawaharbagh incident, in which over two dozen people, including two senior police officers were killed in Mathura last year, a forensic lab report says that the DNA of prime accused Ram Vriksh Yadav, reportedly found dead, does not match with his son’s.

The Central Forensic Science Laboratory (CFSL), Hyderabad, in its report has inferred that the DNA picked from the corpse supposedly of Ram Vriksh does not match with his son’s DNA.

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A Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader Ashwani Upadhyaya had petitioned the Allahabad High Court, seeking a DNA test on the body of Ram Vriksh to ascertain whether the allegedly dead person was him or not.

Following this, the High Court had ordered a DNA verification by the CFSL, report of which was submitted before the court on Monday.

Yadav and his men had encroached upon a multi-acre park in the centre of Mathura and when on orders of a court, police went to clear them out in June last year, the police team was fired upon in which SP (City) Mukul Dwivedi and SO Santosh Kumar Yadav were killed.

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Later, as many as 24 persons, including many encroachers, were also killed in the violence that followed.

The incident had made international headlines for the scale of violence and the fact that senior police officials were also killed.

After the DNA report, police now suspect that Ram Vriksh might be alive and hiding, and the body considered as his was of somebody else. (IANS)

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Scientists discover UV light to kill flu virus

By contrast, the study found that continuous low doses of far-UVC light, which is around 207 to 222 nanometers in wavelength, is capable to inactivate more than 95 percent of aerosolized H1N1 flu virus in a lab setting

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earlier studies have proved that far-UVC light is not harmful to the human body. Wikimedia Commons
earlier studies have proved that far-UVC light is not harmful to the human body. Wikimedia Commons

Scientists have discovered a special type of ultraviolet (UV) light that can kill airborne flu viruses without harming human tissues, according to a new study.

Broad-spectrum ultraviolet C (UVC) light, which has a wavelength of between 200 to 400 nanometers, has been routinely used to kill bacteria and viruses by destroying the molecular bonds that hold their DNA together, reports Xinhua news agency.

“Unfortunately, conventional germicidal UV light is also a human health hazard and can lead to skin cancer and cataracts, which prevents its use in public spaces,” said David J.

Also Read: Scientists Use Pocket-size Device to Map Human Genetic Code

Brenner, lead author and director of the Centre for Radiological Research at Columbia University Irving Medical Centre, in a statement on Saturday.

By contrast, the study found that continuous low doses of far-UVC light, which is around 207 to 222 nanometers in wavelength, is capable to inactivate more than 95 percent of aerosolized H1N1 flu virus in a lab setting.

Moreover, earlier studies have proved that far-UVC light is not harmful to the human body.

If these results are confirmed in other scenarios, the use of overhead far-UVC light in hospitals, doctors’ offices, schools, airports, aeroplanes and other public spaces could provide a powerful check on seasonal flu epidemics and pandemics, said the study.

Also Read: Your body could soon power wearable devices

Flu activity continues to increase across the United States, making the season the most recent “high” severity season, the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report on Friday.

Sixty-three children died from flu this winter, it added. (IANS)

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