Tuesday April 24, 2018
Home India Jawahar Bagh ...

Jawahar Bagh incident prime accused Ram Vriksh Yadav may be alive as DNA doesn’t Match with his son’s

0
//
77
Ram Vraksh Yadav, Twitter
Republish
Reprint

Lucknow, April 17, 2017: In a surprise twist to the infamous Jawaharbagh incident, in which over two dozen people, including two senior police officers were killed in Mathura last year, a forensic lab report says that the DNA of prime accused Ram Vriksh Yadav, reportedly found dead, does not match with his son’s.

The Central Forensic Science Laboratory (CFSL), Hyderabad, in its report has inferred that the DNA picked from the corpse supposedly of Ram Vriksh does not match with his son’s DNA.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

A Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader Ashwani Upadhyaya had petitioned the Allahabad High Court, seeking a DNA test on the body of Ram Vriksh to ascertain whether the allegedly dead person was him or not.

Following this, the High Court had ordered a DNA verification by the CFSL, report of which was submitted before the court on Monday.

Yadav and his men had encroached upon a multi-acre park in the centre of Mathura and when on orders of a court, police went to clear them out in June last year, the police team was fired upon in which SP (City) Mukul Dwivedi and SO Santosh Kumar Yadav were killed.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

Later, as many as 24 persons, including many encroachers, were also killed in the violence that followed.

The incident had made international headlines for the scale of violence and the fact that senior police officials were also killed.

After the DNA report, police now suspect that Ram Vriksh might be alive and hiding, and the body considered as his was of somebody else. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Stars’ ‘DNA’ could help scientists find Sun’s lost siblings

Unfortunately, astronomers cannot collect the DNA of a star with a mouth swab but instead use the starlight, with a technique called spectroscopy

0
//
12
UFO religion as a concept is now becoming a part of popular understanding.
Countless galaxies exist in the universe, each hiding secrets that humankind is yet to unearth. Pixabay

With the aim to find the lost siblings of the Sun, now scattered across the sky, a team of astronomers has collected the “DNA” of more than 340,000 stars in the Milky Way.

The “DNA” can help trace the ancestry of stars, showing astronomers how the universe went from having only hydrogen and helium — just after the Big Bang — to being filled today with all the elements we have here on Earth that are necessary for life.

Little Cub galaxy
Scientists to find sun’s lost siblings. Wikimedia Commons

The research, detailed in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, is based on the Galactic Archaeology survey, called GALAH, launched in late 2013 as part of a quest to uncover the formulation and evolution of galaxies. When complete, GALAH will investigate more than a million stars.

The GALAH survey used the HERMES spectrograph at the Australian Astronomical Observatory’s (AAO) 3.9-metre Anglo-Australian Telescope near Coonabarabran in New South Wales to collect spectra for the 340,000 stars. “No other survey has been able to measure as many elements for as many stars as GALAH,” said Gayandhi De Silva of the University of Sydney and AAO.

Also Read: Next Planet-Hunting Mission Of NASA Postponed

“This data will enable such discoveries as the original star clusters of the Galaxy, including the Sun’s birth cluster and solar siblings — there is no other dataset like this ever collected anywhere else in the world,” De Silva said.

The Sun, like all stars, was born in a group or cluster of thousands of stars, explained Sarah Martell from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Sydney who leads the GALAH survey observations. “Every star in that cluster will have the same chemical composition, or DNA – these clusters are quickly pulled apart by our Milky Way Galaxy and are now scattered across the sky,” Martell said.

Black hole in milky way
Scientists are collecting DNA of stars. VOA

“The GALAH team’s aim is to make DNA matches between stars to find their long-lost sisters and brothers,” she added. For each star, this DNA is the amount they contain of each of nearly two dozen chemical elements such as oxygen, aluminium and iron.

Unfortunately, astronomers cannot collect the DNA of a star with a mouth swab but instead use the starlight, with a technique called spectroscopy. The light from the star is collected by the telescope and then passed through an instrument called a spectrograph, which splits the light into detailed rainbows, or spectra. IANS